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Old 09-11-2010, 09:45 AM   #166
MIOB
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Wow.
Wow.
Wow.

Excellent report, excellent pictures!!!

Thank you very much for sharing. Subscribed.

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Old 09-11-2010, 05:21 PM   #167
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Originally Posted by yeuop
Absolutely fantastic trip!!!!
I wish I could go there!!

You surely can. Just do it.
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Old 09-11-2010, 05:28 PM   #168
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Originally Posted by Snowkarver
Franki, your RR and photography are fantastic. Trips like this are what inspired me to take up motorcycling (I'm such a n00b, I don't own a bike yet and won't even be taking my basic MSF course until next week!). Also, as a kid who grew up in the Hong Kong of the 70s and 80s, it blows my mind that are actually adventure riders from there who are now exploring every far-flung corner of "dai luk".

Awesome stuff, thank you for sharing.
Snowkarver, don't judge a book by its cover. There are mamy tigers and dragons in HK I am just a black sheep of the family You are always welcomed back for a visit and may be go to 'dai luk' for a ride ?

Good luck on your MSF course, I heard they are great
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Old 09-11-2010, 05:37 PM   #169
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Hello from the USA.

I am new to ADV and have read your entire RR in the last two days. First off, I would like to say you all are very tough riders. I have only been on paved roads myself and see we are very spoiled here. I have an interest in Tibet as I myself am buddhist and find it such a fascinating culture. The places you have been are absolutely breathtaking.

Do you know much about the geology of the area? It seems you were on some lava flows in the northern plateau. Did you see any active volcanic vents near some of the lake beds? I know that is how you can sometimes get an inland sea, or large lake, with salt in it.

Lastly, you need to tell me how Capt. Kool got his nickname. I was hoping to go to China several years ago with my ShaoLin Kung Fu school, but it did not happen due to bird flu scare and financial constraints.

I would be happy to give you any help in the Northern midwest. I am roughly 180 miles north west of Chicago in south central Wisconsin.

Cheers!

Charlotte
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:36 PM   #170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeyWhatever
Hello from the USA.

I am new to ADV and have read your entire RR in the last two days. First off, I would like to say you all are very tough riders. I have only been on paved roads myself and see we are very spoiled here. I have an interest in Tibet as I myself am buddhist and find it such a fascinating culture. The places you have been are absolutely breathtaking.

Do you know much about the geology of the area? It seems you were on some lava flows in the northern plateau. Did you see any active volcanic vents near some of the lake beds? I know that is how you can sometimes get an inland sea, or large lake, with salt in it.

Lastly, you need to tell me how Capt. Kool got his nickname. I was hoping to go to China several years ago with my ShaoLin Kung Fu school, but it did not happen due to bird flu scare and financial constraints.

I would be happy to give you any help in the Northern midwest. I am roughly 180 miles north west of Chicago in south central Wisconsin.

Cheers!

Charlotte
Greetings from China.
Adventure touring is all about having fun. It is a risky activity and everyone's acceptance to risk level is different. Therefore, as long as you are having fun doing it and still have good health and spirite afterwards, you are doing OK. I never compare what I do with others.

The whoe Tibet/Qinghai plateau was formed by the rise of Hilmalayas and many places including Xinjiang use to be under the sea many years ago. I have not seen and volcano nor did I know of any in Tibet. It is the world's thickest crust here you know. But there are plenty of geo-thermo hot springs especially at south-eastern part of Tibet.

Capt. Kool being a young lad think he is a cool guy. I think he still need some polishing in life to be able to be cool. Till then, he is kool to me. Since his riding experience is 40 years behind me, we jokingly crowned him road capt. for this trip. This is how he got his name Capt. Kool.

Thanks for your offer to help my upcoming N. America trip. Any offer will be greatly appreciated. Don't mind me ask for pointers when I start to make route plans early next year.

Chhers,

Franki
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:48 PM   #171
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Thank-you for this wonderful gift.
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Old 09-12-2010, 02:44 AM   #172
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While having our R&R in Siquanghe, we performed bike maintenance, spent most of our time updating our RR in internet cafes. We also enjoyed Xinjiang food for a change (very close to the border with Xinjiang).





