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Old 04-26-2015, 03:32 AM   #1
nick2ny OP
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Got my dream bike (1998 R1), but I'm not learning anything. Sell?

Howdy- would love to hear your opinions about when it's time to sell a bike.

Two or three years ago I got my long-time dream bike--A stock 1998 Yamaha R1...I love to think about it, but when I ride it, it's just too much (at least for the police climate--with no police, it would be sweet).



Until then, I'd owned a VF700F Interceptor, two Honda Hobbits, a CB550, a KLR, a TW200, a Ducati 900SS, and a Honda Cub.

All the other bikes were in average to poor shape, but this R1 is absolutely excellent. When I bought it it had 3700 miles and the original tires... I changed all the fluids, put on a new set of pads, a fresh set of tires, and set off.

It is sooo fast, and the fuelling is awesome. It's just if I ask myself the question--

What's the fastest bike I can afford?

It's a different answer from

What's the most fun bike I can afford?

Or

What bike can I learn the most on?


Seems like the answer to the first question is R1, and the answer to the second and third are KTM supermoto.

The R1 now has 5100 miles on it, but I feel like one of those guys who buys a ferrari and the only thing he gets out of it is "wow! this is fast."

I used to watch this video over and over, but it's from a different era, and those dudes are much better than I am:



It's tough though because it's in basically perfect condition, and I figure it'll be hard to find another one like it. It was my dream bike when it came out, and now I finally have it...

Ooof! Have you guys ever been in this situation before--gotten a bike and it just didn't fit your lifestyle etc.?
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Old 04-26-2015, 03:55 AM   #2
Michaelrm69
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Been there; sell it, buy something new/new to you. It's just a bike and once you find your dream bike you are supposed to start lusting after something another bike, as it gives you the opportunity to buy a new bike!
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Old 04-26-2015, 04:36 AM   #3
Dauntless
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If you take it to the track, you will go fast, have fun, and learn on it. Have you ever participated in a track event?
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Old 04-26-2015, 04:48 AM   #4
Dave.0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dauntless View Post
If you take it to the track, you will go fast, have fun, and learn on it. Have you ever participated in a track event?

^^^^ this -- those bike don't make any sense ridden at 4/10, but they really come alive and the track and that body position actually starts to make sense
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Old 04-26-2015, 04:49 AM   #5
steiny
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Keep it , Do a couple trackdays with it and you will be a better rider .

Beware.... the track is very addicting , I have done 5 so far and love them .
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Old 04-26-2015, 04:57 AM   #6
D.T.
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Keep it as a track bike and buy another fun learning bike!

What do you want to "learn" anyway?
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Old 04-26-2015, 06:32 AM   #7
calamarichris
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If this really is your dream bike, you should learn how to control your throttle hand a little. I've seen guys go to great lengths to accommodate bikes that weren't "suitable". Who cares about suitability if you're in love?
If you really love it (and it really is a bitchin bike), quit looking at the magazines and lusting after the next dreambike.
Trust me, if you fall for the marketing hype and trade it in for the next big thing, soonafter you'll look back at these pictures and think, "What have I done?!?!"
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Old 04-26-2015, 08:26 AM   #8
Rodan
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There's a difference between not liking the bike, and not being able to use it to it's potential....

Back in the late 80's I picked up what was a dream bike for me at the time... a 1987 FZR1000. I wanted one badly, but when I got it, it was buzzy, uncomfortable, and really not that much fun. I got rid of it as quick as I could.

Back then, there wasn't really such a thing as trackdays... you raced, or you rode on the street.

Your R1, is one of 3 or 4 iconic bikes from the late 20th century (CBR900RR, and 916 being a couple of others). As clean as your R1 is, I would keep it, even if I only rode it to Starbucks or Cars & Coffee once in a while. Obviously, it should be treated properly and exercised once in a while as well...

Go take a track school (Code, CLASS, etc.), preferably with a rental bike, and work on your skills. Then take the R1 out and exercise it properly once in a while. You can have a lot of fun on it without pushing it too hard, or turning it in to a track rat.

A bike like that is a real gem. Keep it nice, keep it stock, but ride it!
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Old 04-26-2015, 08:45 PM   #9
ctfz1
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I had one

Loved it. But. It made great riding once past 80-85.
I put 5,000 miles on it, enjoyed having, having had it. Had to mod my next bike to be closer to the parts I liked, really liked on that bike.
You can raise the bars, lower the pegs and have a sport tourer. With the option to change it back.
Or just move on.
There are bikes that tell you what to do.
There are bikes that encourage doing what you like.
I get frustrated sometimes because I like riding different rides, styles, whatever you wish to call variations in mood, use. Bikes that can not multitask, just do not stay.

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Old 04-26-2015, 09:44 PM   #10
Vertical C
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Sometimes the thrill is in the chase and when you get a beautiful thing and have your way... you lose interest.

Plenty of other things to chase.
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Old 04-27-2015, 05:22 AM   #11
Moronic
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I think people who are suggesting track days have missed the point.

If you took that R1 to the track you would face precisely the same dilemma.

You would be riding around trying to make sure you don't crash it. Which if you are not an experienced track rider would mean squirting it a bit down the straights and tip-toeing around the corners.

You would then notice that the people going past you on modified SV650s or whatever other low-cost and eminently crashable track weapon you name seem to be having more fun.

As for whether to keep it ... are you planning to set up a museum? If so, park the R1 there and save up for the second exhibit. No-brainer.
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Old 04-27-2015, 05:41 AM   #12
nick2ny OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moronic View Post
I think people who are suggesting track days have missed the point.

If you took that R1 to the track you would face precisely the same dilemma.

You would be riding around trying to make sure you don't crash it. Which if you are not an experienced track rider would mean squirting it a bit down the straights and tip-toeing around the corners.

You would then notice that the people going past you on modified SV650s or whatever other low-cost and eminently crashable track weapon you name seem to be having more fun.

As for whether to keep it ... are you planning to set up a museum? If so, park the R1 there and save up for the second exhibit. No-brainer.
Agreed. I've ridden on the track before, and it was fun, but I think I'd prefer supermoto racing or kitesurfing rather than the odd track day on a machine like this.

I guess, I dunno, I'm just over it. I wanted it for so long but it was the fun of that video I was after, which I've already had 1000x over on all kinds of motorbikes.
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Old 04-27-2015, 05:42 AM   #13
Paebr332
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vertical C View Post
Sometimes the thrill is in the chase and when you get a beautiful thing and have your way... you lose interest.

Plenty of other things to chase.
Or it could be a classic case of "never meet your hero." Quite often our perception is perfection, while the reality is all too real.
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Old 04-27-2015, 02:55 PM   #14
ausfahrt
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1400 miles in three years?

There's your answer, no sense keeping a bike that you don't ride.
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Old 04-27-2015, 07:35 PM   #15
sparkingdogg
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Most of the fun is in the chase...

... with bikes and with chicas too

Once you have caught them, the excitement of the chase is over.

Some of my "dream bikes" were not really all that fun after I got them. I know what you mean.

It's time to move on when the excitement is gone.
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