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Old 09-28-2011, 11:00 AM   #91
Army scope jockey
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Stadler makes all the high end gear for the Deutsch Motorradpolizist. This used to be my suit when I was in San Antonio. Unfortunately here in the land of beer and brats I can't wear it. It is built like a brick shithouse
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:01 AM   #92
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:38 AM   #93
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So . . . . anyone any comments now they've had it a while? I'm giving serious thought to buying one whilst in Germany next Summer and would really appreciate some thoughts from 'long-term' owners.
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Old 12-26-2011, 04:54 AM   #94
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now I read 7 pages about a high end suit
and am left with one big question

why bother about buying THIS suit versus a nice high end summer suit AND a GTX rain suit?


what is the thing about the outer layer that will make the suit waterproof in "only 3 minutes"? if down here it starts to rain in 3 minutes I will be soaked
I like the versatility of the Olympia Moto X, but the suit only being waterproof with a liner? no thanks, same problem as with the Companero, only worse because I have to take off the suit to zip in the liner
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Old 12-26-2011, 05:06 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fiep View Post
now I read 7 pages about a high end suit
and am left with one big question

why bother about buying THIS suit versus a nice high end summer suit AND a GTX rain suit?


what is the thing about the outer layer that will make the suit waterproof in "only 3 minutes"? if down here it starts to rain in 3 minutes I will be soaked
I like the versatility of the Olympia Moto X, but the suit only being waterproof with a liner? no thanks, same problem as with the Companero, only worse because I have to take off the suit to zip in the liner
It's actually the outer that is the goretex bit. It can be zipped to the inner that contains the armor making it an integrated suit or not. If zipped together it goes on/off like any other waterproof jacket.
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Old 12-26-2011, 06:08 AM   #96
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Here's a link to a company in Germany that is very competative in price for all well known makes and offers to beat any price seen cheaper. http://biker-land.de/index.php?language=en&& Earlier this year I bought a Rukka suit from them and had it shipped to the UK which saved me some serious pounds and I can say I had no problems and was well pleased.
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Old 12-26-2011, 05:08 PM   #97
fiep
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Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
It's actually the outer that is the goretex bit. It can be zipped to the inner that contains the armor making it an integrated suit or not. If zipped together it goes on/off like any other waterproof jacket.
understood,
question still is:
why bother about buying THIS suit versus a nice high end summer suit AND a GTX rain suit?
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Old 12-28-2011, 10:01 AM   #98
Endurodude
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For me, it's the summer suit's venting that's the winner . . . AND it's completely textile. There's some great Klim stuff, right up until I notice the leather patches wherever. Being Vegan, I don't want this! The outer Gortex jacket feels excellent (I tried one on last year) and feels as though it will take some serious weather punishment. Living in England and riding to warmer climes (as you do), I need both!
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Old 01-22-2012, 06:29 AM   #99
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Anyone had any wet weather experience wearing this yet?
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Old 02-10-2012, 03:12 PM   #100
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One thing about the outer layer being the waterproof is that if you inadvertently get wet riding due to a sudden onset of rain or whatever and you get the suit wet then put on the outer layer you are going to stay wet. Where if you can put in a dry insert and keep the wet jacket off of you then you might be more comfortable if it's chilly. What do you all think?
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Old 02-13-2012, 06:05 AM   #101
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Originally Posted by Jonesky View Post
One thing about the outer layer being the waterproof is that if you inadvertently get wet riding due to a sudden onset of rain or whatever and you get the suit wet then put on the outer layer you are going to stay wet. Where if you can put in a dry insert and keep the wet jacket off of you then you might be more comfortable if it's chilly. What do you all think?
Well, if you get caught in the rain with a suit with no inner shell on you'll get wet anyways.... I don't quite understand your comment.... It takes a whole of 10 seconds to put the outer shell on...
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Old 02-13-2012, 07:26 AM   #102
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Well, if you get caught in the rain with a suit with no inner shell on you'll get wet anyways.... I don't quite understand your comment.... It takes a whole of 10 seconds to put the outer shell on...
I don't understand my own comments sometimes. What did happen to me once was taking in a lunch at altitude or a warm day and misjudging the weather thru a pass I was riding thru and soon as I got over a ridge I got wet as the weather changed rapidly. And it was a wet slick steep muddy cold affair and I couldn't stop to change gear. Once I could stop I was soaked and cold but I was able to put on the inner liners on my RP2 and was warm and dry thereafter. My fault for not seeing that coming but that's why it occurred to me in the first place.

