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Old 09-13-2013, 08:04 AM   #18376
cug
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Originally Posted by Kawidad View Post
Nah, that's the cruiser market.
Okay, we are a close second ...
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:01 AM   #18377
Mtneer
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These bikes come with the cheapest suspension that Triumph can get away with, keeps the profit margin higher for them. How does a Tiger with a steel frame and almost no suspension adjustment cost more than Street Triple R or Daytona. Plus these bike have minimal body work. I just got mine, but I will upgrade the suspension, it is one area where the bike is lacking the most, AK 20's and shock are pricey but once you have ridden on a well set up bike, you see that money is well spent. Mine has some bounce, never noticed it when I demoed it new, but the bike had 800 miles on it and the rear tire had a bit of a flat spot, so I figure some of it is the tires and wear on them. Also, when you really rail in to a turn, it helps to trail the brakes till you transition back to open the throttle or it seems the front end rebounds too quickly. The seat could use some better foam, but all in all I'm pretty happy with the comfort level and versatility the bike provides, like standard bikes of old.
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Old 09-13-2013, 04:20 PM   #18378
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Originally Posted by Mtneer View Post
These bikes come with the cheapest suspension that Triumph can get away with,
I disagree. Given the price of the bike the suspension is an excellent compromise. I find it comfortable on long runs, capable in some serious off-road and fine on the twisties.

I agree that a suspension upgrade will improve the bike, no question. It's on my todo list.

BUT compared to other standard setups the Tiger is a good compromise. (Just don't look at the KTM )
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Old 09-13-2013, 04:47 PM   #18379
helotaxi
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Originally Posted by btao View Post
Step 3: Proper hand guards (Acerbis or Barkbusters)
For a bike this size Highway Dirtbikes is the only way to go for handguards.
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Old 09-13-2013, 04:50 PM   #18380
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For a bike this size Highway Dirtbikes is the only way to go for handguards.
Barkbuster Storm have done exactly what they were supposed to do whenever I needed them doing something.
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Old 09-13-2013, 04:57 PM   #18381
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Originally Posted by cug View Post
Barkbuster Storm have done exactly what they were supposed to do whenever I needed them doing something.
Good for you. The HDB are still a better design and better made. Significantly stronger and no chance that they will rotate on the bar and leave your levers exposed.
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Old 09-13-2013, 05:02 PM   #18382
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Originally Posted by helotaxi View Post
Good for you. The HDB are still a better design and better made. Significantly stronger and no chance that they will rotate on the bar and leave your levers exposed.
But you need massive risers and a new handle bar clamp for them. Some people prefer not to get that. Also the Barkbuster Storm have better hand coverage from the elements as it looks.

I would not say one or the other is better or worse. They both have their benefits.
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Old 09-14-2013, 06:57 AM   #18383
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Could someone please explain why there needs to been tension on the cam chain tensioner blade during removal of cam chain tensioner?

I'm in the middle of a valve adjustment and this step has me more than a little confused. Is it just to make removal of the CCT easier? It doesn't seem to be there to help keep things timed since it needs to be removed anyway to get the the cams out.

Also, the two 35mm bolts in the right hand crank cover...why do they need to be replaced? I don't understand anything about this. First, they're longer than the others for no obvious reason. Secondly, they turned out a bit harder than the others, also for no obvious reasons. Finally, the manual says to discard them. What the heck is going on with these two bolts?



BTW, some of you guys are nuts. The suspension on the XC is among the finest in the world and anyone that doesn't think so should go put 24,000 miles on a DR650.
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Old 09-14-2013, 07:28 AM   #18384
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Originally Posted by Seventy One View Post
Could someone please explain why there needs to been tension on the cam chain tensioner blade during removal of cam chain tensioner?

