ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-06-2010, 12:00 AM   #16
redpillar
Studly Adventurer
 
redpillar's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 861
Thanks for sharing, Can you tell me what the range is for your DRZ not including the fuel can you have on the back?
redpillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 12:22 AM   #17
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
After enjoying the food, we found Patrol Dog's tire to be flat. He undertook the task of removing the wheel and patching the tube. The Inn provided him with a shaded spot to work on his project.




Looks like he just found the problem!



Patrol Dog was also enjoying meeting some of the local residents.



He was trying to find out some of his new friend's gardening secrets.




Patrol Dog's new friend is also an artist when it comes to building a downspout.



A coast to coast rider (west to east).



Patrol Dog guided me on the next part of the trail since he had ridden this section a few weeks previous. It was nice to be with someone who was familiar with sections so we didn't have to concentrate as much on navigation.



We welcomed the cloud cover.


This section is the single track section that is referenced on the maps and charts. The entrance to this road was not very obvious. It was nice to have the GPS and its map to reinforce to us that the roll chart was correct.





We soon were riding through familiar terrain. GNATSASS '08 had been in this region. We were soon riding in rain. Things got a little slippery, but not bad. The camera stayed dry, so therefore no photos on the descent of Sawmill canyon.

By the time we hit Lund, NV. for fuel, the rain had stopped.
Unfortunately, the grill at Whipple's Country Store had stopped as well. I think they recognized Patrol Dog from his visit the previous year though, and the grills were fired back up so we could eat.

Our gracious cook


The boss that evening


Don't pass a chance to visit Whipple's.



We were now off on scheduled motel stops according to the roll charts. No problem though, since Preston, NV. was just up the road. Patrol Dog dresses for rain, just in case.


We had the town of Preston to ourselves that night.

quota screwed with this post 08-06-2010 at 08:00 AM
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 12:26 AM   #18
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by redpillar
Thanks for sharing, Can you tell me what the range is for your DRZ not including the fuel can you have on the back?
About 160 miles (260 km). I have another DRZ E with the same fuel capacity and its range is 200 miles (320 km). I've not messed around with the jetting on either one. Just rode them as they were when I bought them. It will be interesting to look at the differences (too busy riding to look now!).
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 07:42 AM   #19
Patrol Dog
Just Livin the Dream!
 
Patrol Dog's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Oddometer: 17
Things were going good

Quota is telling the story well. I will just throw in my two cents worth.

The trail from Kanosh to the Nevada border is pretty much high speed gravel. It is flat for Utah. You might not think so if you were from Nebraska. There are several counties in this area that have few paved roads. They just gravel most of them and run a grader over them year round.

Since we were racing to get to breakfast in time I was cutting corners on the two track just over the Nevada border. I ran a piece of pucker bush straight through the tire and tube. I've changed a lot of tires by hand and getting this one aired back up and getting the bead to seal was a challenge. I have since thrown my had pump away and don't bother with the air cartridges. I bought a Cycle Pump (12 volt) and I am much happier.

After I found out the guy with the beard wasn't growing marijuanna and was just pulling weeds I was more interested in how long it would take me to grow a beard like that. Turns out I am not going to live long enough, especially if I have to wait until retirement to get started.

The Nevada portion is really fun to ride. The terrain changes up often and stays interesting. The single track Quota referred is the Dual Sport Bypass in the Nevada Section. There is another disclaimer similiar to the Utah one. I had tried to find my way through this area earlier in June while out on a short solo trip. We wouldn't have found it this time if Quota didn't have GPS. His GPS showed a road that appeared to have long been grown in and was a single track hard to find in a several places. This is the place I went down on the trip. We were going up a loose gravel wash with boulders poking up frequently. While avoiding the rocks and trying to keep my speed up the front end started shaking like a fish out of water. Down on the left side but no serious damage.

It seems every state has at least two or three Sawmill Canyons. It was raining when we went down this one but when you go you will not soon forget this one.

Ok... when we land in Preston, we are still ahead of schedule. We were enjoying every mininte of ride. Those who have done the ride know what I am talking about and the rest of you will know when you get there.

