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Old 12-19-2010, 11:56 AM   #46
Subutai
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 257bob View Post
But I don't like the way it sounds going down the road; it always sounds "dry". Being a mechanic by trade, that really bothers me.
Regular chain lube will do just fine. Don't go destroying your final drive units with some industrial paste.

People tend to over-do the lubing and go for gimmicks, like teflon. Sure, it might add miles to your chain(or not) but is it really worth it? I got tired at the chewing gum like paste which started to form around the rear and front sprocket when using stuff with teflon in it. Cost about twice as much as your regular lube and did not seem to do anything different or better.

I usually spray the chain sparingly with regular chain lube and wipe the excess off, if the chain looks dry. By dry I mean if it has collected rust on the outer side or the seals look dry. If you have chain lube on your rim or fairings you're using too much.
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Old 12-19-2010, 12:59 PM   #47
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What do you mean by "regular chain lube"? I have a can of the Repsol stuff here that smells suspiciously like differential grease. I was using that on the wife's bike and her chain runs nearly silent.

What's the difference between what you use and regular old 30 wt.?
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Old 12-19-2010, 01:04 PM   #48
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The yellowish comes in a spray can lube with adhesive you find in almost any auto parts store. CRC makes one, Motul has one, probably all the big lubricant manufacturers have their own.

If by 30 wt. you mean engine oil or similar I think you can accomplish this quite good also. It just tends to sling off when it has warmed tho. Bet you could use your change oil to lube your chain, if you change your engine oil according to the manufacturers specs I don't believe it is even near the end of it's service life. The slinging part, well, just need to lube more often.
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Old 12-19-2010, 02:01 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by 257bob View Post
I have given that some thought and it's the one thing that really holds me back.

Question: Does sand stick to an oily chain? Seems to me the only thing sand (or anything else) wouldn't stick to is a dry chain.

What's the oiler going to do, add enough oil to keep debris flushed off? Sounds quite messy to me...
Speaking as a guy beginning the process of cleaning accumulated munge off of his chain, sprockets, and nearby components, yes sand and dirt stick to accumulated oil.

OTOH, I use a Scottoiler on my VFR750 and I've had the same chain for the past 31k miles (almost, but not exclusively, pavement). I assume that it's the OEM chain on there, so it's going on 42k miles now. Also, I never had more than a couple of drops on the garage floor, an these were only intermittent, rather than something that happened every time I parked. I've never used spray-on lube, nor brushed it on a motorcycle chain, but if that process drips as much as lubing my bicycle chain did, well the overspray is probably about the same amount of oil on the ground as what my Scottoiler dropped.

I'm very, very pleased with the performance of the Scottoiler system, and while I'd probably go with the Pro-oiler were I to do it again, I'm certainly not going to take the Scott off of the bike.
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Old 12-19-2010, 03:38 PM   #50
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Well, you certainly can't argue with those numbers. Pretty impressive.
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Old 12-19-2010, 06:54 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Motoriley View Post
Looks like a cheap alternative to the other oilers except if you forget to turn it off it will drain out on your garage floor....
Yeah if you leave it on the reserviour will empty itself onto the floor... but then again, you also have to remember to take your keys out. It only holds about 8 to 10ml of oil so its not that big a deal if you do forget. I like the fact that you can adjust it on the fly and it doesn't need to be wired into your bike anywhere.

On using old engine oil for lubing your chain... I suppose you could. The thing that would bother me, though, is any contaminants such as small particles of metal and acidic buildup of combustion by-products interfereing with your chain. Easier to just use new oil IMO, and you don't use very much.

Cheers - boingk
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Old 12-21-2010, 12:28 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by 257bob View Post
Well, you certainly can't argue with those numbers. Pretty impressive.
Yeah, it's pretty cool. AFAICT, if you double the life of your chain and sprockets, you will have paid for even the most expensive automatic oiler on the market, since both cost between $150-200 (provided your chain and sprockets cost that much; I recall those for my VFR do, but it's a street bike).

The best thing about the oiler, in my experience, is that I don't have to spend the time or effort lubing my chain. I also have never had to adjust the chain after installing the oiler. I check it occasionally and it's always in spec. Saving that time and effort is worth quite a bit in my book.

fwiw, I'm hawking an unused-but-upened scottoiler touring reservoir in the flea market, if anyone's interested. PM or something.
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Old 12-21-2010, 03:13 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by hpsVFR View Post

fwiw, I'm hawking an unused-but-upened scottoiler touring reservoir in the flea market, if anyone's interested. PM or something.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=642165

so, will this fit on the tail area of a us spec bike or not?
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allonsye screwed with this post 12-21-2010 at 03:18 PM
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Old 12-21-2010, 10:46 PM   #54
hpsVFR
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=642165

so, will this fit on the tail area of a us spec bike or not?
It should. If I get a chance in the next couple of days I'll see about mounting it behind my plate and getting pics.

