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Old 11-19-2011, 07:45 AM   #301
kirkster70 OP
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Originally Posted by mike-s View Post
That is a nifty bit of repairwork.

I am looking forward to the day we buy a place with a garage where i can do this suff relatively unimpeded.

I am able to do it by running a LONG power cord from my neighbours down outside our unit block to a sheltered area underneath, but viable as it it, it still feels hell-cowboy and i've yet to try it, though she's quite happy for me to do it. My welder is only a 110Ampre stick one and will happily run on standard mains cords.

Hmm, i might try it out sometime soon, just get some stock together and have at it & see what i come up with.
Thanks, Mike!

Go for it! Once you get the ball rolling, you will be surprised at what you can do with a welder.
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:00 AM   #302
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Start with some raw ingredients...



Add a pinch of mutilation...



Set the oven, and we'll be eating cookies in 8 minutes! YES!



Seriously. Welding is just like baking cookies. Use the right "ingredients", set the "oven" right, and the "cookies" turn out great.



I set my machine for 3/16" material, flowing argon/co2 @ 25 cfh, using 0.35 solid wire. I like the 0.35 size because as you can see from the chart on the welder, you can use it on thin materials all the way up to 1/2". I normally use the "pulling" technique - starting farthest away and "pulling" the weld to me. The pencil line on the paper demonstrates the pattern i use to get the weld shown above. I pause for a split second on the outer left and right edges for good penetration. Why hack up a perfectly good wrench? KLRistas already know...



Just in case you're not a KLRista, it's a homemade "Doohickey" tool for balancer lever / spring replacement. My KLR has 22,000 miles and just started feeling a little more buzzy than normal. I could feel it through the pegs. Upon inspection, I don't even see the lever spring. $40 worth of Eagle Mike parts will solve that.

kirkster70 screwed with this post 11-19-2011 at 08:13 AM
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:51 AM   #303
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not any more






SAE on a metric??




cool stuff BTW. i bought a cheap HF spool welder. tried to do some stuff and gave up.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:03 AM   #304
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Originally Posted by Dorzok View Post
cool stuff BTW. i bought a cheap HF spool welder. tried to do some stuff and gave up.
You can't expect too much with low duty cycle welders (you get what you pay for), but you can get pretty good results if you are patient. Mostly its just practice and learning for the operator that makes the biggest difference.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:47 AM   #305
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Yup. I dont have a nifty guide table on the front of mine to tell me where to set the dials. But this thread makes me want to bust it out and start melting metal.

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Old 11-19-2011, 12:30 PM   #306
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Yes, you are 100% right - it's metric, but the 1 1/4" SAE is close enough to to have enough flat surface to hold. Try finding a 32mm (I think) box wrench at your local auto parts store. Not gonna happen.

Plus, I did some sluething first and discovered others have already been there-done that with a 1 1/4" wrench, so I let her rip.

- and I totally agree with JamesG. You're only as good as your tools. As a matter of fact, your tools can hold you back and make you think you're not very good, when in all actuality, the tool you're using isn't very good.

Plus, lots of guys get discouraged when running flux core on a MIG. Flux core has it's place (like outside when windy) but you won't get a good looking weld with flux core. Just like stick - stick welding is comparable to flux core MIG in many ways. Nothing wrong with either process at all and they all have their place. Just don't expect to get a "pretty" weld with stick or flux core MIG.

Even a cheapy welder does pretty good if it has provisions to throw a gas bottle on it. I have nearly zero spatter running Argon/CO2.

I know one thing, I am not a certified welder, but this Miller makes me look like I know what I'm doing. I'm still learning and have a lot to learn. I have worked with many tools over the years and I do know that your tools can either hold you back or they will allow you to grow.

Hand control and proper positioning makes a world of difference. I had good hand control from my airbrushing / pinstriping days, so I had a bit of a leg up in that respect. Sometimes I will mimic the movement to make sure I can make a weld pass without bumping my elbow or other obstruction before I actually stike an arc. You learn little tricks like that as you go. Don't get discouraged. Keep trying and you will get better and better.

kirkster70 screwed with this post 11-19-2011 at 12:44 PM
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Old 11-19-2011, 04:49 PM   #307
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^ Yep, you're right. A grinder will get rid of the spatter. I use a grinder a lot when I want something to look a certain way, or if a moving part needs to fit tight to something and the weld bead is in the way. Just keep in mind that grinding too much will take some strength away from the weld.

And I'm also not saying anything bad about stick or flux-core MIG. Those welds are as strong as any other.

