ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 53 votes, 4.91 average. Display Modes
Old 01-22-2013, 06:31 PM   #781
Claytonroy
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Oregon
Oddometer: 287
Wheels and Zoning

The reason a lot of tiny homes are built with wheels on a "trailer" platform is first and foremost....TO AVOID EXCESSIVE DEVELOPMENT COSTS. If you're building a structure that's fixed to a foundation, etc. you incur most or all of the same costs as you would to build a 3,500 square foot house. Tacking wheels onto the structure is a simple way to avoid these costs (in most areas that runs $10-20K just in fees). Not to mention it gives you flexibility for the occasional move, but they're not intended to be "RV's".



I'm a big fan of Ross Chapin's work. I particularly like how he uses the sleeping loft feature in his small home plans. Locating the sleeping area above the footprint of the main living space is very efficient. Why pay heating costs/taxes/etc on a vaulted ceiling "master bedroom" when you only use it 8 hours a day? A cozy loft with a skylight....above the main living space, and the sunrise as your morning alarm clock is the way to go.

And for those commenting about resale value, consider the tiny home "development" in Portland on SE 43rd and Division (Google it). The units sold very quickly at @ $120K apiece. With current interest rates, if you have a small down payment that's cheaper than renting an apartment here.

Claytonroy screwed with this post 01-22-2013 at 06:37 PM
Claytonroy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 08:13 PM   #782
xshanex
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Oddometer: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manuel Garcia O'Kely View Post

And yes, the savings on utilities, construction materials and ease of maintaining a smaller home all pay off. My neighbor has a big house and spends upwards of $2,000. month on heat in the winter. I spend less than $1,000 on the entire season of heat and I buy wood and pellets retail. There are two people living in each house.
$2,000! Even $1,000 for a winter seems like a lot of $

Climate, design, and efficiency is a major factor too. I live in the PNW and it costs me a max of $180 per month to heat almost 4,000 sq ft during the winter while I have a buddy who is above $250 to heat a place a little over a third the size of mine. Would maybe have more motivation for a small place if I was in a different situation
xshanex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 09:10 PM   #783
cab591
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Oddometer: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by overlandr View Post
Works well in Europe where pop density/history are major factors. Would it work in the US? Apols if 205.

[video of garage converted to house]

Love the Storage/bedroom cube.
Probably one of my favorite small houses. I love just about everything about that design. You could even pull a couple motorcycles onto the patio, and have them secured at night! Wouldn't mind having a place like that in a big city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
The open floor plan version is imo nice. I'd have no qualms putting the bedroom up front, as it seems irrational to me to be worried about visitors in the middle of the night (I suppose I live in a nice enough neighborhood). I'm not exactly envisioning people dropping this house right next to a sidewalk in the city. It would be simple enough, imo, to just swap the sizes of the larger bedroom and smaller, and have the master in the rear.

The lofts are not functional as a master, per se. Sloping roof line would relegate standing height to an area about 5' wide in the center of the loft. It's storage--something any small space will need.
Bedroom up front doesn't bother me, either. Reading the blog of someone who built that very same model (in fact, their's is the one in the pictures), they widened the rear bedroom to the width of the house. It made it a more spacious master bedroom, and allowed for a larger closet.

The lofts depend on perception. With skylights or dormers, they could definitely work as sleeping lofts. Personally, I'm fairly short (about 5'8"). I'm usually in my room just to sleep, and actually like sleeping in high places. Throw a mattress on the ground in the loft, and I'd be happy.
cab591 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 05:16 AM   #784
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by madeouttaglass View Post
Dormers are your friend in those spots


]
I always liked your cabin. I live in a cape...yes...dormers are verrrrry useful!
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 10:57 AM   #785
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,179
Tiny house...meet tiny apartment. These guys are going to be built a few blocks from my old architecture office. About fifty 370 sqft "micro apartments" in the project. The ideas are similar, but you're catering to 50 people instead of 2. So, the project is as much about the thought that goes into the communal spaces (rooftop decks, parking, common rooms, lounges, etc) as it is about what's in the demised space. Neat: it's all pre-fab modular construction.

DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 12:40 PM   #786
JamesG
Rabid Poster
 
JamesG's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Columbus, GA
Oddometer: 10,946
Had a mental picture of the apartment from The Fifth Element in reading the description and imagining what they will really be like...

__________________
I am a conservative, not a Republican. There is a difference.
JamesG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 01:11 PM   #787
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesG View Post
Had a mental picture of the apartment from The Fifth Element in reading the description and imagining what they will really be like...


yeah, it can be ugly. But I've seen spaces like these irl, and it can work decently. Back in 2003, a good friend of mine had just moved to Prague for a new job. It's apparently not uncommon to find spaces alot like these. Hers had a *smaller* kitchenette area. It's certainly sparse though. I had the ambition at the time to bake her a pie, and had to use the hotel's oven. And I don't think it's particularly workable w/o the 10' high ceiling. You kind of need that, and alot of existing structures just don't have the bones to give you that.
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 07:27 PM   #788
overlandr
Temporal Shifter
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Sydney
Oddometer: 5,790
Panic Attack!!

overlandr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 08:24 PM   #789
cab591
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Oddometer: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
Tiny house...meet tiny apartment...
I love small apartments -- definitely needed in places like NYC and San Fran. Though with the higher cost of living, these don't really prevent people from taking on large debt if they plan on buying! (though renting / utilities would be much cheaper than a full sized unit). My Uncle's got a place in Brooklyn Heights. Studio apartment, about 500 sq ft. Cost upwards of $650,000! Granted, location is key. Something the same size, out Long Island a little farther (or, in a worse part of Brooklyn) would be considerably less.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cab591 View Post
... For example, I lived in a small apartment with a few friends over the summer. And by that, I mean sharing about 300 sq ft with 3 other people ... The main room, about 10'x15', was our kitchen, dining room, living room, office, and bedroom for 3 of us! That was one hell of a summer. :
Found a few pictures of the apartment. Good times. This picture really sums up the place pretty well. This was taken at the front door, looking in. This is the main room, about 10' wide and 15' deep. That kitchen has everything! Fridge/freezer, dishwasher, range/oven, sink, and a microwave -- all in an 8'x2.5' space.