It has been 24 hours now with no Cheetos and I am holding up just fine.
__________________
We do not stop playing and riding because we are old....we grow old because we stop playing and riding!
Patrol Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 07:44 AM   #20
redpillar
Studly Adventurer
 
redpillar's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by quota
About 160 miles (260 km). I have another DRZ E with the same fuel capacity and its range is 200 miles (320 km). I've not messed around with the jetting on either one. Just rode them as they were when I bought them. It will be interesting to look at the differences (too busy riding to look now!).
Thanks so much, Did you need the extra fuel tank? I am starting the TAT in a few weeks and have about 180 mile range on my KLX. Just wondering if I need to pack extra gas.
redpillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 10:18 PM   #21
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
Redpillar,
I think you should be fine. If you don't get turned around or lost...
That being said, I always felt a little better knowing a had some spare petrol. Even a liter.

I think it was just twice that I had to add gas. In both cases, I was just 2-3 miles from fuel. If I'd not have had to turn around/detour, I'd have been fine.

More on my fuel range later in the report...
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 11:24 PM   #22
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
A nice lady named Gleanna was the manager at the motel in Preston. We had a good time visiting with Gleanna and her son who was visiting.
The next morning, when we went to the convenience store behind the motel for some breakfast, we met Gleanna working her second job at the store.



Riding out of the Preston/Lund area, Patrol Dog pointed out a guy with a sense of humor.
The next photo shows a Ronald McDonald statue standing over the reservoir. The photo that follows has a tractor sitting on some concrete supports. When the reservoir fills, I guess it will appear that Ronald is walking on water and the tractor is floating. We were quite a ways off. Both photos are cropped significantly and the subjects are not easy to see. They are in the lower part, middle of the photo.





Near the summit of Patterson Pass


These two wild horses were kind enough to pose and not just run away.


We didn't hear any opera in Eureka, NV. but did stop for lunch there.


Leaving Eureka, we ran into the routing problems that so many others have had. The mine has expanded operations and new fences and gates were up. After spending an hour looking for a way around, we just bailed out to the tarmac for a few miles.
Again, Patrol Dog had ridden much of this just a few weeks previous, so it was familiar riding to him.

Cheetos, Diet Coke, and skeletons...
Patrol Dog likes them all.


The mining business is still active in Nevada.




In 2001, the Washington Post nominated Battle Mountain, NV. as the "armpit of America". We saw no reason to dispute the nomination, but after a warm dusty day on the trail, we would make do.



Hey Patrol Dog! Check out your tire. It is flat again...



The Owl Club in Battle Mountain


The Owl Club could rent us a motel room and serve food, so it would be our home for the night. It was a shame that the air conditioning in the casino/restaurant area wasn't working. The portable units that had been brought in worked well if you didn't move more than 3 feet away. We just sat in front of one for a couple of hours, ate popcorn and hydrated.

Finally it was time for dinner. Charlotte took great care of us.


Remember that flat tire? Now that we were done with dinner and since it wasn't quite midnight, it was time to replace a tube.


The patch that had been installed the day before in Baker was not doing its job. All is well now with a new tube.
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 09:30 PM   #23
Patrol Dog
Just Livin the Dream!
 
Patrol Dog's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Oddometer: 17
Wink Did you see that pile of bones?

Those bones were pretty much smack in the middle of Nevada. That watering hole might have been poisoned. We saw lots of cattle skeletons around that hole. The bones featured in the picture looked a little different. Not being a anthropologist I just surmised they were what was left of a TAT rider who ran out of gas or water. Take plenty of gas and water.

There are hundreds of opportunities to take good photos. Quota is pretty quick to pull the trigger on a camera and get it put away and get back on the throttle. There are still lots of photos we could have taken. Like others have said, there is nothing like seeing it in person.

There was a lot of moon dust coming into Battle Mountain. When you ride it with your friends try to be in the lead like my friend Quota was on our trip. If there has been a lot of rain when your get to the moon dust areas then you will be in my prayers.

Up to this point we have traveled the 583 miles of TAT in Utah and 342 miles in Nevada that lands us in Battle Mountain. We made it 925 miles total in just under four days. We pulled into town at 3:00 PM. We made good time because there were only two of us to this point, because we live in Utah and were familiar with some of the areas, and because I rode some of the Nevada portion a month earlier. When I rode it earlier June was wet for Nevada. I went down in the mud and had to unload my DR just to pick it up. The mud had rolled up on my wheels and locked up the rear. I dug some mud out, turned around, and went home. I was almost out of time anyway.

