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Old 08-26-2014, 03:06 PM   #4576
gusanito
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'91 883

I picked this up from a friend last week. It had been sitting in his back yard under a tarp for the last couple of years rusting away. Every time I stopped by I looked under the tarp, shook my head and asked him what he was going to do with it.
I couldn't take seeing the bike deteriorate anymore, so, needing to restore/build something every couple of years, I made him an offer.

It's a '91 XLH with 34,800 miles on the clock. It DID run before he parked it.
It's a pig in a poke to me, hope for the best, expect the worst type of project.
Just what I was looking for.
Once I get it road worthy and make sure it's fine mechanically, I'll take the motor out and freshen up the frame. I still haven't made up my mind what I'm going to do with her, hell, I've even looked at trike kits.



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Old 08-26-2014, 04:54 PM   #4577
Old_Lion
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Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
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History of the Sportster

http://www.hotbikeweb.com/bikes/hist...ursuit-xlence?



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Old 08-27-2014, 07:49 PM   #4578
Squeaks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redclayrider View Post
That is too funny.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:12 PM   #4579
Randy
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Location: Newnan, GA USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger Beard View Post
According to my repair manual you have to remove the heads to change them out. Not that I'm against pulling heads as I have built plenty of engines but I have never had to pull anything other than cams to change a lifter in the past.


But check this out... I searched the net a bit and found a write up about clogged lifters on these bikes. It seems that due to low oil pressure that even small contaminates can get stuck in some of the bikes smaller bits like, say, I don't know? A hydraulic lifter perhaps? Anyway, the article suggests that an oil system cleaning with a product like Seafoam can sometimes unclog a lifter. Long story short, I poured half can of the shit into my oil and ran the piss out of it for about 15 minutes and viola, no more bleeding down lifter!!! Also found an exhaust leak that was exacerbating the noise and fixed that as well! She's back!!


Funny part is that it's going to save me a ton of money. Not because the lifters and gasket kit are very much money but because I had already started pricing out head work, cams and big bore kits!!
Yeah, I didn't look real hard, but my manual wasn't immediately clear about what was required prior to accessing the lifters. It was listed in the the top end tear down section, but I wasn't sure if it was ALL required just to get to the lifters....

The Seafoam thing was an awesome catch on your part. Glad it worked out to your advantage! I'll definitely keep that info in mind...

And hell, you're a dude, right? I mean, it's only logical that if you're tearing an engine down anyway... I mean, is there a red blooded gear head that would even consider NOT upgrading parts in the process? I THINK NOT! If you didn't at least CONSIDER it, and price everything out in detail... well... let's just say that your mancard credentials would be seriously suspect.....
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:41 AM   #4580
TheHeretic
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I joined the new to me Sportster owners club a few weeks ago.. I found a 1986 1100 Liberty edition with 5589 original miles. The bike started right up and ran great, took it for a test ride and negotiated the price down to $2250.00. It needed a serious cleaning but it is 100% original right down to the exhaust. Even though it ran very well, it was overflowing fuel out the carb vent so I rebuilt the carb and found the float was set way to high. Changed the oil and filter (I think it was still the original 1986 oil as well as primary oil. The tires were like petrified wood so spooned on 2 new tires, tubes and rim strips. replaced brake lines with braided steel, new drive chain. Rocker box gaskets were both leaking so I replaced with cometics. The old gaskets were brittle like thin pieces of glass. I'm having a good time just working on this bike...I really like the simplicity of this engine. The front end is pretty soft and would like to improve the rear shocks also...maybe Progressive units? (Any advice here would be appreciated) Other than that I plan on keeping her in original configuration and just ride it on Sunny days. Can't seem to get pictures to upload from work...will try from home when I get a chance.
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Old 08-29-2014, 07:22 PM   #4581
Randy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeretic View Post
I joined the new to me Sportster owners club a few weeks ago.. I found a 1986 1100 Liberty edition with 5589 original miles. The bike started right up and ran great, took it for a test ride and negotiated the price down to $2250.00. It needed a serious cleaning but it is 100% original right down to the exhaust. Even though it ran very well, it was overflowing fuel out the carb vent so I rebuilt the carb and found the float was set way to high. Changed the oil and filter (I think it was still the original 1986 oil as well as primary oil. The tires were like petrified wood so spooned on 2 new tires, tubes and rim strips. replaced brake lines with braided steel, new drive chain. Rocker box gaskets were both leaking so I replaced with cometics. The old gaskets were brittle like thin pieces of glass. I'm having a good time just working on this bike...I really like the simplicity of this engine. The front end is pretty soft and would like to improve the rear shocks also...maybe Progressive units? (Any advice here would be appreciated) Other than that I plan on keeping her in original configuration and just ride it on Sunny days. Can't seem to get pictures to upload from work...will try from home when I get a chance.
Ok...

Welcome to the club of the "enlightened".

But.... this post is worthless without pics!

In case you're not familiar, you'll need to upload your pics to a photo hosting site, such as photobucket, smugmug, et al. Once you've done that, you just post the link to your pic into the text of your post, and viola! The pic will appear in your post. There's a thread with specific, detailed instructions somewhere on this site... Check the "Ask Baldy, blame Fish (or whoever is named now)" subforum....
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Old 08-30-2014, 03:47 PM   #4582
FR700
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Joined: May 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vspeed View Post
Been kind of missing the 2003 XL 883 Standard I used to have so I brought home this 2001 883 Hugger today.