I'm in the middle of a valve adjustment and this step has me more than a little confused. Is it just to make removal of the CCT easier? It doesn't seem to be there to help keep things timed since it needs to be removed anyway to get the the cams out.
It keeps the guide in place, as it can drop to the abyss.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seventy One View Post
Also, the two 35mm bolts in the right hand crank cover...why do they need to be replaced? I don't understand anything about this. First, they're longer than the others for no obvious reason. Secondly, they turned out a bit harder than the others, also for no obvious reasons. Finally, the manual says to discard them. What the heck is going on with these two bolts?
SOP. Just reapply some mid-strength threadlock to them and reinstall.

Also, while you're messing around with your torque wrench, be sure to hit all the engine's fasteners. The torque settings are all the same, so long as you're working on same sized bolts. The triple's harmonics seem to have a way of loosening fasteners. My 675 and 1050 have, both, loosened bolts.
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Old 09-14-2013, 07:34 AM   #18385
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Originally Posted by cory1848 View Post
I read that write up, very good. Appreciate you taking the time to do all that. I have never taken suspension apart to that extent before so I am really nervous about screwing something up and having it cost a lot more than it should.
I'm no suspension expert, either. I pay shipping and labor fees to have the security in knowing my stuff is right, out of the box. I run Traxxion products on three bikes and they've nailed everything. Plus, they dyno all work done, to ensure it's correct.


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Originally Posted by cory1848 View Post
I am also thinking that if I am going to do something this major, then I would want the comp and rebound adjustment options. I thought Racetech had a drop in option for that, but I haven't seen it for the XC.
They probably do have cartridges. Just call them. The XC's forks are nothing unusual and the internals should be the same as other applications.
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Old 09-14-2013, 08:05 AM   #18386
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Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
The XC's forks are nothing unusual and the internals should be the same as other applications.
Correct. As far as I got on my rebuild (I didn't mess with shim stacks) I didn't need any special tools like spring compressors or anything. They fell apart very easily.
I got good results by putting in thinner oil and increasing the air gap. Basically I used a 7.5W oil (26 Cst@40C) at 130mm level. The initial bump absorption is much better, without losing control. Much more comfortable overall. Total cost 10 for the oil. I'm buggered if I'm going to pay upwards of 200 for someone elses idea of a good fork action.
And before you all jump in.......I'm not saying that a set of Ohlins isn't better. Just that I got a satisfactory improvement for 10.
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Old 09-14-2013, 08:10 AM   #18387
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Sometimes that's all it takes to make a difference.

People don't realize how quickly suspension oil performance degrades. Since suspension has been deemed a "black art", people tend to shy away from servicing it. On shocks, I get it. But, forks are easy to change oil and air gaps. I'm not sure I've smelled anything worse in a motorcycle than nasty suspension oil. It's like a sewer slurry.
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Old 09-14-2013, 09:09 AM   #18388
swimmer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
It keeps the guide in place, as it can drop to the abyss.



.
I think it is actually so that tension remains on the chain so that if/when the crank is turned there is no chance of the chain skipping a tooth on the cam gears. I don't think its possible to the guide to drop as I thought is was held and pivoting from the bottom.
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Old 09-14-2013, 10:50 AM   #18389
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
It keeps the guide in place, as it can drop to the abyss.



SOP. Just reapply some mid-strength threadlock to them and reinstall.

Also, while you're messing around with your torque wrench, be sure to hit all the engine's fasteners. The torque settings are all the same, so long as you're working on same sized bolts. The triple's harmonics seem to have a way of loosening fasteners. My 675 and 1050 have, both, loosened bolts.
+1 on the torque checking. Re the bolts: I'll need to check but bolts that are "throwaways" are also referred to as "stretch bolts." Easy to understand the term. They stretch under torque and are typically one time use only. When you say they turned out harder than the others, this was because of altered threads that are also one time use.

I don't know if they are included in the valve adjust kit or if you bought it, but for me, after all the effort to get in there, the importance of what they are holding AND the catastrophic event that will take place if they fail, I'd buy two new bolts.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:29 PM   #18390
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In case anyone has one or knows of one, I am looking to buy a used fuel tank (no XC marking). Must be in very good condition. White would be best but other colors may work. Thanks
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