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Old 12-23-2010, 04:53 PM   #61
hpsVFR
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Originally Posted by allonsye View Post
I've been looking at everything that's out there (including the homemade setups) and for simplicity's sake, I think gravity feed is the way to go with a vacuum controlled valve. The electric pump idea is good from the standpoint of being able to place a resevoir anywhere and not rely on gravity to feed.
If you choose the right pump, you can build in a control for the amount of oil metered out (as the Pro-oiler does). This is handy if you change riding environments regularly and need to change the oil flow to compensate for that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by allonsye View Post
But then what do you do w/the residual in the line as Denis mentioned above?
If your tube is fairly small, and your metering tip is quite small, then capillary forces, combined with a good seal at the top of the line, prevents air from getting in. If no air can slide in at the tip and work it's way up the line, no oil will fall out.

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Originally Posted by allonsye View Post
Your dual needle valve sounds real good. Any chance we could see some detailed pics of it?
I did take pictures, but I'm not sure if they're still online. I'll see what I can do.
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Old 12-23-2010, 07:39 PM   #62
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Pro oiler, that is what "warchild"recommends, and he is the tech inspector for the iron butt association, so he should know.
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Old 12-24-2010, 06:12 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by imjinscout View Post
Pro oiler, that is what "warchild"recommends, and he is the tech inspector for the iron butt association, so he should know.
It's huge money. Nevertheless probably worth it. I've been considering this one and the Cameleon. Both have gotten very good reviews.
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Old 01-05-2011, 02:10 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by allonsye
Originally Posted by allonsye
Your dual needle valve sounds real good. Any chance we could see some detailed pics of it?
Just a notice that I've not forgotten about this stuff. I got delayed though, by an unexpected trip out of town for a family emergency. I'll get on it as soon as things quiet down here, and post to this thread when I've got pics uploaded.
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Old 01-05-2011, 03:39 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by allonsye View Post
nt of being able to place a resevoir anywhere and not rely on gravity to feed. But then what do you do w/the residual in the line as Denis mentioned above?
Its not a problem for the pump/valve systems, with the end sealed the vacuum holds the fluid in. Just like when you put your finger over the end of a straw and the drink will stay inside until you release your finger.

Smaller tubes work better (especially when horizontal), but can have trouble flowing in cold weather if too thin. Pumps get around that since they force the correct amount of oil through regardless of viscosity.

I have the pro oiler on my DL650 and am extremely happy with it. Though I tend to run it on the "rich" side anyway (I like the chain clean and glistening with oil) so a basic Scottoiler would be giving just as good results.
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Old 01-17-2011, 10:09 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by allonsye View Post
[in reply to a post of mine about a pennytech dual-tip oiler I made one day]
Your dual needle valve sounds real good. Any chance we could see some detailed pics of it?
This should be enough to give you an idea of what I made:


I may have used solid brass rod and a thread-cutting die to make the threaded portion, or I might have used a brass machine-screw with the head cut off and some sort of sealant (probably JB-Weld, if I did). Basically it's solid brass with a threaded portion sticking out of a brass tube, and I don't remember how I arrived at that result. I do know that my tools were all hand-held.

The tube has the other end plugged with something-or-other (again, probably JB-Weld, but perhaps something else). I drilled three holes into the tube, the end ones in the same plane, and the center one offset somewhat. The idea was to have the center hole be the 'feed' and for it to be more-or-less vertical when the oiler tips were directed at the sprocket. I just did all this by hand at my desk one night, so it's 'close', but obviously not really precision.

The tips are standard athletic needle inflators, with the ends filed off. I used copper transformer wire to hold them to the tube and to provide a matrix for the JB-Weld when it was applied... looking at the picture again, there might be another, smaller-diameter, bit of brass tubing involved, between the inflator needle and the log tube, because there appears to be an awfully long distance between the chrome and the log tube. I honestly don't recall anymore.

The 'feed' line is probably a barb fitting of some sort, but I honestly cannot remember specifically what I used. I attached it in the same way as the oiler tips.

Everything there is easily available from any hardware store, and while I'd do it a bit differently if I had to make another (I'd use a drill-press rather than a hand-held bit, for example), it does the job...so long as I remember to fill the reservoir with oil.