Jonesky screwed with this post 02-13-2012 at 07:28 AM Reason: grammar
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Old 04-03-2012, 07:01 PM   #103
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Any updates from owners out there yet?

Thx,
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Old 04-24-2012, 12:08 AM   #104
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some in-store impressions

Although it is way out of my budget, I am also considering buying this suit and would love more input from those who already own it. Crucial features for me are the ability to ride through several climate zones with just one set of gear, in particular in hot climates; and excellent fit (adjustable; armor in the inner layer). The latter point was driven home to me last week when I was trying on someRev'it gear at a BMW dealership, and the fancier jacket (Defender) with higher-rated armor turned out to be less protective than a cheaper jacket (Sand) with thinner armor ... because it wasn't going to stay in place as well. (As with all products, you can read spec sheets and review until your eyes glaze over; 10 minutes of one-on-one time with the product is generally more informative.)

It seems that these two points:
* warm weather performance
* good fit

have been confirmed in reviews. I'd be interested to hear more about
* cold/wet performance
* crash protection.

According to the TT catalog, all protection (shoulder, back, elbow, hip, knee, and coccyx (=tailbone)) is SAS-TEC KNOX. If anyone knows what that means out the real world, I'm all ears :). As far as I understand, it's all CE certified; some level 1, some level 2. I don't know if one can upgrade. The suit itself is part Cordura 500, which is not really considered very safe anymore these days, and partly Cordura 2000, which is considered pretty good. It would be crucial to know where the 2000 lives, and where you have to make do with measly 500. The outer jacket is the latest Gore-tex/Cordura, similar to what all the fancy brands use for waterproofing. There is actual 3M material on the jacket, which is the sh!t for visibility.
My almost entirely uninformed opinion is that this brings the Companero roughly to the level of other high-end jackets, with likely exception of the Motoports?




Since I'm fortunate enough to live 3 miles from Touratech's only US retail store, I dropped in a couple days ago to take a look at the Companero suit. They had one on the shelf that was close to the right size for me: made for someone who's 6' like me, but probably 20 lbs heavier. My experience is limited to putting on the gear and walking around the store for an hour, which admittedly isn't much.

As soon as I put it on, I experienced a sense of peace and relief : the whole garment breathes quality, there is nothing that looks or feels flimsy or careless, and that gave me an immediate sense of security. The fabric, the pockets, the zippers, ..., everything seems dependable. You get the impression that real, breathing humans have been involved with the design process to make sure the zippers open easily, and everything can be reached without hyperextending several joints. This is rarer than it ought to be. The store also stocks some Klim jackets; they looked a bit boring and, I don't know, lower-class by comparison. (I didn't try them on.)

Wearing just the summer layer is quite comfortable. At that point it's easy to forget that you're wearing motorcycle gear. This is quite amazing given that you still have all your amor on! With both layers on, I no longer felt like I'd climb a tree for a better angle for a photo without a second thought. But I think you still could. At that point it's a little bulkier, but no worse than the BMW or Rev'it clothing I tried on; and the whole point of this suit is, for me, that you can reduce it to the summer layer when appropriate.

Although there are adjustment loops and buttons in many places, it's still important to get the sizing right; the jacket I tried on was made for someone heavier than me, and I ran out of velcro in the waist area. The adjustments on sleeves and pant legs are buttons with only 2 or 3 settings (which should correspond to 0 and 1 layers underneath, I guess). I don't know if that accomodates those of us at the far ends of the BMI scale.

The salesperson told me that she'd felt fine wearing the suit on the highway at low temperatures (that means 30s-40s where I live); I never took it outside the building but I imagine I'd want to add a layer. Since you want the suit to be pretty snug, you won't be able to add more than 1 layer; that may well have to be an electric piece depending on where you're going. Of course, if you're spending $2300 on a suit, you probably won't care about $200 extra for a heated liner.

I like the pouch for carrying the outer suit. It seems it is adequate for carrying both outer pants and jacket, but you'd have to roll them up pretty tightly to fit both in that pouch. A bit like fitting your sleeping mat in its stuff sack - you never get it as tight as it was in the store :). Probably takes some practice.

