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Old 12-16-2011, 02:05 PM   #796
dwoodward
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
+1

Not a fan of either so called safety tool.
A tool is a tool. Every tool has a function. If you need to perform that function, having the right tool can make a difference.

There's a fire extinguisher in my garage. I've never had to use it, but it's there. I check to make sure it's charged up when I replace the batteries in the smoke detectors.

I know where the horn button is on my bike, and I check to make sure they work every once in a while.

If you use either one very often, you're doing something wrong.
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Old 12-20-2011, 03:17 AM   #797
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I am a part-time mechanic in an independent shop. We work on anything that comes in. We sell a lot of tires. Something to keep in mind is the tires are all that's between you and the road. Do some research before you buy new tires. Then buy the best ones you can afford, and keep them properly inflated. I've lost track of how many customers bring their bike in for the spring tune-up, and that's the only time tire pressure gets checked all year.

Occasionally take some time not to ride, but give the bike a bath. This will get you down closer to it so that you can really look it over while you wash it. Otherwise you might not notice little things before they turn into big things.

Oftentimes on my way to the shop on weekends I ride past a riding course, so I'll stop and observe for a while. Almost every time I see the student-riders almost rigid in the saddle, back straight, elbows locked, and looking uncomfortable. RELAX! Get comfortable with your bike. Pretend you're dancing with your favorite partner. Enjoy the ride. If it starts to feel more like work than fun, maybe it's time to park the bike for a bit until you get your head back where it belongs for the ride.
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Old 12-20-2011, 10:05 AM   #798
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Originally Posted by dwoodward View Post
A tool is a tool. Every tool has a function.

Plus one. I use it every time there is an obstruction between me and a car.

The possibilities are endless, from a car entering a parking garage obscuring the vision of a car exiting that garage, or you're going down the left of a two-laner in the city and someone stops on your right to let a left turner out...

I've also used it to let stupid people know they've stopped in front of someone and need to GTFOOTW or they are going too slow and I need to get out of the firing line of traffic.. Just because I like sandwiches, it doesn't mean I want to be one...


Lay on that fkr! To my knowledge it's not illegal to over-use... Just like a turn signal...
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Old 12-22-2011, 08:47 PM   #799
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Originally Posted by manic mechanic View Post
Occasionally take some time not to ride, but give the bike a bath. This will get you down closer to it so that you can really look it over while you wash it. Otherwise you might not notice little things before they turn into big things.


I found a small coolant leak on my bike prior to washing it one day. 15 bucks and 4 hours later she's as good as new (minus 3 weeks waiting for 15 dollar parts ) This was this past summer in Texas, I could have done some serious damage to the bike had I not known about the leak. I wasn't really bummed about missing out on all those 100+ degree days of riding opportunities
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Old 12-28-2011, 11:24 PM   #800
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Eh? If you can't stop in time, swerve instead.

This may have been posted already but here is my two cents:

If you can't stop in time, swerve instead.

This has saved me a few times already. Now when I ride, especially on the freeway (in a congested city), I try to stay near lanes that have a shoulder for me to escape onto. If no shoulder, then I usually pick a middle lane that would allow me to split lanes for second if I have to. Construction areas usually have no shoulders, but porter barrier everywhere, so be extra careful there. Remember, bikes are smaller than cars, so we can fit places they can't.

I learned this lesson the hard way, but was saved by the grace of God. I came up on a construction zone where traffic was stopped on a blind corner, under an overpass. A lane closure was set up so I had to merge but the cager wouldn't let me in, so I gunned it to get infront of him. When I changed lanes and looked forward, I could see traffic stopped dead in front of me.

I hit the brakes, but since I was on a corner, my rear locked up and my bike went sideways. I let of the rear to gain control, keeping my front wheel forward, then mashed the rear again to have the bike go sideways again. I let off the rear brake to right my bike, then hit it again and went sideways again. I was still going about 30 mph headed right for the rear of the car infront of me with about 30 feet to spare. At this point, the rear sliding out had left my bike slightly headed to the shoulder, which was barrelled off with orange barrels. Iv'e worked road construction for well over a decade, so I knew that those orange barrels pop off when hit, leaving a heavy rubber base on the ground. So I quit braking, swerved left, and plowed the barrel, popping it off its base, but still able to keep the bike upright. It took me two more car lengths to stop. I turned off the bike, got off and started breathing heavy. My bike had orange barrel smeared on it, with bits of orange reflective material. This all took place in about 3 seconds.

I probably looked like an asshole, or a damn lucky stuntman, putting the bike sideways and righting it twice, only to smash an orange barrel and still keep the bike upright again. Since then, I have always looked out for places to escape.

I was riding a KLR 650, and had a total of 2000 motorcycle miles under my belt. But Iv'e had lots of mtn biking experience, which made me comfortable with sideways borne bike. Still, the grace of God was there, and I said a prayer afterwards.

Remember, bikes can fit in small places, even if you have to plow a barrel to get there.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:56 AM   #801
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"Plus one. I use it every time there is an obstruction between me and a car."


What... so they can move out of the way in order to facilitate you hitting the car?