I just don't want anyone to be discouraged when their welds don't turn out to look a certain way and think they are doing a bad job.

TIG, MIG, flux core MIG, stick, Oxy/Acetelene all look the way they look because of the process involved. All make strong welds is done correctly.

TIG is the cleanest by far and solid wire MIG with gas is a close second.
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Old 11-19-2011, 05:03 PM   #308
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I got discourage cuz i kept burning through and i didn't know how to control it. I just need to bust out some scrap and fiddle with it.

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Old 11-19-2011, 07:49 PM   #309
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I got discourage cuz i kept burning through and i didn't know how to control it. I just need to bust out some scrap and fiddle with it.

Sent from my LG-P506 using Tapatalk
Go to a welding supply shop (or look on ebay, etc) and buy a welder's slide calculator. They make one for MIG and TIG and it's pretty handy. It shows you the recommended settings for whatever you are welding. They are only a few bucks. I had one for my TIG and it even shows the right tungsten size and material.

If you find yourself burning through using your MIG with the machine set up right, your hand speed may be too slow. That's one of the disadvantages comparing MIG to TIG. With TIG you have ultimate controllability of speed and heat. With MIG you have to move at the speed your wire is coming out at. You can turn your amperage down some, but you don't want a "cold" weld by doing so. (no penetration).

There are also a lot of very good books out there.
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:59 PM   #310
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Is this a practice piece or a gigantic fuel cell? Looks very interesting! Glueing metal together is pretty fun, isn't it?

How thick is your metal?
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:11 AM   #311
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Miller has a free weld calculator app for the iPhone that I use a lot. Not sure if it is available for the other smart phones or not.

FM

Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkster70 View Post
Go to a welding supply shop (or look on ebay, etc) and buy a welder's slide calculator. They make one for MIG and TIG and it's pretty handy. It shows you the recommended settings for whatever you are welding. They are only a few bucks. I had one for my TIG and it even shows the right tungsten size and material.

If you find yourself burning through using your MIG with the machine set up right, your hand speed may be too slow. That's one of the disadvantages comparing MIG to TIG. With TIG you have ultimate controllability of speed and heat. With MIG you have to move at the speed your wire is coming out at. You can turn your amperage down some, but you don't want a "cold" weld by doing so. (no penetration).

There are also a lot of very good books out there.
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:32 AM   #312
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Why a MIG over a TIG? Especially considering if you already have the TIG. Unless you're a production weldor and need the speed that the MIG offers, the TIG gives a lot more control over the HAZ than the MIG will and the process is a lot more flexible as far material goes.

Just asking, if you already have the Lincoln why the push for MIG?

I need something a bit more portable. For example, I need to do some welding on some stairs at one of my commercial property. I also feel I can learn to be a better welder using the MIG than the TIG by leaving some of the process up to the machine.

Lastly, the TIG machine I have is across the country, and I'll be unable to get it for at least 8 months. I did spend a decent amount on the machine ( Lincoln Precision TIG 275 with water cooler and foot controls ).
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Old 11-20-2011, 02:00 PM   #313
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Originally Posted by motoracer51 View Post
I need something a bit more portable. For example, I need to do some welding on some stairs at one of my commercial property. I also feel I can learn to be a better welder using the MIG than the TIG by leaving some of the process up to the machine.

Lastly, the TIG machine I have is across the country, and I'll be unable to get it for at least 8 months. I did spend a decent amount on the machine ( Lincoln Precision TIG 275 with water cooler and foot controls ).
The Hobart Handler is a pretty nifty little MIG machine. That combined with a portable generator makes a nice combination.
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Old 11-21-2011, 04:10 AM   #314
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Unfortunately as it's raining and i have to do my welding outside in a sheltered area, I MIGHT not be able to do it tomorrow as the last thing i need is spattering of rain near the work or anything related to it. Though here's hoping I can
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Old 11-22-2011, 04:01 AM   #315
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Thanks! Nice meeting you yesterday! Post up your handiwork when you get rolling.

I drove my dually over to kirk's house hoping to score some scraps to start a welding table. Our host was most generous with his pile and I loaded up.

I have a chinese tig machine but I dusted off the old AC buzzbox to cobble this together. I figure it would be way faster than the tig plus I could weld out in the yard where the wind would blow the fumes away instead of the tig argon



I just tried to copy kirks table, I need a place to mount my vise and a grinder maybe. I can't show the welds because they are butt-ugly.

Thanks Kirk!
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