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Old 01-25-2010, 06:30 PM   #1
David Shapiro OP
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Looking to import a K1300R to the U.S.

My dream bike. It may or may not be possible to import , depending on it's emission status. If it's to the European standard, as told to me by BMW Canada, it's illegal. If it's to the US standard, as told to me by a registered importer, it's a go. Hopefully, I'll know tomorrow. Oh well, I might just have to settle with a Megamoto.

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Old 01-25-2010, 08:42 PM   #2
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From one David to another... fo-get about it! Yeah, the Canadian bike is US legal, but unless BMW formally certifies it (and they won't) you cannot bring it in. At least not easily (if at all). We've had this discussion on a couple of BMW forums. I love my K1200R and will ONLY trade it for the K1300R... maybe next year.

What "we" used to do, back in the old days when bringing Euro cars into the states, was register or re-register them for an earlier year or a different model that either was allowed or didn't require an emissions check. Tough to do that now.

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Old 01-25-2010, 09:05 PM   #3
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Pre-dotcom crash days, I imported a Ferrari Maranello. That actually worked out well, but there was a lot of work to make it legal. BUT, it wasn't emissions work, it was structural. Emissions is the big bugaboo. My Chicago dealer says to wait, He's convinced that they will be imported soon. Who knows?

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Old 01-26-2010, 08:30 AM   #4
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Canadian bikes are European spec'd bikes.

If you buy it from a Canadian dealer, I wonder if a letter from the dealer saying it has had all its recalls done (a standard procedure) and it complies with US emissions will suffice. I doubt it, because CDN bikes don't come with that stupid cannister that US bikes are required to have.

Hey, you can buy it for me, I'll break it in for you and then you can "borrow" and keep it in the US
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Old 01-26-2010, 09:32 AM   #5
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It has to be certified by the DOT (Dept of Transportation) and the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) before it can be made street legal, and neither of those processes are cheap or easy (Read: impossible). The current administration (no politics intended) is very militant in their environmental stands, so I doubt anyone would get a friendly reception for a dilemma like this one.
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Old 01-26-2010, 09:44 AM   #6
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Free trade, huh!?

Let us know how it goes David and good luck with it.
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:05 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gadget Boy
Canadian bikes are European spec'd bikes.

If you buy it from a Canadian dealer, I wonder if a letter from the dealer saying it has had all its recalls done (a standard procedure) and it complies with US emissions will suffice. I doubt it, because CDN bikes don't come with that stupid cannister that US bikes are required to have.

Hey, you can buy it for me, I'll break it in for you and then you can "borrow" and keep it in the US
Maybe... the parts book (non-US) shows the carbon canister and though Canadian bikes are often Euro, I have been told by dealers that the K1300R is to USA specs. But, I was also told, (could be wrong but...) that getting it through emissions is not possible without BMW NA signing off on it as a USA spec. bike and they will not. The reason is obvious: USA dealers would then have to have to worry about warranty on the bike. Maybe there's a way around this but...

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Old 01-26-2010, 10:19 AM   #8
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Back when the Suzuki SV650 was first released in the states, the S model was not available in the states. Motorcycle Consumer News imported and wrote a how to article about it. They big hurdle is a memo on BMW letter head stating that it meets US standards. Suzuki stopped doing this a few years ago. If you are in Europe and buy a euro spec model that is sold in the states, like a Honda Fireblade, then it is easier, but if you buy one that is not available then it is a bit more difficult. As far as emissions, European emissions are more strict than 49 state and I think Euro 4 standards are more strict than CARB. It is possible and invovles alot of paperwork, but can be done.
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Old 01-26-2010, 12:09 PM   #9
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It can be done, I'm convinced. All BMWs meet Euro 3 standards, so emissions is an easy hurdle.

Getting the bike titled from Canada to the states is something I have seen done, though I have never done it myself. Here in the Detroit area, we have an excellent dealer who would be much more knowledgable than I am about it.

It's a new bike, right? How much different would it be than a 3 or 5 year old bike coming across the border?
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Old 01-26-2010, 12:13 PM   #10
David Shapiro OP
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It's actually used, since I'm a cheapskate at heart.

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Old 01-26-2010, 12:15 PM   #11
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very different.
It goes from a conversation about new vehicle standards to a simple gray market transaction when you age the bike x years.
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Old 01-26-2010, 01:44 PM   #12
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This page is fun: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...elig123109.pdf actual list of cars & bikes as of Dec '09.

and... http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...l#Anchor-20795

"3. Requirements to lawfully import motorcycles or motor-driven cycles for on-road use.