Servicing our bikes in a bike shop means lending tools from them and work on the bike ourselves. We just can't trust the quality of work performed by the shop. Here Jon is changing oil while a bunch of youngsters look on.



From Siquanghe to Baga and Pulan are all well paved asphalt roads. This is our first section of the G219 (Xinjiang Tibet National Road). So we can enjoy a few days off the dusty tracks before we hit road construction again. It took us only half a day to ride from Siquanghe to Taqin. There we saw many Indians, Nepalese and Tibetan pilgrims doing their rounds at Mt. Kailash. Mt. Kailash is recognized by 4 religions to be the holy mountain and centre of the world. There is a naturally formed sign of Buddha on the peak and it looks majestic. It took Tibetans one day to hike around Mt. Kailash (about 51 km) and 3 days for tourist doing it leisurely). So I and Jon spent the whole afternoon paying respect to Mt. Kailash while Capt. Kool stayed in the room licking his wound. We experienced some extreme weather while we were at the foot of Mt. Kailash, sunny, rain, hail storm and strong wind. We sure did felt the presence of God there. This extreme weather didn’t seem to have any affect on the Tibetan pilgrims. Armed with a walking stick (tree branches they brought with them from home) they walked from 5am to 5pm to make one round. They have neither rain gear nor Gore-tex jacket, just what they wear everyday. None wear hiking boots, just normal shoes or sneakers. I was told the really faithful ones will walk around 99 times and then be allowed to go one level up the mountain. Faith is a powerful thing.





New milestone of our journey





Mt. Kailash

















A kind of beaver that can be seen everwhere in this area





Paying respect to Mt. Kailash





The peak of Mt. Kailash





The Yak caravan





Hail storm approaching











Sky burial ground - only clothes were left behind, the rest went to heaven





Mani pile and prayer flags



























Pilgrims of Mt. Kailash





Dusk at Taqin
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Old 09-12-2010, 11:06 AM   #173
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The pictures of Wenbu village, the sacred lake of Dangqiongcou and Mt. Kailash are very moving. I certainly didn't get the same feeling when I viewed the Rocky Mountains in western Canada, even though they are awesome piles of rock. Which just might be typical of our western point of view. We see big rocks and Tibetans see "God" (or their teacher) and the path to the next life. Another way of saying this is that you see what you bring to the moment.

I can hardly pretend to understand their way of thinking, even though I think I would share some of these beliefs. But I thank you for taking me along on your spiritual journey. And more important, thanks for making me see a little more.

This was a particularly moving image:

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Old 09-12-2010, 02:57 PM   #174
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Hey Franki,

I'm just a guy in Minnesota USA that will never likely get to China, but MAN what a place!! Your photos are inspiring! It's too bad that I pay for cable TV, but the best entertainment in on advrider.com. I'd really like some savvy producer to pick up on the idea of latching onto different inmates and following them along to different places in the world. It would make a great reality TV series. If Ewan and Charlie can do it once or twice in England, then why wouldn't it do great here is the U.S.? THAT would be TV worth watching. Imagine the impact you could have on people's imagination and alter their perception of the rest of the world? Especially here in America, we need that. RRs like yours connect me with the rest of the world in a way that I would otherwise not be able to experience. Thank you for posting your reports and photos.
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Old 09-12-2010, 03:26 PM   #175
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Old 09-12-2010, 04:31 PM   #176
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indochine
The pictures of Wenbu village, the sacred lake of Dangqiongcou and Mt. Kailash are very moving. I certainly didn't get the same feeling when I viewed the Rocky Mountains in western Canada, even though they are awesome piles of rock. Which just might be typical of our western point of view. We see big rocks and Tibetans see "God" (or their teacher) and the path to the next life. Another way of saying this is that you see what you bring to the moment.

I can hardly pretend to understand their way of thinking, even though I think I would share some of these beliefs. But I thank you for taking me along on your spiritual journey. And more important, thanks for making me see a little more.

This was a particularly moving image:

Indo. You've got to see it to believe it.

When you look at Castle Mountain, an impressive sight in the Canadian Rockies, you're looking at a peak just shy of 9100ft. You're seeing it from about 4900ft in the Bow Valley, so you're looking at about 4200ft of rock.

Franki's looking at these peaks from the Tibetan Plateau which sits around 4500 meters(14,750ft). Mt. Kailash is 21,778ft at it's peak. He's seeing nearly 7,000 ft of rock on the horizon. And that's really something.

