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Old 04-04-2010, 02:43 PM   #91
Sink
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Trust me on this one. Keep yor shield on you helmet closed . It is no fun to have a bee in your helmet when your going down the road

As said earlier, wear the gear. And invest in quality gear.


Put a few used dryer sheets in your helmet when you put it up, helps keep the odor down.


When putting your bike up for the winter put in stabilizer, around here they put ethanol in the gas and it soaks up water.


Keep the tank full when you put it up and raise the tires off the ground. Attach a battery tender to your ride. When I pull into the garage I hook mine up. Nothing worse to get all geared up to go for a ride and your battery is dead.

Most helmet manufactures and other riders recommended replacing your helmet every 5-6 years. They deterioate over time from sunlight, oil and aweat from your smelly head.

Never set your helmet on the seat or tank. It will fall off. It may cause damage that you can't see, until you fall off and it breaks in half.

Don't try to clean the bugs off your visor with a paper towel, it will scratch the shit out off it. When you get home from your ride soak a towel or paper towel, place it on it for awhile to soften the bugs. Then clean with a microfiber towel.
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Sink screwed with this post 04-04-2010 at 02:53 PM
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Old 04-04-2010, 07:45 PM   #92
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Don't ride behind or stay very far back from any vehicle that has stuff attached that can fly off.

Examples:

- Anything on top (Bicycle, Thule cargo box, mattress, canoe, kayak, etc....)

- Work trucks - like a gardener with a pickup filled with all sorts of crap, work truck filled with tools, etc....

- Trailered cars or bikes

The list goes on forever.....

Assume that anything might fly/fall off, hit you and ruin your day will do just that.


I think it was on ADV where I read of a rider who had an oncoming Subaru lose a kayak mid-turn and almost take him out.

In Sturgis in 2005 a rider was killed when a Porta-pottie fell off of a truck in front of him.
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:17 AM   #93
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Front Brakes

Front brakes are your friend......(except when running off of a road racing course into wet grass on a sport bike)
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:14 AM   #94
luni
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duck
Don't ride behind or stay very far back from any vehicle that has stuff attached that can fly off.

Assume that anything might fly/fall off, hit you and ruin your day will do just that.
As one of the aforementioned dangerous pickup trucks. Do not follow me. The back of my truck is a bucket. Or in some people's eyes, a free dumpster that will take their trash far away. While I try to be careful and not put anything in the back of my truck that will fly out, other people aren't so careful. I end up with everything from mcdonald's cups to boxes of used diapers, to week old Applebees To-Go bags (with food). None of which are mine, all of which are prone to flying out of my bed at random trajectories. And no, I'm not going to bring other people's trash into my cab.

The generalization that can be made is if you're behind a pickup, dump truck, or some sort of giant motorized bucket, assume stuff will fly out of it and you'll have to make some Starfox-esque moves to avoid it. Just because you're in a different lane doesn't save you. Stuff blows around in circles until a crosswind catches it and blows it out.

As a newb who hasn't been on his first road ride yet, great thread. Thanks for the input guys!
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I got a feeling the KTM would be like a hot girlfriend so fun to be with just not trust worthy.
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Old 04-05-2010, 09:03 AM   #95
dwoodward
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All due respect for Sink for bringing them up- but some examples of what I meant by "generalize" follow. A few broad rules are a lot easier to remember than a bunch of specific ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sink
If your behind a car at a red light don't be on the bumper of the car in front. Stay a bit behind and to the side. Keep an eye on your mirrors. If someone is coming up fast you can move around the car in front of you and let him hit that

Always have an escape route.

Quote:
On the interstate don't ride the right lane. Idiots that aren't paying attention will say, wow thats my exit and cut across the lanes sometimes,and people getting on usually just pull on withoutlooking, figuring other drivers will make way
Maintain a space cushion.

Quote:
When raining don't ride in the middle of the lane. Thats where all the oil is.
Avoid surface hazards

Quote:
When turning tightly at low speeds lightly ride the rear brake.
Know your machine. Not all bikes are graceful about this (think linked brakes)
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Old 04-05-2010, 11:12 AM   #96
Gitana
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Buy a copy of Dave Hough's book, "Proficient Motorcycling". I re-read it occasionally.

If you haven't been riding in a few weeks or months, do some practice drills in a parking lot, especially quick stops.

Keep you bike in gear at Stop signs/red lights rather than in neutral. If you see someone coming up fast behind you and need to get out of the way, that one second it takes to get into first gear and go can make all the difference.

Manhole covers are slippery. So is the white paint used for crosswalks.

Do not turn your wheel and brake at the same time. You will fall over. And it's very embarassing.

Learn how to pick up your bike by yourself. There is nothing worse than dropping your bike and having to get someone to help you lift it up, especially when no one's around.

Keep water and snacks on your bike. On long rides, wear a Camelbak to stay hydrated.

Invest in a really loud horn and don't be afraid to use it.

Watch the front wheels of cars to see if they're starting to turn toward you, into your lane, etc.

Do not ride in a car's blind spot. For that matter, don't ride next to cars any longer than necessary.

