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Old 06-17-2010, 06:05 PM   #1
DmsFab OP
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Colorado to Alaska: Summer of 2011

So I am in the very early stages on planning a 3400-ish mile trip From Colorado to Alaska. I want to stick to mostly single track trails where possible. This will be a solo trip, just me, a KLX300r and whatever gear I can carry. I plan to start in Florence CO(were I live) and follow some trails to Westcliff and get on the Rainbow Trail. I will take RBT as far north as I can and still stay in the "wilderness". Once I get off the RBT, I have no idea where I will go from there. That is where you all come into play. I want to do this "old skool" EI: paper maps, local knowledge ect. Obviously I will be doing alot of research into the trails and there difficulty. I have a pretty high-level of skill on the trail so the trails can be fairly difficult. Besides, this is a challenge and I dont want to be easy. I would rather fail at something that is very difficult then to succeed at something easy.

I guess what I am asking is this:
1: trails! I need ideas of good trails that will not make me back-track
2: fuel stops. I am going to equip the bike to run about 200 miles before fueling stops.
3: locals with good info on the trails
4: maps! I will be looking into buying good maps of the areas I want to cross thru. No GPS here!
5: Maybe people to ride with on SHORT sections of trails.

Any ideas and suggestions are welcome. There are still alot of legistics to work out but like I said, I am in the very earlier stages of planning. My basic shedule is to leave Florence between June 1st and the 15th of next year(2011) and try to average about 60 to 100 miles a day. I plan to travel 7 days a week, not more then 16 hours a day. I know what you are says, that is an immpossibly lofty goal. I think so too but it give me a good goal to set my sights on.

The next thing to think about is the bike. I already own a 2000 KLX300R. I love the bike and it is very light weight. I am a short guy(5'5") and the kLX fits me well. I am looking into maybe purchasing a DR650. I have looked into KLRs and KTMs but the KLR is stupid heavy and the KTM is stupid $$$!!!! I think I will just stick with the KLX since the trails I want to stick to are very tight and rough. I dont want to wear myself out in the first few days lugging a huge heavy bike around and having to pick that heavy pig up off the ground in the event of an off. The hardest part I can think of is hauling enough gear and fuel on a bike so small. Obviously there are a whole lot of things I can not take with me. My main storage space will be taken up buy food, water and shelter.

Anyways, enough for now, I will be putting alot of thought into this over the next few months and we willl see where this goes. Thanks in advance for any advice, suggestions and help you can provide. Thank you

Jeff

DmsFab screwed with this post 06-17-2010 at 07:00 PM
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Old 06-17-2010, 06:15 PM   #2
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Here is an idea of "route" I'd like to take, staying mostly in the mountains and will the least amount of pavement I can. I really dont even want to travel on improved gravel roads. Unimproved gravel is on the borderline for me. The only real stop that I want to make is in Metaline Falls, WA. Other then that, my route is in your hands!


Opps, I forgot to mention, the red line is my route and the blue line is the highway route that Google suggested.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:13 PM   #3
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While there are some nice trails in the northern U.S. and southern B.C., once you get into northern B.C., Yukon, and Alaska you will be pretty much restricted to established roads, but at least you can find ones that aren't paved, such as the Campbell Hwy through Ross River, the Taylor Hwy (with a side trip to Eagle, AK, the Denali Hwy, and Hatcher Pass, near Palmer, AK. There are trails off these roads, but they require backtracking once you get to the end.

For instance, unless you will be taking a ferry or plane to one of the communities in the Southeast Panhandle of Alaska, you will be traveling a paved highway between Tetlin Jct and Tok shortly after you enter Alaska. And for the rest of your travels in Alaska it will be pretty much the same. You can take a few detours that will allow travel on gravel roads to bypass paved highways, but eventually will have to be back on asphalt to get to the next stretch of gravel. To travel trails up here, you have to wait until the swamps, rivers, and streams are frozen and covered with snow, and have a vehicle with (a) track(s) or is measured in dogpower rather than horsepower.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcan Rider
While there are some nice trails in the northern U.S. and southern B.C., once you get into northern B.C., Yukon, and Alaska you will be pretty much restricted to established roads, but at least you can find ones that aren't paved, such as the Campbell Hwy through Ross River, the Taylor Hwy (with a side trip to Eagle, AK, the Denali Hwy, and Hatcher Pass, near Palmer, AK. There are trails off these roads, but they require backtracking once you get to the end.

For instance, unless you will be taking a ferry or plane to one of the communities in the Southeast Panhandle of Alaska, you will be traveling a paved highway between Tetlin Jct and Tok shortly after you enter Alaska. And for the rest of your travels in Alaska it will be pretty much the same. You can take a few detours that will allow travel on gravel roads to bypass paved highways, but eventually will have to be back on asphalt to get to the next stretch of gravel. To travel trails up here, you have to wait until the swamps, rivers, and streams are frozen and covered with snow, and have a vehicle with (a) track(s) or is measured in dogpower rather than horsepower.


That is what I kind of figured. Once I cross into Canada, I think I will be mostly of dirt roads with the occasional trail from "here to there" I pretty much knew I would not be doing to much trail riding in AK since it is all bogs and permafrost. I mainly want to stay to the trails until I get into Canada where it is not possible or to unsafe to be on a trail by myself. The thought of having an incounter with a bear or mountain lion does not thrill me!
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