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Old 01-27-2015, 11:19 AM   #1
ONandOFF OP
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Laugh Installing Sicass racing's street electrics on a KTM - 2015 300 XC-W

Howdy fellow ADV'ers!

I put the Sicass dual-sport kit on my 2015 300 XC-W and would like to share the experience with those here who may be contemplating doing likewise. I went into it cold, not knowing what to put on, nor from whom. But several folks pointed to the Sicass as the go-to solution. This is a well designed kit that is easy to put on. It's also the only kit I found that doesn't come with a replacement headlight and/or taillight section - it uses the ones that come with the bike.

Their instructions are a bit brief, perhaps leaving many details to the installer to figure out, and certainly in an order that didn't seem logical to me. For instance, they direct to connect the horn to the wires first, then mount it. Details... And they seem to have you connect parts of the wiring harness before running it. Anyway, I read through the instructions, then came up with my own preferred sequence of events. My preference is to mount all the peripherals first, then wire everything up.

Getting the back ready, the turn signals, tag light, and tag holder go on the taillight assembly, then the wires get routed into the airbox. There are no details in the instructions about how or where to mount the DOT rear signal stalks. It wasn't hard to figure out, but they left it to me to ponder it for a while. I found recesses on the underside of the tail light assembly that appeared to be made for signal mounting, and a dimple in the center which appears to be for wire routing. I drilled three holes to fit snugly. The tag light mounting is a bit cheesy using only double-stick tape. On mine, the tape on the top side didn't reach the above fender, and I was uncomfortable with that approach anyway as I'd like to be able to disassemble it in the future without it being stuck together with double-stick tape. Time will tell if it holds; now that it's back together I wish I'd put a bracket on it. If it comes loose, I will. Routing the wires into the airbox while keeping them along their prescribed route in the channel was a bit of a challenge, but doable. This was before I mounted the signals.



Signal mounts and plate mounts from underneath:



The license plate holder bolt holes didn't quite match up with my license plate...



Putting in the rear brakelight switch, the banjo bolt was a bit difficult to access using their procedure of removing one mounting bolt and loosening the other, so I pulled both bolts and slid the whole master cylinder out into the open. I used a large adjustable wrench to hold the body of it while torquing on the banjo bolt.



The wire routing suggested seemed sub-optimal. I wanted to keep it secured as far from the exhaust pipe as I could, plus, I wanted the connector to end up in the airbox instead of out in the open above the engine. To accomplish this, I ran the wire up the rear leg and dremeled little slots in the plastic underbelly and the platic cover to accommodate the wire.





This, in turn, set the connectors further back than the kit designers anticipated, and as such the wire from the front brake light swich didn't reach. Looking it over, the wire to the rear brake light switch connector was about as much too long as the one from the front was too short, so I opted to cut them both off, switch positions, and reattach.





There's a few ways to accomplish the wire splicing. Here's my style. I staggered the splices in such a way as to preserve the original polarity, due to general principle, as if that mattered on brake light switches.







The bar switches, ignition switch, and front signals were easy mounts. I routed the wires along the same paths as the factory wiring on the switches I was removing. Same with the kill switch wire to the coil area. The horn was another story! There just wasn't enough area behind the headlight shroud to mount it comfortably, and to mount it in front of the radiator with the supplied bracket made me uncomfortable about how for out the weight was from the mounting point. I knew it would jiggle around incessantly and wouldn't stay put like that. I probably spent more time trying to find the best compromise location to mount the horn than any other single thing. After struggling with many options, I finally decided to mount it in the airbox for now and use the battery holding strap as a mount. I had to run the horn wires back down the frame, along with the main harness and the separate front brake switch harness, and extend the horn wires to reach.



I came into contention with the design approach when I realized the "key switch", or ignition switch, I purchased was wired to the connectors to open the circuit to only the start button when "off" (it also grounds the magneto to prevent sparking) but leaving the electrics "live" on the battery. The way they designed it to work, the horn, turn signals, and brake lights run on DC, which can be supplied by the battery when the engine is off. The tail light, front running light, and headlight are intended to be run directly from the stator (AC) such that if the engine stops, the lights go out. (Or if you connected the "test" tab to the DC setting, there would be no way to turn the lights off.) The designers' concept might please most folks, but not me. I want front and rear lights if the engine quits, and I want my key switch to disconnect all the accessories from the battery when turned off. That required a bit of redesign and custom wiring.

They inform the charging system is not strong enough to run all the lights and still charge the battery, so I came up with a good compromise, run everything but the headlight on DC, switched through the key switch, and run just the headlight bulb on AC. That way I still have the tail light and small front light on if the engine stops while the key is still on, and the real power consumer is running on AC so it's not taxing the charging system.

First, I cut the normally-open contact wires from the ignition switch near the connector. I also cut the incoming fused 12V DC line from the battery, near the large connector.