I really liked the pocket for sunglasses. I thought the transparent pocket on the left sleeve was ugly and I'd probably have it removed.

I've seen a claim somewhere that you can put on the rainpants without removing your boots; I didn't try, but I'm skeptical. (I wear BMW Santiago's, which aren't exactly tiny shoes, of course.)

The TT catalog mentions a black edition of the Companero suit. I can't quite decide if I like the standard yellow/grey look. Of course most MC gear is so screaming ugly that it's not hard to look good by comparison. In the end I think it still looks "sporty" (the way running shoes are intentionally not made too pretty), and I would've preferred a "classier" style.

The "3 in 1" claim (summer jacket ; 2-layer wet/cold jacket ; outer layer alone as gore-tex jacket) is YMMV. There's no question that the outer jacket by itself will do a decent job: if you stop somewhere along the way and want to go for a walk or just go around town doing your business, it will be comfortable, surely keep you gore-tex dry, and look fine. However it is not a replacement for a dedicated jacket you own for a specific sport; e.g. I have a $400 North Face jacket for hiking that looks way more elegant and is significantly more performant and comfortable. But that is not to criticise the Companero jacket but just to temper expectations: the mere fact that you can use the outer shell by itself as an acceptable will-keep-you-really-dry jacket/pant is quite amazing and certainly a bonus. Just don't expect that you'll take it backpacking, or that you will want to wear it into a restaurant on a date.

Finally, hip and coccyx protectors are sometimes dissed for being uncomfortable. At least in the Companero there is no discomfort at all. The armor is comfortable. You barely notice the hip and tailbone protectors. (If you reach down to put on your boots, the coccyx protector pushes in slightly, as if someone were cupping your ass ;-). It's really not unpleasant ;-).) I don't have any idea of how good they'd be in a crash. Back armor combined with coccyx armor really covers your entire spine up to the base of the neck. Elbow armor fits snugly. I wasn't sure of the positioning of the knee armor, but as I've said before, I probably need a slightly different size than the one I tried on.

A final remark: I don't know how easy it would be to address issues with these suits if any arise. At least I can just go to Touratech any day I feel like it, but for many of you that won't be practical. If any adjustments are necessary, I wouldn't be surprised if they have to send it back to Europe (I didn't ask).


Anyway, just some of my observations. Overall, I didn't notice anything of low quality, nor any oversights in the design. I think the basic design philosophy (summer jacket with full protection; gore-tex layer on the outside) is a very sensible design. Imo, it is always possible to add extra warmth to an outfit, but it is impossible to strip warmth away at some point since you can't take off your armor; the Companero design gives me the reassurance that I'll be okay in hot weather. For those of us who don't only ride on sundays and on country highways, and can't count on always moving at the speeds they enjoy, good ventilation is very important. I can always wear a warmer fleece or whatnot when it's cold.

Just as I bought a r1200gs because I can own only one vehicle and it needs to be good across the spectrum even if there's a bike to beat it in any single aspect, I want a suit that will keep me happy on a long north->south trip any time of the year. No doubt there are better suits for cold weather (rukka?); and probably suits that are better for pure protection (motoport? certain leather?) ; but I'm not convinced there's anything that covers quite the same range of applications.

To the inevitable question of whether this suit is worth the price ($2300 for jacket+pants), I have no answer. I imagine that similar crash protection can be purchased for about half the price; beyond that, the selling point of this outfit is really comfort, design, and temperature range. I can say that it seems well designed, well made, and unlikely to disappoint in any aspect of performance.




For what it's worth, I ride year-round in Seattle WA in all weather, and plan trips into the South; Mexico; perhaps even Central America. I'm 6-0 if you permit me to round up very slightly; 145-150lbs. So far, I have only owned crap gear. My shortlist for a long overdue upgrade :
Touratech Companero ($2300)
Motoport Kevlar (~ $1500)
Mid-range Rev-it, e.g. Sand (~ $1000)
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Old 04-24-2012, 12:16 AM   #105
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footnote:

At least two of the local Touratech employees here own a Companero suit. I'm sure they get a discount, but even so, it must be a serious investment for someone working as a salesperson. I just thought I'd mention that.
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