One owner, Just under 10,000 miles on the ODO, $3400.



That's a sweet looking ride

I just picked up a factory fresh '97, and the stock dual seat, torture rack, needs to go.

Question for you, is that the stock solo seat, or aftermarket ?


Thanks.



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Old 08-30-2014, 05:44 PM   #4583
vspeed
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Yeah it's a stock solo seat.
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Old 08-30-2014, 09:24 PM   #4584
FR700
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vspeed View Post
Yeah it's a stock solo seat.






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Old 08-31-2014, 05:43 PM   #4585
vspeed
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I've put about 400 miles on my new-to-me Sportster since I bought it last Monday. What a fantastic machine. The Sportster's engine torque and low center of gravity are perfect for the narrow country roads that wind through the hills around here on the edge of Appalachia.

A few more photos:

This is the 2003 XL883 Standard that I bought new in February 2003. I stupidly sold it a few years after I bought it. Of all the bikes I've ever owned and then sold, the Sportster was one of the ones I missed the most (right up there with my early Ducati M900).





My 2001 XL883 Hugger.



In my opinion the Sportster is one of the best looking motorcycles ever built. A classic beauty. This one will be parked on display in my living room over the winter.




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Old 08-31-2014, 07:44 PM   #4586
Chief Ten Bears
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How do you like the buckhorn bars? A hugger with straight/883r bars = perfection.


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Old 08-31-2014, 08:45 PM   #4587
vspeed
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They're ok I guess. They've kind of got a cool retro/chopper look and they're comfortable enough.

It may be a matter of preference, but I think the standard's straight bars are better for working through curvy roads. The buckhorns seem to put the rider in a more upright position than the standard bars, and they kind of force you to keep your elbows closer to your body. Neither of those things seem to help me when it comes to leaning into a corner.

Could just be that I've been riding big adventure touring bikes for so long now that I'm just used to having dirt bike type bars.

I pretty much just take it easy anyway though, so its ok.
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Old 09-09-2014, 08:57 PM   #4588
83XLX
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Thread bump with a pic of my Ironhead taken last weekend...

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Old 09-09-2014, 09:35 PM   #4589
KendallT
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Location: Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
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I'm super new to adventure bikes, but have always been a fan of Sportys. I immediately fell in love with the Nightster when they introduced it in 2007. I loved this bike, but it was horrible on my back. Any ride over 2 hours or so became less and less fun. The Street Glide shocks helped a lot, but she still had to go.
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Old 09-10-2014, 07:41 AM   #4590
Randy
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Location: Newnan, GA USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KendallT View Post
I'm super new to adventure bikes, but have always been a fan of Sportys. I immediately fell in love with the Nightster when they introduced it in 2007. I loved this bike, but it was horrible on my back. Any ride over 2 hours or so became less and less fun. The Street Glide shocks helped a lot, but she still had to go.
Yep. That's been discussed throughout this thread... Unfortunately, with the limited available travel of a lowered bike you will pay the price by sacrificing ride quality. Even with premium components there's just so much that can be done with a couple of inches of suspension travel. After many years of riding all sorts of bikes, new and old, and with varying levels of suspension sophistication, I was shocked at how poor the ride was on the newer factory lowered Sportsters. That was my first experience with HD, but the problem was easy to identify so I knew it could be corrected. To some degree at least...

My 48, in original form, was a torture rack on anything less than billiard table smooth asphalt...




But, after just a cheap and simple swap to the "normal" length factory shocks from a Roadster, the ride was transformed...



Now, these are still cheap, shitty shocks, but between them and my fork changes I'm actually pretty happy with the ride now.

I know that it could be better, and one day, when funds allow or when these shocks start to reach the end of their life, I'll upgrade to something of higher quality. But, for now I really can't complain. While I haven't really taken this bike on any extended trips yet, I have put 200 to 300 mile days on it. While it doesn't have a luxuriously smooth ride, it ain't bad either. I realize it'll never be able to compete with bikes of a more modern, long travel design. Then again, it isn't meant to be. I'd say it's about on par with a typical 80's era UJM standard, and probably a bit better than my '93 Duc, strictly in terms of compliance and the shocks transmitted to my spine. You still feel ripples in the road, and bigger sharp hits can be a little abrupt, but nothing really jars me, or pounds my spine and kidneys like it did before. It kinda has that old school feel of riding a decent older classic bike. Maybe like an old Norton or some such.... I just find it engaging and entertaining rather than painful or uncomfortable.

The other major benefit of the longer travel is the increased cornering clearance which allows the bike to be ridden a LOT more aggressively in the twisty bits. That relatively simple modification killed two birds with one stone, and fixed the two biggest shortcomings I found with my Sportster. While my GS is a fine machine, and I still enjoy it for what it is and does, I do find myself to have more fun aboard the Sportster now that I have it setup properly. My riding time has been limited lately, so when I do get a chance to get out for a few hours, I don't even have to consider which bike I want to take. Without question, the 48 is the one I can't wait to ride again.
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