If a motorcycle or motor driven cycle is capable of a top speed above 20 miles per hour and is equipped with components (such as lights, mirrors, and turn signals) that are needed for on-road use, NHTSA will regard it as having been primarily manufactured for such purposes. Motorcycles and motor-driven cycles with these capabilities and equipment cannot be lawfully imported into the U.S. unless they were originally manufactured to comply with all applicable FMVSS and bear a label certifying such compliance that is permanently affixed by the original manufacturer. The label must be affixed to a permanent member of the vehicle, as close as is practicable to the intersection of the steering post and the handle bars, so that its contents can be easily read without moving any part of the vehicle except for the steering mechanism. In addition, the vehicle’s manufacturer is required to submit to NHTSA identifying information on itself and the products it manufactures to the FMVSS (as required by 49 CFR Part 566), provide NHTSA with information the agency would need to decipher the VIN the manufacturer is required (under 49 CFR Part 565) to assign to each motor vehicle manufactured for sale in the U.S., and designate a U.S. resident as its agent for service of process (as required under 49 CFR 551.45)."


And... http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...l#Anchor-58194

And Canada stuff: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...da01192007.htm

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Old 01-26-2010, 03:09 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scrannel
This page is fun: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...elig123109.pdf actual list of cars & bikes as of Dec '09.

and... http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...l#Anchor-20795

"3. Requirements to lawfully import motorcycles or motor-driven cycles for on-road use.

If a motorcycle or motor driven cycle is capable of a top speed above 20 miles per hour and is equipped with components (such as lights, mirrors, and turn signals) that are needed for on-road use, NHTSA will regard it as having been primarily manufactured for such purposes. Motorcycles and motor-driven cycles with these capabilities and equipment cannot be lawfully imported into the U.S. unless they were originally manufactured to comply with all applicable FMVSS and bear a label certifying such compliance that is permanently affixed by the original manufacturer. The label must be affixed to a permanent member of the vehicle, as close as is practicable to the intersection of the steering post and the handle bars, so that its contents can be easily read without moving any part of the vehicle except for the steering mechanism. In addition, the vehicle’s manufacturer is required to submit to NHTSA identifying information on itself and the products it manufactures to the FMVSS (as required by 49 CFR Part 566), provide NHTSA with information the agency would need to decipher the VIN the manufacturer is required (under 49 CFR Part 565) to assign to each motor vehicle manufactured for sale in the U.S., and designate a U.S. resident as its agent for service of process (as required under 49 CFR 551.45)."


And... http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...l#Anchor-58194

And Canada stuff: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...da01192007.htm
So you need a sticker near the headstock to import a bike into the US? (Okay, yes, I only skimmed that paragraph)

Looks like BMW calls out that as a separate part number for the K1300R and I believe you can get one if that's the hurdle (?). I can't believe that Canada spec BMW would be any different, nor fail to meet FMVSS or NHTSA standards.
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Old 01-26-2010, 03:24 PM   #14
scrannel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillbillypolack
So you need a sticker near the headstock to import a bike into the US? (Okay, yes, I only skimmed that paragraph)

Looks like BMW calls out that as a separate part number for the K1300R and I believe you can get one if that's the hurdle (?). I can't believe that Canada spec BMW would be any different, nor fail to meet FMVSS or NHTSA standards.
You skimmed all right, dude... sticker is not the issue, the LETTER from BMW NA saying your bike is cool to import is the hard part. They may be the same bike, but without that letter you cannot import it. If you got to the PDF document there is a list of BMW bikes allowed to be imported as of Dec '09.

"...In addition, the vehicle’s manufacturer is required to submit to NHTSA identifying information on itself and the products it manufactures to the FMVSS (as required by 49 CFR Part 566), provide NHTSA with information the agency would need to decipher the VIN the manufacturer is required (under 49 CFR Part 565) to assign to each motor vehicle manufactured for sale in the U.S., and designate a U.S. resident as its agent for service of process (as required under 49 CFR 551.45)."

If you go on line and read the links, it's actually worse than that...
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Old 01-26-2010, 03:32 PM   #15
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I don't get it, Canada is the tenth of the US market, and probably even less when it comes to bikes.. so why do we get it here and not in the US. Maybe it's too much trouble to find a place to hang that fugly cannister that's required for entry into the US.
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