All are parts of the adventure. It is not knowing how long it will take, how long you will be lost off course, how long it will take to find yourself, how many times you will go down if at all, and what kind of weather you will have. It is all fun.
__________________
We do not stop playing and riding because we are old....we grow old because we stop playing and riding!
Patrol Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 08:36 AM   #24
Nevada1/2rack
Rock Magnet
 
Nevada1/2rack's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Great Basin Desert (Sutro area)
Oddometer: 9
Thumb Super photos!!

And a whole lot more moon dust on the exit side Of Battle Mountain too, hey, Patrol Dog? But Quota and you will cover that well enough in the sequel... And Quota-incredible photos!!! Can't wait to see the upcoming remainder of this ride!!
Nevada1/2rack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 11:28 AM   #25
Bert Fox
Casual Adventurer
 
Bert Fox's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: Elko, NV USA
Oddometer: 455
In defense of Battle Mountain

Quote:
Originally Posted by quota
A nice lady named Gleanna was the manager at the motel in Preston. We had a good time visiting with Gleanna and her son who was visiting.
The next morning, when we went to the convenience store behind the motel for some breakfast, we met Gleanna working her second job at the store.



Riding out of the Preston/Lund area, Patrol Dog pointed out a guy with a sense of humor.
The next photo shows a Ronald McDonald statue standing over the reservoir. The photo that follows has a tractor sitting on some concrete supports. When the reservoir fills, I guess it will appear that Ronald is walking on water and the tractor is floating. We were quite a ways off. Both photos are cropped significantly and the subjects are not easy to see. They are in the lower part, middle of the photo.





Near the summit of Patterson Pass


These two wild horses were kind enough to pose and not just run away.


We didn't hear any opera in Eureka, NV. but did stop for lunch there.


Leaving Eureka, we ran into the routing problems that so many others have had. The mine has expanded operations and new fences and gates were up. After spending an hour looking for a way around, we just bailed out to the tarmac for a few miles.
Again, Patrol Dog had ridden much of this just a few weeks previous, so it was familiar riding to him.

Cheetos, Diet Coke, and skeletons...
Patrol Dog likes them all.


The mining business is still active in Nevada.




In 2001, the Washington Post nominated Battle Mountain, NV. as the "armpit of America". We saw no reason to dispute the nomination, but after a warm dusty day on the trail, we would make do.



Hey Patrol Dog! Check out your tire. It is flat again...



The Owl Club in Battle Mountain


The Owl Club could rent us a motel room and serve food, so it would be our home for the night. It was a shame that the air conditioning in the casino/restaurant area wasn't working. The portable units that had been brought in worked well if you didn't move more than 3 feet away. We just sat in front of one for a couple of hours, ate popcorn and hydrated.

Finally it was time for dinner. Charlotte took great care of us.


Remember that flat tire? Now that we were done with dinner and since it wasn't quite midnight, it was time to replace a tube.


The patch that had been installed the day before in Baker was not doing its job. All is well now with a new tube.
Say what you will about the "Armpit of America" in the NY Times, but how many places can boast an unemployment rate of 5% and an average hourly worker can make $100,000 a year if he is willing to put in overtime? If it isn't grown, it has to be mined!
Long Live GNATSASS!
__________________
Wells, NV
"Riding with one leg is waaay better than not riding!"
GNATSASS Great Basin Dualsport/Adventure Bike Tours
www.gnatsass.net
Find us on Facebook. GNATSASS
Bert Fox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 09:26 PM   #26
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
Patrol Dog has his new tube and it is time for us to hit the highway. And not just figuratively.

The plan was to get on Interstate 80 and ride east for a few hundred miles. I had to get home for work.

Patrol Dog was nice enough to accompany me. I'm sure he is like many on here that spend 3+ weeks riding the TAT in its entirety and would have had no problem getting away for that long, but I was fortunate to have him along for company on the ride home.

Patrol Dog's DR650 Suzuki can cruise all day at interstate highway speeds (75 mph for the stretch we were on), but my DRZ400 Suzuki gets pretty wound up at those speeds (stock gearing for the E model). Knowing that many of the big trucks are governed at slower speeds, we figured we would just tuck behind one and run at 65 mph. Fortunately, we were able to find enough trucks governed at 60-62 mph, that the interstate travel wasn't bad at all. We figured we could just stop every 1-1.5 hours and take a little break.

