ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 2 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 01-15-2014, 10:29 PM   #1
discochris OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
discochris's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Sometimes the Twin Cities, Sometimes NW Wisconsin
Oddometer: 1,232
woodburning fireplace inserts

I know there are a few threads on here about wood stoves, but this question is a little different. We have an open hearth fireplace in our house. Very cool looking, and I use it several nights a week (including right now), but it's of course completely inefficient.

Have any of you put in an enclosed wood burning insert into an open hearth fireplace to make it more efficient? I don't want to go with a gas fireplace - we had two in our last house, and while they're nice for heating to some extent, I really like having a wood burning fireplace.

Any suggestions, costs, drawbacks I should know about? Just doing some googling, they seem awfully expensive.
discochris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2014, 11:12 PM   #2
soewe812
Wag more Bark less
 
soewe812's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Springville, Utah
Oddometer: 999
Find a Buck stove insert and never look back.
soewe812 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 06:27 AM   #3
Dave
Huh?
 
Dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: 12 mile circle
Oddometer: 2,748
They are expensive, and Mrs. Dave and I choked at the initial price, but 18 mos. later, we're pretty happy with our purchase.

We got a Jotul C350 Winterport.
We were going to go with the C550, but it was a just a little too large for the fireplace opening, and I didn't feel like getting a mason in to modify things. it was a good thing we went with the smaller unit, because it turns out to be a lot better suited to our house. When we get the 350 rolling, and the fans turned up, the room it's in can get quite warm. When it gets below freezing outside, it does take a big load off of the furnace, keeping our utility bills nice and low. If we got the 550, I think that part of the house would get too hot. if we had an open floor plan, perhaps not.

I think the only down side is that when we have a fire lit, our three dogs sit right in front of the insert and refuse to move.
Dave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 06:27 AM   #4
Yooper_Bob
Beastly Adventurer
 
Yooper_Bob's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: Da UP, eh! (Michigan)
Oddometer: 2,565
At our old house, there was a really nice fireplace in the finished basement. Only one problem...it sucked more heat out of the house when burning, than when just sitting there cold.

I installed a low priced steel insert, and instant heat! It provided enough heat to just about heat the entire house.

A quality insert will definitely make a huge difference. Be sure to get one with a blower, and the max size you can fit.

Steel ones will be the least expensive. Cast iron are the next price level, and soapstone the most expensive. Figure out how much you will use it, and invest accordingly.
Yooper_Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 11:08 AM   #5
nephron
countercurrent exchanger
 
nephron's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: SW Oregon
Oddometer: 227
We have a Hampton something something, use it daily in the winter. It works very well and I would reccomended, although a) the inlet damper is kind of on or off, b) I wish the firebox were a little bigger, and c) outside air intake would be a nice option, though not a big deal.
nephron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 11:16 AM   #6
LLpeteJ
Pie Eater
 
LLpeteJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Oddometer: 120
Things to consider are that you will also have to reline the chimney from the insert to the top of the chimney with a stainless liner that is insulated with a ceramic wool blanket. The prices vary quite a bit between stoves and installation costs. Lets just say somewhere between 4000 and 6500 for a proper set up depending on the stove you choose, chimney height and the difficulty of installation.
PS dont let some hack put the liner in with out insulation as it is very common,
__________________
I'd rather be riding a Asian girl.
LLpeteJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 11:17 AM   #7
Bigmak
Bornagin Realist
 
Bigmak's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Vaderson, Washingon
Oddometer: 16,502
Put one in last year, removing a propane insert. Had to cut out the damper to run the 6" stainless pipe. I think everything was under $1,500, from an online company back in your area.
__________________
You're not ignorant, you just know so much that isn't true. RR

The Mak is right. There. I said it. I agreed with the Mak. Lobby
Bigmak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 12:06 PM   #8
spiffious
Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Mason Dixon
Oddometer: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLpeteJ View Post
Things to consider are that you will also have to reline the chimney from the insert to the top of the chimney with a stainless liner that is insulated with a ceramic wool blanket. The prices vary quite a bit between stoves and installation costs. Lets just say somewhere between 4000 and 6500 for a proper set up depending on the stove you choose, chimney height and the difficulty of installation.
PS dont let some hack put the liner in with out insulation as it is very common,
Why is the flue insulation so important? Our installer did not include insulation, but we have a full liner. The chimney is fully on the interior of the house, so its not exposed as badly to outside temps.

