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Old 10-22-2012, 11:04 PM   #331
legion
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You can look at a stove in a bunch of different ways I suppose but if you're going to rely on it and it gets cold where you live; you need a big box. A box big enough to take a 6" round that's not split and bigger would be better. Oh yeah... and lots of them.

I've lived in a house with a woodstove that wouldn't burn all night and I'll never forget freezing my ass off every morning. Might be ok if chilly in your area means 50*f outside.

It's entirely different when chilly means -20*f outside. Or worse.

When it comes to heat I'd tend to be a tad conservative and I'm not above opening a window for the first month or so of figuring out how to burn the new stove right. Having to get up in the middle of the night though? That ain't happening for me and when I had to; I hated it.


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Originally Posted by A-Bone View Post
So it is on the smaller size at 30k BTU...

But depending on how you are using it or if your house is well insulated, it could be plenty of stove..
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:11 AM   #332
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Originally Posted by legion View Post

It's entirely different when chilly means -20*f outside. Or worse.
that's for sure - if I'd live in Alaska it's a whole different story.
I am in Western NC at 3000ft, and we get snowed in once in a while, and we may be below freezing for weeks at times, but it is rare that we hit 10 or 15F.
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:00 AM   #333
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Originally Posted by legion View Post
...if you're going to rely on it and it gets cold where you live; you need a big box.
Not necessarily: I've found all I need is to drink a decent-sized glass of water before bed.

I get up, pee, load the stove, & go back to bed.

Works great, house stays warm, and I stay properly hydrated AND rested.

As for the advantages of other types of big boxes where it gets cold...
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:05 AM   #334
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The other thing about too small a stove is lag time. It goes out, house gets cold, you get up, throw on a load, go back to bed, 3 hours later you wake in a pool of sweat. You come home from work, the house is 45, you clean the ashes, throw on more wood, and at 7 you can take off your coat, 8 if it is really cold. Then it is almost time for bed.
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:23 AM   #335
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Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
The other thing about too small a stove is lag time. It goes out, house gets cold, you get up, throw on a load, go back to bed, 3 hours later you wake in a pool of sweat. You come home from work, the house is 45, you clean the ashes, throw on more wood, and at 7 you can take off your coat, 8 if it is really cold. Then it is almost time for bed.
I really haven't had that problem with this stove in this house maybe because it's as small as it is. It fires very well at low throttle (?) settings, too.

I built a really small guest house for my mom into which we moved the older stove from the main house. That's where I noticed the freeze/sweat/freeze cycle because the damn thing would overheat the place grievously if I left the air control just a tiny BIT too far open for say, ten SECONDS too long, and then I would basically have to let it go out to make sure the pitch wouldn't start oozing out of the T&G walls. Then it was wait till the place cooled off, and while that big stove was heating back up, the house got cold because the WIND would be blowing 60 mph.

Yeah...I let a REALLY strong batch of green tea steep too long this morning.
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Old 10-24-2012, 06:56 PM   #336
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In my area it doesn't get below freezing very often, and almost never below 20 degrees - that being very cold for this area.

My house is 1700SF and has R38 insulation in the ceiling and R31 in the floors, so it seems to be okay in that respect. I come home, turn on the central air (electric) for 20 minutes and it is up into the low 60s inside where I find it comfortable. Then I turn it off at bedtime and turn it on when I get up. It is usually in the mid to upper fifties inside when I get up and outside it is in the low 40s.

I will probably get some compressed sawdust logs to try to use in the stove for some colder weather and weekends, but I am not going to leave a fire going when I am not home.

What I was thinking the soapstone would get me was a heat sink that would store heat for a longer period without having to keep the fire going or worry about a fire going while I was away.

It would be nice to have the stove as a backup for heat and cooking. The power does go out up here (I live almost at the top of a small mountain) from time to time. Most people have gensets here - I need to get one, but it would be nice to not need the genset for heating (although I would need it for the well pump).

I'll wait and see what happens this winter. I have to get a genset regardless.
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Old 10-24-2012, 08:12 PM   #337
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FYI - current stove is Quadrafire 1900 from the late 90s.

Measuring tape says inside dimensions are roughly 13" deep by 13" high by 18" wide.