Then I put on slide connectors, from the few extras that came with the kit, on the switch wires, and installed matching connectors on the battery supply line. Now, the ignition switch is inserted into the battery line to open it when not in use, like a normal motorcycle that comes with street electrics. And with the connectors I used, in the orientation I chose, a side benefit is that I can bypass the switch easily should it happen to fail out on the trail.



As for the starter button, I wired that to the switched DC so it can't be engaged with the key switch off. That's the black wire on the connector I cut off that came connected to the key switch. The "free" red wire on the adjacent connector that I cut from the switch is the original unswitched DC power to the start button - I insulated that and secured it - it doesn't connect to anything anymore but I sure don't want it shorting to anything.

To get the tail light and little front light (they run on the little white wires which I pulled off the original pull switch) to run on the DC with the horn, turn sigs, and brake light - I plugged that into the DC line at the test point using the extra double-male insulated connector supplied with the kit. Then I ran the stator output (AC - two yellow wires from original pull-on light switch) to the headlight switch by plugging that connector into the red power line shown.

And that's pretty much it for the electrics using the Sicass products.





I bought the kit and extras which include keyed ignition switch, front brake application sensing switch, and combo kill/start buttons handlebar switch. Is there really $475 worth of hardware supplied? Hardly, but when you factor in the amortization of the design cost, the cost for building the harnesses with connectors, the cost for stocking and being able to ship at a moment's notice - that's another story. I did get the stuff very fast and the people were very pleasant and accommodating to work with. And everything fit, and works! What's all that worth?

In conclusion, I don't hesitate to reccommend to anyone considering it to get this kit. My installation was notably more involved than the standard installation, so if the design limitations as-supplied are acceptable, than it's a much quicker install. Knowing what I know now, I'd probably buy the components and make my own custom kit, saving over half the cost but increasing labor drastically. That's fine for me because I have more time than money these days. The Sicass kit rocks for installation ease, looks, and function; I'm very happy with the results.
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Old 01-27-2015, 12:17 PM   #2
RRM707
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Great write up! I totally agree on the cost vs. what you get with this kit.

I saw this kit for my '13 at Rocky Mountain for $315. It's worth it.

I just got my 300 last month, & the original owner paid the dealer to make it street legal,

using factory KTM parts. He spent lots of money, so the Sicass kit could be

considered a bargain, lol. I'm about to wire up my 500.

Thx!
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RRM707 screwed with this post 01-27-2015 at 12:33 PM
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Old 01-27-2015, 01:43 PM   #3
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Thanks for the props, man! And earlier with the suggestions. The protection stuff and DOT tires should be here in the next couple days. The KTM dealer suggested Sicass. I saw the kit at Rocky Mtn also, and would have liked to enjoy the savings, but I wanted to be sure with all DOT signals for inspection, and the RM kit is the standard version with the non-DOT side mount rears, so I ordered direct from Sicass. Have fun on the 500!
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Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
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Old 01-28-2015, 12:59 AM   #4
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I would kill to be able to plate a smoker like that in California. Man... Someday I need to do my "once-in-a-liftime" special build that California allows and get me a smoker with blinker. Nicely done!
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Old 01-28-2015, 01:01 AM   #5
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Lucky bastard.
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Old 01-28-2015, 01:34 AM   #6
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Cool write up!!!


But...I'm just dying to know what your license plate number is. Why you deny me this ???
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Old 01-28-2015, 10:26 AM   #7
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Thanks for the detailed write up. Been wondering about this product.
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Old 01-28-2015, 01:57 PM   #8
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Thanks guys!

Wattner, you'll just have to wait until you get up here. How's that for incentive?
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Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
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Old 01-28-2015, 05:46 PM   #9
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Nice job detailing that out. I have the same Sicass kit on my 2012 300 XCW as well. Quality components, and everything fit nicely. although I wired it up per their directions, and not to the level of detail that you have done. Out of curiosity, where did you mount the key switch?,
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Old Yesterday, 07:40 AM   #10
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Thanks; how about that, the key switch is lost in the photos. Here's the cockpit (bike's back apart for other items - spark arrestor, grab handle, radiator braces, pipe guard, skid plate, and the biggie today - dot tires with tubliss rim locks. Looks like my EE handguards aren't going to fit, with the lever positioning I've chosen; gotta figure something out but that can wait for now.)

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Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
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Old Yesterday, 04:56 PM   #11
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Thanks! Similar to how I did mine, however mine is on the opposite side, and on the inside of the handlebar mount. I had a hard time getting it to fit on the outside, so I went with the inside location instead. I didn't know if you may have come up with a clever location, with all the other slick tricks you had with the wiring!
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Old Yesterday, 08:45 PM   #12
ONandOFF OP
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Actually, I thought about putting it down on the side. But then I ran out of energy for slick tricks.
I may have to come up with something to be able to mount debris deflector handguards, though.
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Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
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