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Old 01-09-2015, 07:33 PM   #1
broncobowsher OP
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Sherco headlight wiring

So I am looking at the 2 plugs for the original 2012 headlight wiring, thinking about hooking up some heated grips.

OK, no heated grips
But Santa did bring a nice little Rigid LED light that I plan to stick on the bike for some summer practice. It is hard to get a little peg time in the AZ summers. I like to go run around the back yard a little bit after work. This time of year it is perfect. Come summer I have to wait until after dark. And that stock headlight is one of the most useless things I have ever seen.

Now I have 2 plugs, 4 wires in total. I have found mostly AC voltages (Don't care, I can fix that) but there is enough strange stuff going on I want to see how this is wired up. I see 5V, 9V, and 15V depending on which wires I am referencing. I thought it would be a power and ground at one plug and the other would go back to the non-existent tail light. But this stuff isn't adding up right.

Female plug
Brown and Yellow wires

Male plug
Brown and Yellow with green tracer

I should have written down what wires were doing what be decided the more pressing item was to just start riding the bike around instead. At the rate I get around to projects, I need to get started on this so I have a chance of getting it done by summer.
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Old 01-10-2015, 07:45 AM   #2
motobene
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I think I gave my wiring diagram up when I sold my 2002 Sherco. I recall Yellow was the 12V wire. You know the magneto produces AC, and the lighting rectifier used with the light and sometimes also the fan does not produce a really clean DC. It's a dirty, semi DC. LED controllers may not like dirty power?

There is a major revolution in lighting just sitting there waiting for trials riders, knock on the head with hollow wood sounds, to figure out, or not. Too stinking hot to ride or compete in the day in summer? Ride at night!
Were no longer in tungsten headlight world Toto! For little money you can blast the world around you with light, and the battery will last longer on one charge probably way longer than you'll want to ride.

A light on the bike to light up what's in front a little is good, but the best place to put an LED light is on top of your helmet. I often ride with an Osprey pack to have water and snacks. A battery easily will fit in that pack so all that is on the helmet is the LED light, or two.

Consider we mere humans can buy blasters like this for only 40 bucks:

http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?...llow&cId=PDIO1

My son used one of these many hours in my wilderness property. He and his cousin went up over a nearby mountain, night bouldering. I stayed in camp. My son enjoyed repeatedly lighting me up in camp from 300 feet up and 3,000 feet away!

There are many components available to build your own systems.

This area is SO important with so much potential, I'm going to start a stand-alone thread on LED lighting.
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Old 02-14-2015, 07:02 PM   #3
broncobowsher OP
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Well I dug into it a little further today. I think the brown wire is ground. The yellow power to the headlight. Yellow and green power to the non-existent tail light. The two plugs at the headlight look like they can be plugged into each other to allow the non-existing tail light to be powered with the headlight missing.

I'm going to find the original headlight (I think I know where it is stashed) and confirm. I really hate messing with wiring that doesn't have a clear diagram of what it does. I tend to spend lots of time reverse engineering simple things just to make sure I don't screw something up.
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Old 02-14-2015, 09:19 PM   #4
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OK, that's not it.

Found the original headlight. Yellow and brown go to the switch and nothing else. Yellow with green and brown go to the lights. More meter checks needed. The brown should just be a carrier, but I thought I measured something on that wire when it shouldn't be connected to anything.

How is installing a light so difficult?
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Old 02-21-2015, 11:25 AM   #5
motobene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broncobowsher View Post
OK, that's not it.

Found the original headlight. Yellow and brown go to the switch and nothing else. Yellow with green and brown go to the lights. More meter checks needed. The brown should just be a carrier, but I thought I measured something on that wire when it shouldn't be connected to anything.

How is installing a light so difficult?
I found my `02 Sherco photos!

I did an article years ago on simplifying the wiring of the Shercos by remaking the original harness. Basically getting rid of the big switch and lights and cleaning up the gaggle of wires. I did the following on Photoshop for you of the original setup from the factory. I see I failed to arrow to the voltage regulator, but I describe where it is:



The typical design is AC power comes from the magneto, like a yellow wire,
which is unregulated AC voltage depending on RPM. This fluctuating voltage AV gets modified when plugged into the Transval voltage regulator that sits on top of the blue coil and digital ignition. The regulator simply cuts off the voltage peaks above 14V or so. The very same yellow wire branches off to the fan switch and the lights through the big switch thing.