Starting a compressed sawdust log fire in it now after shoveling out many inches of ashes the POs thoughtfully left behind for me. Kind slow starting.
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Old 10-25-2012, 06:22 AM   #338
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonkee View Post
FYI - current stove is Quadrafire 1900 from the late 90s.

Measuring tape says inside dimensions are roughly 13" deep by 13" high by 18" wide.

Starting a compressed sawdust log fire in it now after shoveling out many inches of ashes the POs thoughtfully left behind for me. Kind slow starting.
Get that chimney checked/swept if you haven't already... I wouldn't trust the POs to have left it spic-n-span....

That is some serious insulation.. I would think a big stove would blast you out if you only need 20 minutes of electric heat to get you up a comfortable temperature.. but hey.. it could be like living in a sauna.. just head outside every hour or so to cool off... I know that's what I was doing last night: just went outside everytime I had to take a leak...
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Old 10-25-2012, 06:20 PM   #339
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Lots going on here - just moved in, still moving in - but I will get around to having the chimney serviced/checked out. I also need to get a temp guage for the stove and chimney.

The insulation is good, especially for a manufactured home (late 90s). I am going to have to do something about the windows though; they are double pane vinyl, but some of them are very large and will lose a lot of heat when it gets cold. I am going to get thermal curtains for the north side of the house where the many big windows are - that should help.

I ran a fire last night using some of these I got at Winco - 3 five pound compressed logs for $2.82:



Chopped one up a little to make kindling, got that going then put the rest of the log on and got that going. Then after about an hour put another full log on. Once that got going the stove was putting out some good heat so I put that last log on, closed down the air vent, turned on the ceiling fan and opened the doors to all rooms.

By midnight (3+ hours after starting) the temp had risen from 63 to 67. Two-thirty AM flames had died down a lot but there were still very strong coals and the heat was still coming off the stove. That was a bit too warm for me for sleeping - I like it closer to 60 - but it is tolerable. Bear in mind that humidity is about double what it is in the summer, so the temp diffs are more noticeable.

When I got up at 5 AM to go to work (I have a one hour commute into Portland now), the temp was 64 and I left for work without turning on the heat. I get home tonight and temp is 59.

So I am pretty pleased with the stove's performance so far, but we'll see how it does when it gets colder. I need to get some wood too - the compressed logs do okay, but per BTU they are at least twice as expensive as firewood, and neither is as quick or cheap as electricity.

That said, I want at least a month's supply of stove fuel just in case and fuel of any sort is only going to get more expensive over the long term. I do have trees on my land, but right now I am going to leave most alone and they wouldn't be dry enough to burn this year anyway.
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:57 AM   #340
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Ok fellas, I'm new to the home-ownership thing, never had a wood-burning appliance, and now I have 3.

One nice fireplace in the living room.

The Chimney is double-sided with a fireplace in the back yard. Awesome!
Before resto

After resto

In use


Even picked up some Almond wood. I know little about wood for burning, but it was cheap and dry and I know it's plentiful here in the Central Valley.


Alas, this stuff is not what this thread is about. The living room is a "formal" living room, and we are not going to spend a lot of time outside. Fireplaces are easy.

My problem is this.

It was in the house when we got it, and it's in the Den/family room...where we spend the most time.
It's got no date, I can't find ANY information about it on the net. It's cast iron, stands about 3.5ft tall with an 8x8" mouth for wood and multiple vents.

The hat comes off the top for a flat burner/water pot. PO was a flipper, so no help with history there.

Questions. (I have many, apologies in advance)
Most of the stoves you guys talk about are the conventional type and it seems no one is running a Pot-bellied or Cylinder-type stove. Is my stove practical at all? Can it heat anything? The insert needs some work, and it's definitely been used, but there are no cracks or defects.

Is Almond wood any good? I'm trying to be a bit more environmentally friendly these days, so a clean-burning wood that lasts med-long would work.

It looks like the Stove was put there, but the work never finished. There is a hole in the ceiling and a capped aluminum vent out of the roof for a ceramic chimney, but I need to have someone install the actual chimney and bring it to code/certify. How much am I looking at? Will need a chimney cap as well. This is complicated by the fact that I have a Spanish tile roof that does not take well to being walked on. I need about 5' of 6 inch stovepipe as well.