Dude... you stepped right into again!
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Old 01-01-2012, 01:19 PM   #802
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I'm guessing he meant the obstruction kept the car driver from seeing the bike/rider. Horn says "I'm here, but you can't see me because of the obstruction."
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Old 01-06-2012, 04:21 AM   #803
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As a noob to riding motorcycles on the street, I gotta say... What a helpful thread.

See, i've been driving my car since I was 15... Started of with a manual transmission and never went back.. I hate driving automatics.. I think they should never have made automatic transmissions to start with. Just my opinion..
In fact, I almost crashed one time driving my sisters car to the groceries cause I was reaching for the "invisible clutch"!!! (daily MT drivers who have had to drive a AT car once in a blue moon know what im talking about)
Been through plenty of crashes caused by dumbass driving mostly on my young n dumb mentality. Went through that whole racer phase.. and I went through it HARD. Ticket after ticket almost like i'd never learn.

I am now 27, pushing 28 this month. I can safely say i've grown out of being a dumbass on the road. In retrospect, I used to put everyone on the road in danger to say the least. I was "that guy" who would pull out carelessly and wreckless thinking i was the shit and knew everything about driving. I am now over that shit and love to drive safe. Safety is my main concern now that I have been blessed with a baby girl. I have to be a good father for her and good husband for my wife to ensure we keep happy.

Now, going back to loving safe driving/riding: I've learned that you can never be too cautious when it comes to thinking everyone on the road is not necessarily a dumbass, but at least accept the fact that they don't know how experienced or how much lack of experience they have. I for sure always have to remind myself that I am still learning as my body and mind are changing. You have to adapt along with your capabilities. Driving is something we weren't meant to do by nature. People get carried away and get extremely complacent with their safety. After all, it is like riding a sci-fi beastly machine. Driving/riding is absolutely exhilarating and seasons the soul.

Just remember, you can never ever be too careful. Use your general knowledge and life experience of the rules of the road and how people do/do not follow them.
Find that balance between "OH SHIT MODE and Wow, I love this." and you'll be alright. You're gonna crash once or twice. Try and make it a soft landing.


My .2 cents.

Happy riding!
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Scientist of Fun screwed with this post 01-20-2012 at 05:49 AM Reason: added the "o" on too for clarification. LOL
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Old 01-14-2012, 09:33 PM   #804
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going from a KX125 to a TT600 is a BAD idea. You should probably stair step your way up... especially if you are 15! Yes I had been riding bikes and ATVs for over 10 years by that point, BUT it still was a bad idea. But the 600 was free The PO was slightly scared of it.
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:05 AM   #805
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going from a KX125 to a TT600 is a BAD idea. You should probably stair step your way up... especially if you are 15! Yes I had been riding bikes and ATVs for over 10 years by that point, BUT it still was a bad idea. But the 600 was free The PO was slightly scared of it.
Not a bad bike the TT600, had one years ago, '86 it was, i think.
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Old 01-16-2012, 03:04 AM   #806
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
This applies to other things too.
Did I say too much?
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Old 01-21-2012, 07:01 PM   #807
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I started riding about 2 years ago, and something that really helped me out was someone who told me not to buy a fast bike for the first one, haha. I started on a CM400 Honda, which had enough power to be fun to wind out, but not enough that you could really get yourself into trouble without realizing it. It was also light enough to pick up on my own which was nice, though I only dropped it once.

Also, practice riding on loose stuff. I know it's been said here, but it's much easier to deal with in a sudden situation if that's not the first time you've slid a bike around or locked up a wheel.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:40 AM   #808
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Originally Posted by gearheadE30 View Post
I started riding about 2 years ago, and something that really helped me out was someone who told me not to buy a fast bike for the first one, haha. I started on a CM400 Honda, which had enough power to be fun to wind out, but not enough that you could really get yourself into trouble without realizing it. It was also light enough to pick up on my own which was nice, though I only dropped it once.

Also, practice riding on loose stuff. I know it's been said here, but it's much easier to deal with in a sudden situation if that's not the first time you've slid a bike around or locked up a wheel.
Yeah, I work for an import/export logistics company. We load/ unload plastics and sand into 18 wheelers all day... The whole lot is full of soft dirt and sand... When its slow I go slide my back end around to test the limits of the bike, I have yet to drop it.. but plan on doing so just to see what my limits are.
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:52 PM   #809
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What I try to pass on is that a motorcycle is not a car. That normal things you do in a car in traffic can get you into trouble on a bike. I see guys do it on my commute all the time, tailgating, swerving around trucks not knowing what's behind them, trusting turn signals, riding in blind spots. After driving cars for a a few years you develop certain habits that you have to abandon when you start riding a motorcycle. Unfortunately a lot of guys perpetuate car driving habits on a bike.

I always tell the story of the safety class I took years ago with my brother. We were learning about the importance of the front brake, 70% of the stopping power, etc. A woman in class who droned on and one about riding on the back of her husband's Harley said "oh, my husband never uses his front brake". Probably never took a class or picked up a book or learned from anyone and just perpetuated myths and bad habits.
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Old 01-25-2012, 02:51 PM   #810
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...I see guys do it on my commute all the time, tailgating, swerving around trucks not knowing what's behind them, trusting turn signals, riding in blind spots...
None of those things are good habits for cars or motos. If you keep to good habits in a car, you don't have to change what you do on the moto.
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