Before long, we found ourselves in West Wendover, NV. for fuel, food, and drink before traveling across the Bonneville Salt Flats of Utah.

I had points that I could get for a local riding contest here


Lots of history in Wendover, but we didn't stay long.

Just a few miles into Utah and my bike started running a little funny. Every few miles it would die for just a second. Then it would fire back to life and be fine for a few more miles.

Just as we hit mile marker 42, the bike died. Something didn't sound right when it did quit. Bad enough that I could tell it wasn't really worth even looking at.

Temperatures were close to triple digits and there isn't much in the way of shade around here. Patrol Dog hooked up his tow line and took my back west for 1 mile where there was shade at the Knolls exit underpass.

My wife was at home viewing our ride compliments of the SPOT messenger. She found it odd that after 300 miles of progress, we had turned around...

I called AAA and told them to come get me with a tow truck. Patrol Dog was more familiar than most people, of how AAA operates. Lets just say that I was 106 miles from home and I would have been home much sooner if I'd just have called for a ride from home.



Patrol hung out and waited for a couple of hours with me. He then had to get on the road if he was to be home by dark. So, I just sat and waited. 3-4 hours after calling for my tow, it was there.

I wasn't terribly pleased with the long wait (AAA had originally told me that the truck would be to me in 45 minutes), but was polite to the driver anyway.

The tow service was Rick's Mr. Tow out of Wendover. The driver was Rick himself. I knew that with my AAA coverage, I was covered for 100 miles of towing. I recommended a route that would take a few miles off of what was to be my 106 mile tow.

Patrol Dog must have stopped for Cheetos and a Diet Coke, because the tow truck caught up to him in an hour.



Rick didn't take my routing advice and he wouldn't give me an answer on how much the additional 6 miles of towing might cost me. He turned out to be a great guy. The real highlights of this trip had been some of the people that we'd met. Rick was another one of those guys.




Rick and I unloading the cargo.


Patrol Dog makes it home fine and I'm home, just with a broken bike. Time to take some time and figure the bike out and also when we can get back to Battle Mountain and finish our ride to the coast.

And the last 6 miles of towing??? Rick said they were on the house. Great guy. I hope you never need a tow along I-80 in western Utah or eastern Nevada, but if you do, he is the guy to call.

quota screwed with this post 08-09-2010 at 09:32 PM
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 09:56 PM   #27
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
Here is how the DRZ was packed.



I was using the original Giant Loop bag. It performed flawlessly. The red dry bag was where I'd put a layer of clothing when it good too warm. Since the bike came off of the truck, I had by jacket, pants, etc. in there. Normally it wasn't full.

I wore a small pack that had a 3 liter water bladder in it. I'd also store my maps in there as well. The camera was kept handy in a LowePro chest pack.

This was everything that was in the backpack and the GiantLoop


Packing list from the trip.
Backpack
Frogg Toggs jacket
Monkey Butt powder
Roll charts
Maps
Spare gloves
Powder Gatorade
Voile (Wally) straps
Air pressure gauge
Baby wipes
Rok Strap
TP

Clif Bars, tuna fish, Powerbars
Benchmark atlas
Empty 55 gal. trash bag
spark plug
clutch cable
throttle cable
sunglass case
cell phone
camera battery charger
sunscreen
1 oz. bottle Dri Wash 'n Guard w. microfiber towel
Aerostich triple digit raingloves
100 oz. hydration bladder (fits in backpack)
toiletry kit
water filter
20 oz. motor oil in MSR fuel bottle
Cruz tool kit (Econokit M1)
First aid kit
AA batteries
latex gloves
chain lube
head lamp
1 gallon gas jug
Lowe camera bag (chest pack)
fleece jacket
long underwear
thread locker
Cruz tools Outback'r M14
safety wire
Roadgear coconut socks
Dave Wach's oil bottle tool carrier
chain masterlink
duct tape
Leatherman
zip ties
CO2 cartrides
CO2 inflator
hand pump
tow rope
Nikon D40 with 18-55 lens
dry bag
wide brim hat
microfiber bath towel
Hennessy Hammock (Explorer model)
tent ground cloth
sleeping bag
SPOT satellite messenger
sheepskin ( to make tarmac sections more comfortable)
Garmin Emap GPS
Rear tube
Front tube (packed with tire irons in front fender pack)
Giant Loop luggage system
Flip flops
Matches

My list of items to take was adapted from inmate Wachs' packing list as a guide. The oil bottle tool carrier worked out especially well.