Thanks in advance, fellas. I'd really like to hang onto this old stove. It's got a ton of charm and having just bought the house 6 months ago replacing it just isn't in the budget. That said, after living in NY for 41 years, getting a wood burning stove to work for a California winter is definitely first world problems.

Any advice is greatly appreciated.
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Old 10-26-2012, 04:37 AM   #341
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Originally Posted by Cuttle View Post
sure, the small box does have his drawbacks - it does not stay on overnight, so this winter will be a nice test (we are trying not to run the propane heat)

If you'll put a damper in the pipe about a foot above the top of the stove, you'd be surprised at how much longer it will burn. Or just keep shoving Hunter out of bed at 3:00am and telling him to put another log on
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Old 10-26-2012, 05:59 AM   #342
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I'd really like to hang onto this old stove. It's got a ton of charm and having just bought the house 6 months ago replacing it just isn't in the budget.
My guess is by the paint job on that stove, it was never intended for actual use: lighting it would probably fill at least part of your house with paint fumes. That, and the rust I see on the interior (which appears to be worse than normal surface rust), recommends against lighting it. Such a stove even in excellent condition is an inefficient, dirty, short-duration heater, so IMHO it's better suited to the decorative life, or as a prop on a movie set.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:10 AM   #343
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My guess is by the paint job on that stove, it was never intended for actual use: lighting it would probably fill at least part of your house with paint fumes. That, and the rust I see on the interior (which appears to be worse than normal surface rust), recommends against lighting it. Such a stove even in excellent condition is an inefficient, dirty, short-duration heater, so IMHO it's better suited to the decorative life, or as a prop on a movie set.
I think that it is not already hooked up means the PO figured it out. I'd look for a good used wood burner and go forward from there.

It looks like a coal-burner anyway, not very efficient.

Almond is excellent firewood, by the way.

Now, the question is, do they have the Smoke Pigs where you are? In the bay area, they tell you what days you cannot burn...it's sad.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:58 AM   #344
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I think that it is not already hooked up means the PO figured it out.
I missed that one: I saw it through the eyes of an accomplished procrastinator.
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Old 10-26-2012, 10:05 AM   #345
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Originally Posted by Off the grid View Post

My problem is this.

It was in the house when we got it, and it's in the Den/family room...where we spend the most time.
It's got no date, I can't find ANY information about it on the net. It's cast iron, stands about 3.5ft tall with an 8x8" mouth for wood and multiple vents.


It looks like the Stove was put there, but the work never finished. There is a hole in the ceiling and a capped aluminum vent out of the roof for a ceramic chimney, but I need to have someone install the actual chimney and bring it to code/certify. How much am I looking at?
Good old "Parlor Stove".....that one would have been for a small parlor. They came in all sizes depending of the size of your parlor.

They also came as wood or coal burners, for coal that means a stronger firebox usually and different grates. But many would buy the coal ones and burn wood in them as they were "heavier duty".That one looks like a coaly. When the grates are missing or burned out, you may be out of luck finding replacements altough there are still people restoring them that may even have the grates or even molds to cast new ones.

Not installed yet.....I bet the PO got a quote for a proper chimney and flipped. That is if the stove itself can even be installed to code. I don't think so up here but a good chimney guy will tell you as he quotes that chimney.

I had 2 of them, one was burned out only good for decoration/charm, the other burned happily in my friend's shop for a while but he did replace it, he wasn't too happy with the heat output.

If you want info on it, may be easier to look up the foundry first and then narrow down to the stove,or stove type, but there was so many such foundries buying/copying patents or using their own designs, that even confuses the experts. Just read the chapter on "stoves" in my Encyclopedia of Antique Quebec Objects in that vintage, can make your head spin that.

I don't trust old cast iron too much anymore, we had a little stove bust open in a camp once and spill all its burning wood.Sobers you up real quick having to scram to clean up before the camp burns down and then....you freeze all night! Looked good from the outside, rotten inside.

But for some reason, all charming to me them stoves. May be in my genes, my great-great-great uncle started such a foundry in Quebec, in operation until 2004. Anyone familiar with Belanger stoves here???
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