I've also seen one install on a VFR of my vintage where they trimmed the flange of the reservoir down to the bare minimum (it's wide enough now to hold the scottoiler metering valve next to the touring reservoir), and then mounting it inset into the rear mudguard. On a modern bike, or one without a mudguard (people like to take them off, I've heard ) this method might not work.

I've also seen some other mounting options for it, but it's shape does put certain limits. I could probably tell you more if you told me what bike you have. You choose which thread is more appropriate and I'll try to get back to you ASAP.
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:42 AM   #55
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I just ordered the loobman, looks like it will do the trick just fine. I'm one of those nutty chan lubers, I use synthetic spray every 200 or less miles, 11k so far and adjusted four times.
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:11 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by hpsVFR View Post
It should. If I get a chance in the next couple of days I'll see about mounting it behind my plate and getting pics.

I've also seen one install on a VFR of my vintage where they trimmed the flange of the reservoir down to the bare minimum (it's wide enough now to hold the scottoiler metering valve next to the touring reservoir), and then mounting it inset into the rear mudguard. On a modern bike, or one without a mudguard (people like to take them off, I've heard ) this method might not work.

I've also seen some other mounting options for it, but it's shape does put certain limits. I could probably tell you more if you told me what bike you have. You choose which thread is more appropriate and I'll try to get back to you ASAP.
I'm knocking about ideas for my Weestrom. Having the oil resevoir behind the tag seems and excellent idea.

With the exception of the Loobman. Everything else on the market seems bloody expensive for what they are I'm considering penny-teching my own:
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Old 12-23-2010, 10:48 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by Whoam View Post
I just ordered the loobman, looks like it will do the trick just fine. I'm one of those nutty chan lubers, I use synthetic spray every 200 or less miles, 11k so far and adjusted four times.
If you are able, please post about your install and thoughts on product.
thanks
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Old 12-23-2010, 11:22 AM   #58
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I don't have new pictures yet, but I did take some measurements. The threaded brass inserts at the corners of the reservoir are 5 7/8" apart. There is another set of holes without brass inserts which are 4 1/2" from one set of brass inserts and 1 3/8" from the other.

When I get pics, I'll update my FM post and notify people here too.

fwiw, I'm very interested in the idea of using a vacuum-operated fuel petcock as a valve (you should be able to get rough flow adjustment by partially-opening the valve), with which you could use any reservoir you liked.

I already built my own dual-tip nozzle for the chain end, made from two athletic ball inflator needles, some brass tubing, copper wire, and JB-weld. It seems to work pretty well and it's held up for 20k miles. It's a pretty simple thing, but it's a lot nicer (IMO) than the drip-tube that came with the Scottoiler.
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Old 12-23-2010, 01:48 PM   #59
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Thumb Home made chain oilers

I've too have been trying to find some good ideas for a home made - as in cheap - chain oiler.

There is some good information at http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/bodgers-corner/ by other people who are trying the same thing. Some of them have come up with some pretty innovative ideas! You should read several different threads over there.

Small electric(12v) valves are available on ebay, I like the idea of being able to turn the oiler off with the ignition. Then there's a flow controlling valve using a valve for a fish-tank air system, and a football inflating tip, all connected together with small bore tubing again from the fish tank people. One rider makes up a double tip using two small zip-tie ends and some heat shrink tubing that is brilliant, I think!

I haven't come up with a reservoir idea yet, but I suspect I'll find one at Walmart, where they sell small plastic bottles for travel amounts of shampoo, etc.

I think the thing to work for is to have the shut-off valve as far down on the line as possible, so there won't be much left in the line after you turn off the engine.

Anyway, this is a great cold weather project for the cheap inventors amongst us. Good luck!
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Old 12-23-2010, 02:04 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hpsVFR View Post
(snip) I'm very interested in the idea of using a vacuum-operated fuel petcock as a valve (you should be able to get rough flow adjustment by partially-opening the valve), with which you could use any reservoir you liked.

I already built my own dual-tip nozzle for the chain end, made from two athletic ball inflator needles, some brass tubing, copper wire, and JB-weld. It seems to work pretty well and it's held up for 20k miles. It's a pretty simple thing, but it's a lot nicer (IMO) than the drip-tube that came with the Scottoiler.
I'm not cheap. I am frugal. I value my time as well. W/the exception of the Loobman, the other available kits/offerings seem a bit high priced costs and engineering considered. So, I'm thinking penny tech -- homemade -- DIY.

I love the idea of a vacuum operated petcock! For flow control, you could simply add another valve downstream.

I've been looking at everything that's out there (including the homemade setups) and for simplicity's sake, I think gravity feed is the way to go with a vacuum controlled valve. The electric pump idea is good from the standpoint of being able to place a resevoir anywhere and not rely on gravity to feed. But then what do you do w/the residual in the line as Denis mentioned above?
The Loobman approaches this by filling the line before you start riding -- assuming your ride long enough till it's emptied.

Your dual needle valve sounds real good. Any chance we could see some detailed pics of it?
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