Just past the sink, to the left of the french doors, was a door to the 10' x 10' bedroom (which also had a single set of french doors onto the balcony). From the bedroom, there was a 5' x 5' closet (which also housed the stacked washer and dryer), and a 5' x 5' bathroom. The bathroom was kind of cool. The whole thing was tiled, with a drain in the middle of the room. There was a toilet, a sink, and a shower head just sticking out of the wall, turning the whole room into the shower.

Surprisingly easy to fit 4 people in that apartment.
cab591 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 08:51 PM   #790
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab591 View Post
I love small apartments -- definitely needed in places like NYC and San Fran. Though with the higher cost of living, these don't really prevent people from taking on large debt if they plan on buying! (though renting / utilities would be much cheaper than a full sized unit). My Uncle's got a place in Brooklyn Heights. Studio apartment, about 500 sq ft. Cost upwards of $650,000! Granted, location is key. Something the same size, out Long Island a little farther (or, in a worse part of Brooklyn) would be considerably less.

Found a few pictures of the apartment. Good times. This picture really sums up the place pretty well. This was taken at the front door, looking in. This is the main room, about 10' wide and 15' deep. That kitchen has everything! Fridge/freezer, dishwasher, range/oven, sink, and a microwave -- all in an 8'x2.5' space.

Just past the sink, to the left of the french doors, was a door to the 10' x 10' bedroom (which also had a single set of french doors onto the balcony). From the bedroom, there was a 5' x 5' closet (which also housed the stacked washer and dryer), and a 5' x 5' bathroom. The bathroom was kind of cool. The whole thing was tiled, with a drain in the middle of the room. There was a toilet, a sink, and a shower head just sticking out of the wall, turning the whole room into the shower.

Surprisingly easy to fit 4 people in that apartment.
Without knowing jack about you & your roomates, I can nearly guarantee you that the pain point in that space (if you had to name one) was the fridge.
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 09:40 PM   #791
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by overlandr View Post

Love the Storage/bedroom cube.
Ya, that was a really well done hunk of work!
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 01:28 AM   #792
overlandr
Temporal Shifter
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Sydney
Oddometer: 5,790
Spare a thought for the poor in Hong Kong

While we may ponder over how cool a tiny home may be or layouts, materials, orientation, locations etc, spare a thought for those whom have no choice and must live in what may possibly be the smallest homes of all due to poverty in Hong Kong



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...t-hutches.html
overlandr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 03:03 AM   #793
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by overlandr View Post
While we may ponder over how cool a tiny home may be or layouts, materials, orientation, locations etc, spare a thought for those whom have no choice and must live in what may possibly be the smallest homes of all due to poverty in Hong Kong



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...t-hutches.html
That little girl they interviewed is a sweetheart.

I know a girl, actually, who lived in one of those "cubicle apartments." She was quite independent-minded...went to Yale. Had an i-banking gig w/ Morgan Stanley in Hong Kong (maybe it was bear stearns...can't recall). Could definitely afford to live elsewhere, but wanted to help her mom out as much as she could, since her dad basically ditched them in favor of his mistress. It was an odd live, because she brushed real close with both the richest and poorest of the HK world. HK makes "class warfare" in the States look like a joke. She eventually married one of my best friends. Lives in a pretty decent flat in London now...also ridiculously small.

There are often design competitions aiming to help resolve high density, impoverished living conditions like those. But it is definitely a tough to find real answers to.
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 05:26 AM   #794
garandman
Beastly Adventurer
 
garandman's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Boston, MA
Oddometer: 5,735
I had a smallish condo years ago in Marblehead, MA - big sailing center. The kitchen space was really narrow and there was no way we could put in full-sized appliances and keep a dining area.

Then I had the idea of making it more like a galley. I found a small stove, an office-sized fridge, and GE makes a special sink and dishwasher that will go under it. There was only enough room for the dishwasher door to come down right in front of the cabinets. This problem was solved by going to a marine supply store and getting the recessed drawer pulls used on sailboats.

The ceilings were plenty high so we had lots of cabinet space above and I could store all the food I needed and kitchen appliances etc in the cabinets. It did take me a while to find a cabinet designer willing to work with such a small space, but I laid it out in CAD so we had all the measurements down to the inch.
__________________
2012 WR250R, 2009 TW200, 2008 Tiger 1050 ABS, 2008 CRF100F

“The problem in defense is how far you can go without destroying from within what you are trying to defend from without.” ― Dwight D. Eisenhower
garandman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 05:27 AM   #795
cab591
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Oddometer: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
Without knowing jack about you & your roomates, I can nearly guarantee you that the pain point in that space (if you had to name one) was the fridge.


Can't exactly deny it... Though the location was pretty sweet. The building had 4 bars on the ground floor, and some larger apartments upstairs. That apartment, and another (identical) apartment were on the ground floor, behind the bars. On weekends, I had to walk through a crowd of a couple hundred drunk college students just to get to my front door. It was sort of in the "party district".

Oddly enough, we'd have a big group of friends over (about 8-12 people, usually) every weekend. That little kitchen was able to cook enough food for everyone, and (though it was tight), we even had enough seating! Cooking for large groups got interesting, though. The stove had 4 burners, but it was a juggling act just to cook everything.
cab591 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014