If you want to have your mind blown further, as I'm sure Franki will attest, travel south into Nepal and look back to the north.

From Pokhara, which sits at 2,624ft, looking to the north is Annapurna 1 at 26,545ft. You're looking at 24,000ft of rock just 30kms away.

That takes up a lot of sky. And you'll never see the Rockies the same way again.

This has been an amazing Ride Report. One of my favourites on ADV. The photography and the comentary have been excellent. My only wish is that the pictues were posted in a larger format to better enjoy their beauty.

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Old 09-12-2010, 06:27 PM   #177
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Franki I've been been an avid follower of your RRs for ages. This one was beautiful but I loved them all equally

I definitely intend to move to China some time in the near future so I hope we can go riding and you can show me the ropes around there then. At this stage I'm only an aspiring ADV but hopefully I can get some miles and experience here in Aus before heading over.

BTW I remember you mentioning some Chinese ADV/biking forums where you also post your reports... I wonder if you can send us a link?
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Old 09-12-2010, 07:14 PM   #178
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lornce
Indo. You've got to see it to believe it.

When you look at Castle Mountain, an impressive sight in the Canadian Rockies, you're looking at a peak just shy of 9100ft. You're seeing it from about 4900ft in the Bow Valley, so you're looking at about 4200ft of rock.

Franki's looking at these peaks from the Tibetan Plateau which sits around 4500 meters(14,750ft). Mt. Kailash is 21,778ft at it's peak. He's seeing nearly 7,000 ft of rock on the horizon. And that's really something.

If you want to have your mind blown further, as I'm sure Franki will attest, travel south into Nepal and look back to the north.

From Pokhara, which sits at 2,624ft, looking to the north is Annapurna 1 at 26,545ft. You're looking at 24,000ft of rock just 30kms away.

That takes up a lot of sky. And you'll never see the Rockies the same way again.

This has been an amazing Ride Report. One of my favourites on ADV. The photography and the comentary have been excellent. My only wish is that the pictues were posted in a larger format to better enjoy their beauty.

Hey Lornce, good to hear from you.

I imagine myself visiting Tibet in the next couple of years since I'll be in the neighbourhood. The route Franki followed, though, was probably made manageable by his local knowledge, and ability to speak Chinese and deal with authorities. I would have to choose another approach, I would think. Ideas, Franki?

I, too, would have liked images with a little more resolution so I can fill my laptop screen with Tibetan wallpaper.
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Old 09-12-2010, 09:02 PM   #179
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indochine
The pictures of Wenbu village, the sacred lake of Dangqiongcou and Mt. Kailash are very moving. I certainly didn't get the same feeling when I viewed the Rocky Mountains in western Canada, even though they are awesome piles of rock. Which just might be typical of our western point of view. We see big rocks and Tibetans see "God" (or their teacher) and the path to the next life. Another way of saying this is that you see what you bring to the moment.

I can hardly pretend to understand their way of thinking, even though I think I would share some of these beliefs. But I thank you for taking me along on your spiritual journey. And more important, thanks for making me see a little more.

This was a particularly moving image:


Thank you for your insight. It helps me to become a better reporter

To give you a bigger moving image may help to show my appreciation
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Old 09-12-2010, 09:10 PM   #180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bighaasfly
Hey Franki,

I'm just a guy in Minnesota USA that will never likely get to China, but MAN what a place!! Your photos are inspiring! It's too bad that I pay for cable TV, but the best entertainment in on advrider.com. I'd really like some savvy producer to pick up on the idea of latching onto different inmates and following them along to different places in the world. It would make a great reality TV series. If Ewan and Charlie can do it once or twice in England, then why wouldn't it do great here is the U.S.? THAT would be TV worth watching. Imagine the impact you could have on people's imagination and alter their perception of the rest of the world? Especially here in America, we need that. RRs like yours connect me with the rest of the world in a way that I would otherwise not be able to experience. Thank you for posting your reports and photos.
Hi Bighassfly,

What a great idea myou have Too bad not many savvy producer are adventure bikers or have an eye for activities like this.

In the mean time, please invite as many people as you can to read these RRs so they can get some feelings or understanding about what we are passionate about.
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