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Old 07-30-2010, 07:43 PM   #1
GSIslander OP
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Keep getting flats!

We bought a pair of electric scooters about a month ago. Yeah I know not really up to battle standards......but these go 70kph and get us around town and back and forth to work.

We have had 2!!! flats on the rear tire of one of the bikes, both flats due to road debris. I replaced the first stock tire (Kenda 3.5x10 tubeless) with a Michelin S83 3.5x10 tubeless.

Is there some better tire that is MORE flat resistant? I remember hearing about something that could be put into a tire to keep it from going flat. Anyone know what the name of that stuff is? Is it safe to use in a scooter?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:50 PM   #2
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Here is a pic of one of them. The other is yellow and likes nails in its rear.........tire that is!

From Motorino 11
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Old 07-30-2010, 11:50 PM   #3
fullmetalscooter
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just this stuff. cost 15 bucks a tire. rhino tire liner. you might even have dealer in your area

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emTvm5tu0ac
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Old 07-31-2010, 01:11 AM   #4
ColinDoyle
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Are you riding on the shoulder a lot?

I got two or three punctures in 2500 miles on my Ruckus before I grew a pair and learned to own my lane. I used to move over whenever I saw faster traffic approaching, then wave them around. When you ride like that on well-travelled 55 MPH county roads, you spend a lot of time in the "debris lane."
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Old 07-31-2010, 02:34 AM   #5
Lammy1000
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Some "slime" in the tire will help. This is avaiable at many stores.
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Old 07-31-2010, 04:40 AM   #6
ronnath
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does any of that stuff (slime or the rhino product) "puddle" up when the bike is stored for awhile - like during winter?
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:26 AM   #7
Cogswell
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Vendors forum, sticky at top of the page looks like a good flat preventive product.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=596213


YMMV.


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Old 07-31-2010, 12:15 PM   #8
emmettken
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cogswell
Vendors forum, sticky at top of the page looks like a good flat preventive product.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=596213


YMMV.


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Thanks Mike! Think I'll order some for my Burgman 400. Just placed my order for TyreGuard, should have enough left to do my bicycle. Ken

emmettken screwed with this post 07-31-2010 at 12:50 PM
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Old 07-31-2010, 04:56 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronnath
does any of that stuff (slime or the rhino product) "puddle" up when the bike is stored for awhile - like during winter?
Probably. The tire shop guys hate it, too. Be prepared to pay twice as much for your dismount/mount.
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:40 AM   #10
vortexau
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Anyone who's route takes them over risky roads (nails, screws, & other sharp hazards) should consider the option of fitting a long, surface-contact, front mudflap.

When the front tyre runs over this kind of object, it'll stick flat against the tread surface long enough that it will still be upright when the rear tyre arrives at the same location. Then, there is the chance that the rear tyre will drive it in against the resistance of the road surface. That's why its usually the rear that suffers from a penetration.

When the front has a long mudflap that sweeps the road it becomes more likely that the object will be trapped untill it works its way to the left or right rim of the flap before it flies free. This lowers your chance that the rear will run over it.

But if it does work its way out and then lie infront of the rear; the action of the flap increases the chance that the object will be flat rather than standing. If its flat there is less chance of penetration for the rear tyre.

If your front mudguard (fender) is too abbreviated to mount a flap to; the next option is to tack it on under the front radiator cowling. Take notice that to work like this the mudflap has to be able to wipe the road surface.



Like this but slightly wider and long enough to touch the road.
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:12 AM   #11
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Yeah, I definitely agree. Never have had a front tire catch a nail. Now if the original question wasn't about how to prevent flats, I'd say learn how to plug your holes. Takes longer to put air back in the tire than it does to plug the hole. Your lucky you've got tubeless tires. I always have a compact bicycle pump in my backpack and carry the patch kit on the bike.


Quote:
Originally Posted by vortexau
Anyone who's route takes them over risky roads (nails, screws, & other sharp hazards) should consider the option of fitting a long, surface-contact, front mudflap.

When the front tyre runs over this kind of object, it'll stick flat against the tread surface long enough that it will still be upright when the rear tyre arrives at the same location. Then, there is the chance that the rear tyre will drive it in against the resistance of the road surface. That's why its usually the rear that suffers from a penetration.

When the front has a long mudflap that sweeps the road it becomes more likely that the object will be trapped untill it works its way to the left or right rim of the flap before it flies free. This lowers your chance that the rear will run over it.

But if it does work its way out and then lie infront of the rear; the action of the flap increases the chance that the object will be flat rather than standing. If its flat there is less chance of penetration for the rear tyre.

If your front mudguard (fender) is too abbreviated to mount a flap to; the next option is to tack it on under the front radiator cowling. Take notice that to work like this the mudflap has to be able to wipe the road surface.



Like this but slightly wider and long enough to touch the road.
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:28 AM   #12
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Do those magnet things that trigger the signal lights help at all?

I know that wouldn't help with the front tire picking up a nail, but it might save the back tire.
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Old 08-02-2010, 12:09 PM   #13
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I really like this idea! This would work out great for our electrics as they are most always in the "Danger Zone"
Quote:


Like this but slightly wider and long enough to touch the road.
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Old 08-02-2010, 12:11 PM   #14
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Actually I have plugged tires before, including on the same scooter! I'm going to install an accessory plug so I can run a small electric tire pump, so I can fully fix the flat on the side of the road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fatboy
Yeah, I definitely agree. Never have had a front tire catch a nail. Now if the original question wasn't about how to prevent flats, I'd say learn how to plug your holes. Takes longer to put air back in the tire than it does to plug the hole. Your lucky you've got tubeless tires. I always have a compact bicycle pump in my backpack and carry the patch kit on the bike.
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:39 PM   #15
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I gotta believe that there is such low volume to your tires that it would be nothing to pump one up by hand. My bicycle pump is just an inch or so wide by maybe 8 long. I don't get flats that often to worry about it much. I just want to be able to fix it on side of the road and the pump suffices. My fix-it-flat kit costs like $5. Just a rasp, needle, rubber thread and latex gloves ... so I dont get my hands dirty. If its just a regular flat ... I'll run the tire till it wears out. Otherwise, its fixed good enough till next service visit.
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