We have a hampton insert. It fits lots of wood, and with the fan on can heat most of our 1950's single story home, even without an overly open floorplan. My only gripe is that it is real hard to get an overnight burn unless I pack it to the gills and damper in all the way then pull it back out a hair.

http://www.regency-fire.com/Products...rts/HI300.aspx
spiffious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 12:52 PM   #9
BillsR100
Happy Paleoflatus
 
BillsR100's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma
Oddometer: 2,817
I'm looking for an insert myself, we use our traditional open fireplace a lot.
We had one once a long time ago at a previous house and we were so disappointed with it we've balked at getting another one.
I've thought seriously about just getting one of those grate heaters with a blower.

BillsR100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 12:59 PM   #10
Chad05gsa
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Ithaca ny
Oddometer: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by soewe812 View Post
Find a Buck stove insert and never look back.
Parents had of these when I was growing up. Actually due to their age they are selling it, as they made the switch to gas.

But the thing heated a five bedroom house trouble free since 1984 without skipping a beat.

samsung galaxy note 2
Chad05gsa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 01:26 PM   #11
LLpeteJ
Pie Eater
 
LLpeteJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Oddometer: 120
It does not meet minimum code requirements on the chimney liner or the liner manufactures installation instructions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spiffious View Post
Why is the flue insulation so important? Our installer did not include insulation, but we have a full liner. The chimney is fully on the interior of the house, so its not exposed as badly to outside temps.

We have a hampton insert. It fits lots of wood, and with the fan on can heat most of our 1950's single story home, even without an overly open floorplan. My only gripe is that it is real hard to get an overnight burn unless I pack it to the gills and damper in all the way then pull it back out a hair.

http://www.regency-fire.com/Products...rts/HI300.aspx
__________________
I'd rather be riding a Asian girl.
LLpeteJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 01:34 PM   #12
LLpeteJ
Pie Eater
 
LLpeteJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Oddometer: 120
That is what the industry refers to as a slammer (any insert that just slides in and vents through an open fireplace damper) While it may have heated your house well for the last 20 years or so that basic slammer design has been obsolete and considered unfit for use as a wood heating appliance. The professional opinions is that is shall not be used and it doubtful that you will ever find a reputable company to service it as nobody will touch them for liability reasons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad05gsa View Post
Parents had of these when I was growing up. Actually due to their age they are selling it, as they made the switch to gas.

But the thing heated a five bedroom house trouble free since 1984 without skipping a beat.

samsung galaxy note 2
__________________
I'd rather be riding a Asian girl.
LLpeteJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 03:22 PM   #13
Chad05gsa
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Ithaca ny
Oddometer: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLpeteJ View Post
That is what the industry refers to as a slammer (any insert that just slides in and vents through an open fireplace damper) While it may have heated your house well for the last 20 years or so that basic slammer design has been obsolete and considered unfit for use as a wood heating appliance. The professional opinions is that is shall not be used and it doubtful that you will ever find a reputable company to service it as nobody will touch them for liability reasons.
Well I don't know shit about fireplaces no doubt. Wonder if it would be ok to use in my detached garage for a heat if needed then?

samsung galaxy note 2
Chad05gsa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 05:16 PM   #14
crawdad
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2004
Location: South Jersey
Oddometer: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLpeteJ View Post
It does not meet minimum code requirements on the chimney liner or the liner manufactures installation instructions.
Any idea why you would need an insulated liner in a perfectly good masonry chimney? Not doubting what you say just curious why. I installed mine about 10-12 yrs ago with a ss flex liner and never had any problems, always willing to be schooled though.
crawdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 05:40 PM   #15
Bigmak
Bornagin Realist
 
Bigmak's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Vaderson, Washingon
Oddometer: 16,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad05gsa View Post
Well I don't know shit about fireplaces no doubt. Wonder if it would be ok to use in my detached garage for a heat if needed then?

samsung galaxy note 2
Out here in Oregon, "fireboxes" were steel/Heatilators by the late 60's on, very little actual stonework. I did some marketing aids for an insert company in the early 80's (Eagle Cap), and my BIL bought one in 1984. They were out of biz pretty quick, as the extra heat caught the wood framing above on fire.
As long as you can put a 6" pipe on top, and use the insulated stainless in the attic/roof, you should be good.
__________________
You're not ignorant, you just know so much that isn't true. RR

The Mak is right. There. I said it. I agreed with the Mak. Lobby
Bigmak is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014