I may have better pictures somewhere, but this is what I've got at hand. I'm happy to talk more about this, and if people want more pics, I may even get out there and take some. I need an excuse to get under the bike and clean more of the collected ooge off of it anyway.
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Old 01-18-2011, 08:51 AM   #67
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[QUOTE=hpsVFR;14968724]This should be enough to give you an idea of what I made:


thanks for remembering to follow up
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Old 01-18-2011, 10:31 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vatrader01 View Post
What type and brand of chain are you buying? I am on a mission to see how long I can make this chain go:

http://www.vstroma.com/ChainSuperLinks.html

I'm running this brand and type of chain on a KLR 650. I have right at 16,000 miles on it, and no sign of wear on the sprockets, and the chain performs as it was intended. I have been running a tad on the loose side...not much, but loose enough that I am tempted to take it up a titch...but I leave it alone. It is not dangerous or overly loose. I ride about 60 / 40 on asphalt / dirt roads. Water crossings. Nasty old red clay.
I have been anal about cleaning this chain. I use diesel fuel and a parts brush with a cut out oil jug under the rear sprocket. I wash and rinse until I detect no more gritty substance on the chain. Then a two mile run up the road to heat up the chain, and I apply Automatic Transmission Fluid to the chain for lube. Everything indicates that this chain has a lot of life left in it.
Based on your description of your riding habits, I would focus on the tension aspect of the chain. With all due respect, I don't see the power available to the rear wheel of a DL650 as a given chain eater. The roads can be rough as the neighborhoods in northern Mississippi, but not Dakar tough. The enemy of a chain is dirt, heat, and tension. And misalignment.
I know a guy that has over 30,000 on his DL1000 factory chain, with no indication that there will be issues anytime soon. He does keep his chain cleaner than most peoples teeth.


what he said gets my vote !!!
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Old 01-19-2011, 06:44 AM   #69
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what he said gets my vote !!!
DON'T FORGET what else he said, "run the chain on the loose side"! Running a chain too tight will ruin it quicker than you can say your name. I think the Suzuki spec it a bit on the tight side.

I'm at 22k on current chain/sprocketts and looks like I'll go another 8k. I simply spray it down w/Dupont Teflon Lube and wipe it down every 500 mi or so.

I am looking to install some sort of chain oiler but have not tackled the project yet. After a long day of touring, I don't feel like having to "F" with anything. An auto oiler is the way to go.
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Old 01-19-2011, 07:25 AM   #70
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Pro oiler. I loved mine on my VFR. No drips, adjust on the fly, easy to fill, double nozzle, bottle lasts for many 1000s of miles. If I ever have another chain bike I will buy another, that is, if I ever decide to sell the pro oiler I took off the VFR.

A link to my install and a review
http://www.vfrdiscussion.com/forum/i..._1#entry561499

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Old 01-19-2011, 11:30 AM   #71
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Prooiler is hugely expensive.

I was looking at the PDoiler and the Motooiler which are similar but 1/2 the cost.
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Old 01-19-2011, 03:39 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by allonsye View Post
Prooiler is hugely expensive.

I was looking at the PDoiler and the Motooiler which are similar but 1/2 the cost.
It is not cheap; but, it is a high quality well made product that works....Gotta love that
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:22 PM   #73
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dupont general purpose teflon lube. Bought at lowes. Costs 1/2 what a motorcycle specific lube costs and will double your chain life.

I just rolled over 50,000 miles on my chain and it still isn't stretched to its limit, no stif links, and looks like a new chain.

nothing keeps your chain cleaner.
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Old 01-20-2011, 07:13 AM   #74
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to autolube or not to autolube

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Originally Posted by stretch160 View Post
dupont general purpose teflon lube. Bought at lowes. Costs 1/2 what a motorcycle specific lube costs and will double your chain life.

I just rolled over 50,000 miles on my chain and it still isn't stretched to its limit, no stif links, and looks like a new chain.

nothing keeps your chain cleaner.
Looks like your doing all the right stuff to include enough slack to keep your chain healthy Stretch. Like I was saying above -- has worked for me for years too.

Again, it's just those long trips. Tired after 3 - 400 mi day in the saddle, the last thing I want to do is get on my knees on the ground to lube a chain, i'm thinkin more of and ready to . In the morning when it's time to hit the road early, it's a part of the trip prep I'd like to eliminate -- spend time otherwise. Enough reason to have an autoluber to me.

I pulled the trigger on a PDoiler on ebay yesterday. I'll do a write up on it in the spring.
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Old 01-21-2011, 06:01 AM   #75
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Originally Posted by Jamie Z View Post
... A1fa showed me his way, which was to put the bike on the center stand, start it, and put it in first gear. He'd let the bike spin the rear tire and spray lube all over the chain until it was dripping off. I've used his method for this most recent chain, and I do it every fillup, or roughly 250 miles.
didn't we see this link before?
http://www.gixxer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=242261
beware very graphic
but clearly shows why I will NOT lube my chain A1fa's way
I'll rather buy a new chain thousand miles earlier
new fingers are hard to come by these days
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