If you commute by bike, wear bright colored gear or buy a reflective vest. Some people will say you look like a dork; I really don't give a shit as long as I'm highly visible.

If you don't know a road, stay at the posted speed limit around turns.

Don't cheap out on your gear. Wear ATGATT even if you're just running down the block to the store.

Assume that all cage drivers are the enemy and must be avoided at all costs.

Do not ride when you are tired, angry, upset, under the influence or are not able to focus your full attention on riding. Zone out on a bike at your peril.
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Old 04-05-2010, 11:29 AM   #97
luni
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Noob question:

I see a lot of people talking about the meditative quality of riding a motorcycle, how it helps to unwind and relieve stress from the daily grind.

I also see people comment on not riding when you're tired, pissed off, frustrated, heads-not-right etc.

Now I realize the answer will be almost entirely subjective but hey this is Perfect Line, par for the course. Where do you draw the line? Come home and wife packed up all her shit and some of yours and left the divorce papers on the kitchen table, probably not a good time to ride. Boss chews your ass on the way out the door at work, not so bad.

So to reiterate, where do you draw the line at "to mentally out of it" to ride? Who rides to and from their night shifts? Have you ever been out riding and realized you really weren't in a sound mind to be out on 2 wheels?
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I got a feeling the KTM would be like a hot girlfriend so fun to be with just not trust worthy.
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Old 04-05-2010, 11:51 AM   #98
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For me the answer to that lies in the fact that as long as you are able to control yourself you are good to go if you are not then dont ride.

That means that if your anger afects the way you use the throttle or if you are sleepy enough to become less aware of the road then you should stop. Now there are times when you are angry at something but riding relaxes you and you forget about it, then you are on the right path or lane.
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Old 04-05-2010, 01:16 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
And if you can't bring yourself to "look like a dork" then put even more emphasis on.
Even if.

Hell, I go out of my way to look like a dork. Anyone in Oregon that's seen an FJR rider with a yellow helmet mohawk- that's me. The funny thing is, I know that cagers see it- because they glance in my direction, do a fast double-take, then work very, very hard to not look at me again. The bonus is, they have to know where I am at all times so they can rigidly NOT look at me.

And I don't count on that. Nor do I count on the conspicuity vest I sometimes wear, the hi-viz ballistics on my 'stich, or the eye-searing nuclear puke yellow Fieldsheer jacket I have.

So the difference (as for gear color) betweek DAKEZ and myself is... I'm a dork. I'm OK with that. Parental contractual obligations say I have to do something that's deeply embarassing to the teenagers that live under my roof, anyway, so it might as well be my choice in riding gear.
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Old 04-05-2010, 04:20 PM   #100
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It Will Save Money!

Oh yeah…if you already have a car, you won’t “save money” by buying a motorcycle. Trust me. You might reduce your daily gas expense, but that won’t offset the cost of the bike, maintenance, stuff, more bikes, more stuff…
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Old 04-05-2010, 04:35 PM   #101
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Learned this one about an hour ago...

Don't accidentally hit the engine kill switch when pulling away from cute girl...
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Old 04-05-2010, 04:53 PM   #102
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dont text while you are driving
check your tire pressures before every ride
check you brakelights and turn signal lights
white helmets are more visable
be careful at dawn and dusk for critters
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:18 PM   #103
Sink
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoodward
All due respect for Sink for bringing them up- but some examples of what I meant by "generalize" follow. A few broad rules are a lot easier to remember than a bunch of specific ones.


Always have an escape route.

Maintain a space cushion.


Avoid surface hazards

Know your machine. Not all bikes are graceful about this (think linked brakes)
None taken. Just trying to help out the n00b who started the thread. He did not mention that he wanted generalizations


Just saying maintain a safe cushion does not help if a cager is 3 lanes over and decides to cross all 3 lanes at once. If you are riding 3 lanes over that is a large cushion.


If your just starting out you might not realize what the hazards are.

Not expecting him to remember them all at once.

The same as I would not expect him to remember a complete book on riding. That does not mean it should not be read. Or that it should only be read once.
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:04 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sink
Put weight on your inside peg when cornering.
????
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Old 04-05-2010, 08:39 PM   #105
WhistlingFool
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A few thoughts

I only started riding at 44.. very late.. .but ducks and water...

I like to compare riding well to being in a first person shooter game... what is needed to really suceed is a 360 degree sense of awareness and the ability to anticipate the next encounter... on a bike this means knowing about ALL thr traffic in your sphere... all the lanes behind and ahead of you and the ability to track those targets and scan for and aquire new ones. .. there was a comment about cages darting in front of you on the freeway to get to thier exit... if that catches you by surprise then you aren't really doing all you can.

Always expect people to run red lights, pull out in front of you, doors to pop open on parked cars.. regardless... almost any "event" can be avoided by understanding the environment and what that means to your space on the road... little stuff means a lot... Night time visibility is poor but you also face increases in animal encounters as so many nocturnal ones are out and about...

I highly recommend a basic and then advanced training courses .. also pick a up and or borrow a few MC books.. I am a fan of Total Control by Keith Parks...
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