The lights run on directly on regulated AC without getting any DC smoothing from the fan rectifier.

The fan switch turns the regulated AC on and off to the fan voltage regulator via the red wire from the switch. The regulator is ground by the yellow-green wire to the frame. Coming out of the fan regulator is some semblance of smooth DC power to the fan via the black (ground) wire and blue power wire.

It's really quite simple.

If your Sherco wiring was already simplified it won't look like in the photo, but once you understand how things work you can figure it out. I used some of the wiring harness to simplify things. In one spot I might have used a different color wire on the same circuit to get use of a handy connector... can't remember. If someone followed my article they might have done the same.

The important thing for the light is simply that you are using the AC yellow wire to power the light, and it will have on that same circuit the voltage regulator. If you use no light switch, the yellow wire simply goes to the light and the other light wire to the frame ground. If I use lights I like to put a toggle switch right on the light shroud and switch the incoming power.

motobene screwed with this post 02-21-2015 at 11:32 AM
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Old 02-21-2015, 07:19 PM   #6
broncobowsher OP
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Looks like things have not changed much in a decade. Thanks for the pic and description.
After cleaning up a chunk of the garage to reach the storage box I got the original headlight out. Plugged it all in and fired up the bike.
Yellow is unregulated AC. That appears to be the same as the '02. I saw about 14V at idle and a quick wing of the throttle brought it a shade over 20V.
Brown is a traveler. It is the switched voltage. No conditioning, as it comes out of the switch and into the lights. There is a splice somewhere in the harness to split the feed for and aft.
Yellow with green tracer is ground.

I can see yellow and red at the fan switch, that is the same but I think the connector changed a little. I'm really trying to avoid taking the whole bike apart. I was about to cut and splice the wires for the light. Got out my weatherpack kit. Forgot I used up the last of the 2-cavity shells on a solar project. So putting together an order tonight. Hopefully it will be here by the end of the week. I would like to try it this coming weekend.

Just double checked on the Rigid website. The lights will run on 9-36V DC (but not AC). I'm sticking with my plan to just run a rectifier to change the AC to (dirty) DC. Not going to worry about voltage regulation or filtering to clean DC. Looks like the light will handle that for me. From the playing with revving the engine I don't really see the voltage going over 36V. The fairly good wing of the throttle only went up 5V. That still leaves another 15V before upper voltage limit. I don't see that happening, especially at night.

I realized I have had this light on the shelf for a year now. Almost installed now.
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Old 02-21-2015, 09:32 PM   #7
motobene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broncobowsher View Post
Yellow is unregulated AC. That appears to be the same as the '02. I saw about 14V at idle and a quick wing of the throttle brought it a shade over 20V.
How is it the voltage is getting as high as 20VAC? Are you measuring the voltage with the yellow wire also connected to the voltage regulator, or just direct form the magneto? I'm assuming things here, as in the regulator keeping the voltage from spiking that high... because I've never actually measured the voltage on a trials bike. It's something I now know I need to do.
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Old 02-22-2015, 01:46 PM   #8
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Have no idea why. It is just what the meter shows. From what little info exists there isn't any regulator until you get to the cooling fan rectifier.

I went ahead and wired the light today and ran it in the garage with the lights off. I don't think it is all that happy with dirty DC. I'm going to rummage through my parts and find a decent cap and put that on the DC side of the rectifier (the one I added to the light, not the one for the fan).
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Old 02-23-2015, 07:34 AM   #9
motobene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broncobowsher View Post
Have no idea why. It is just what the meter shows. From what little info exists there isn't any regulator until you get to the cooling fan rectifier.

I went ahead and wired the light today and ran it in the garage with the lights off. I don't think it is all that happy with dirty DC. I'm going to rummage through my parts and find a decent cap and put that on the DC side of the rectifier (the one I added to the light, not the one for the fan).
Given it's a single-phase alternator, I suspect it's a sort of coarse grain sand dirty.
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