I started the trip with new Dunlop 606 tires. So far with about 900 miles of dirt and 600 of pavement, both front and rear are looking great with plenty of miles to go.

The spare shoe that is strapped on top of the load was one that we found in the single track section of Nevada. Seeing fresh tire tracks in front of us, we thought that a TAT rider had lost his shoe the day before. I carried it in hoped we might catch them and return the shoe. Never did...

A few months pass and I see a similar shoe in RenoDeano's TAT report. Turns it it was his shoe, but he had thrown the mate away.

quota screwed with this post 08-09-2010 at 10:03 PM
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 09:08 AM   #28
Patrol Dog
Just Livin the Dream!
 
Patrol Dog's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Oddometer: 17
Badmouthing Nevada

Ok, as you can see Bert is kind of touchy with bad things being said about the great state of Nevada. You have to understand, this is his home state and I think he is planning on running for public office in the future.

I'm not sure about Battle Mountain being the "Armpit of America" but what I am sure about is that they have one mighty fine mosquito farm. A river runs right on the edge of town and we ran into as fine a hungry mosquito swarm as I have ever experienced.

If you noticed, it didn't say anything about bug repellent on Quota's list. If you didn't.... take notice. Utah has it's own marvelous mosquitoes but of course can't hold a candle to the ones in the great state of Nevada. (just putting a good plug in for Bert) The mosquitoes in Oregon can't hold a candle either to their Nevadan cousins, but to their credit, they don't quit until they get the job done.

It had been a great trip until Quota broke down. He was gracious to wait until we got close to home. A new record was set... some 30+ hours without Cheetos. There were no broken bones. I walked six inches off the ground for 3 weeks after getting home. The trip was that much fun and truly we were "Livin the Dream."

Of course we did get back to Battle Mountain to finish the trip to the coast. Quota bought a new bike, and I did some suspension mods to the DR. We enrolled a couple of more friends to tag along....I guess if you are still here you will stick around for more ride report.
__________________
We do not stop playing and riding because we are old....we grow old because we stop playing and riding!
Patrol Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 04:36 PM   #29
Bert Fox
Casual Adventurer
 
Bert Fox's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: Elko, NV USA
Oddometer: 455
In Response:

We consider mosquitoes as part of our abundant wildlfe. I use to brag about em until I lived around 49* N Latitude. I guess up there they knew they had a short season....
Bert
__________________
Wells, NV
"Riding with one leg is waaay better than not riding!"
GNATSASS Great Basin Dualsport/Adventure Bike Tours
www.gnatsass.net
Find us on Facebook. GNATSASS
Bert Fox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 04:55 PM   #30
quota OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert Fox
Say what you will about the "Armpit of America" in the NY Times, but how many places can boast an unemployment rate of 5% and an average hourly worker can make $100,000 a year if he is willing to put in overtime? If it isn't grown, it has to be mined!
Long Live GNATSASS!
I understand. The few time I've been through Battle Mountain, I've wondered why some of this money isn't being reinvested in the community to "spruce" things up a bit. But then, I realize that it is a mining town. The town I live in used to be a mining town. The mining business is very cyclical and has its ups and downs. Miners are also a very transient workforce.

The houses that originally housed the miners in our town were really just built as temporary structures to keep the weather off. The miners weren't home much because they were always hard at work. As long as they were dry and kind of warm when they slept, that is what was important.

I'm guessing that nobody wants to invest much into the town, because they know at some point, the mines will close or slow down and the place will turn into a bit of a ghost town. Its just business.

As a motel owner, you don't want to replace the 47 year old carpet in the room, because next year you could be running at only 15% occupancy, even though you are at 85% this year. You are already getting these filthy motorcycle riders that will pay to stay there, and they would just get new carpet dirty.

More about BM.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp...nguage=printer
http://www.cse.unr.edu/~mees/bmsite/index.html

quota screwed with this post 08-10-2010 at 05:04 PM
quota is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014