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Old 02-25-2011, 07:12 PM   #91
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I was hoping someone would try to call me out on these not being black powder guns! Oh well.

My kids, will delete the photos after awhile...dont like advertising too much my stuff.

the rifle is a winchester 92 rifle





The .45 Colt was birthed in BP. You're in this thing, with your "identical twins". Good on you!

Sweet leather rigs. They look custom. Very, very nice!

I can't add anything more to what's been said over the past 135+ years, regarding Winchester's lever action, rifles.
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Old 02-25-2011, 07:20 PM   #92
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The .45 Colt was birthed in BP. You're in this thing, with your "identical twins". Good on you!

Sweet leather rigs. They look custom. Very, very nice!

I can't add anything more to what's been said over the past 135+ years, regarding Winchester's lever action, rifles.
Oh yeah, the winchester is chambered in .45. Not period correct, but handy to only have to load one round for them!
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Cavemen must've designed them shortly after inventing the wheel.
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Old 02-25-2011, 08:08 PM   #93
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Oh yeah, the winchester is chambered in .45. Not period correct, but handy to only have to load one round for them!
10-4! Would have been the .44-40, with the 1870's era Winchesters? I'm way out of my pay grade, here. Sorry!

The advantage of being able to shoot the same cartridges in the revolver, as well as the rifle (carbine), must have been a great advantage, which I can appreciate, for sure.
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:58 PM   #94
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But I also understand that the residue of spent shots is highly corrosive so you have to clean them thoroughly after each outing. I'm paranoid I'd miss an area and screw something up.
cap and ball revolvers are the only handguns we in britain are allowed now because we are such children with them apparently, the government have stopped all that for our own good. guess they figure a cap and ball wheelgun takes so long to reload nobody will try and holdup a bank with one, but they dont know about cylinder swaps obviously.

anyhoo, my mate simply shoots his at the club, goes home, takes the wooden grips off and dumps the pistol in a bucket of parrafin till he wants it again. zero corrosion and it cleans with a wipe after a couple of days.

in the good old days flintlocks furred up so bad the ball wouldnt go down the barrel, so you had to pee in there and slosh it back and forth with your finger over the muzzle, then you could shoot some more frenchmen
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Old 02-26-2011, 01:30 PM   #95
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cap and ball revolvers are the only handguns we in britain are allowed now because we are such children with them apparently, the government have stopped all that for our own good.

I didn't know that. I would like to expand on our govt and why we fight so hard against things like magazine capacity and how once a law is in place about guns it is impossible to overturn.

I won't. This thread is to cool to be thrown to CSM. I posted this book in the other gun thread but most are more in to modern guns. If you like guns and history check out this book. You're library may have it but it is worth owning.
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Old 02-27-2011, 01:27 AM   #96
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uberti, millenium edition cattleman in .45 of course

Can I post this in this thread? Have a pair of these!
did you convert the 1873 fom cap & ball to long colt or did it come that way,i'd like to change my pietta but it has an off center firing pin and there dosn't seem to be a kit
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Old 02-27-2011, 08:58 AM   #97
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did you convert the 1873 fom cap & ball to long colt or did it come that way,i'd like to change my pietta but it has an off center firing pin and there dosn't seem to be a kit
These uberti, millennium edition cattleman models all came as cartridge pistols.

Actually, I have never seen one like yours. What I do know is that most of the conversion kits are in the $300 range. For that price I would never buy a conversion and would instead spend the cash on a good condition used weapon in what I wanted. Almost like a matched pair. The ubertis I posted were not really that expensive if you buy used (in good condition).
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Cavemen must've designed them shortly after inventing the wheel.
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:13 PM   #98
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i did it again,this time i came home with a colt dragoon 3rd model 1848 .44 cal.,it seems these pistols were so heavy the holster was mounted on the saddle not the soldier.
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duckman screwed with this post 02-27-2011 at 03:28 PM
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:27 PM   #99
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Yee haw! That's a hand cannon! What's next, duckman, a 105 mm Howitzer?

We need a firing report on that bad boy. Get to the range...NOW!
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Old 02-27-2011, 04:24 PM   #100
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i did it again,this time i came home with a colt dragoon 3rd model 1848 .44 cal.,it seems these pistols were so heavy the holster was mounted on the saddle not the soldier.
I read somewhere that the walker colt/dragoon series was created due to problems they mounted infantry was having. With regular pistols they would shoot at the indians (who would sling down on their horses), then ride off, get on another horse and come back again. The idea was to be able to stop a horse on the spot. BUT this is not why they were called horse pistols. Its because like you said, they were so heavy and large they could not be practically worn on the hip. The amount of powder these were designed for was almost equivalent to that of a rifle and they were the most powerful revolver/modern handgun until the .44 of dirty harry fame!

(one of those was my first black powder pistol!)

Lets just say they go baBOOM when you fire them!
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loner, lonegunman, get it. That’s the whole point. I like the lifestyle, the image. Look a the way I dress.
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Cavemen must've designed them shortly after inventing the wheel.
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Old 02-27-2011, 07:38 PM   #101
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1858 Remington .44 vs. 1860 Colt .44

Well, I received my 1860 Colt .44 from Cabela's this past week! It's the steel framed model that was on sale for $199.99. I've been wanting one of these for quite some time now and decided to "pull the trigger", and buy one. I wanted a companion to my 1858 Remington .44. I believe these two revolvers represent the "state of the art", in cap and ball revolvers of the Civil War era (and for a period thereafter), until the advent of the self-contained, brass cased, cartridge type firearms (of which I own many)!

My purpose in posting is to provide you (mainly, you folks that are new to black powder, or considering it), with my impressions of both of these firearms. I went to the range today and compared them to each other. I'm sure this is the first time in history this has been done!

These are both replica firearms manufactured in Italy by F. LLI. PIETTA.

Triggers: The Colt has the better trigger, IMO. Less creep. The Remington isn't far behind, but the Colt is definitely better. No question.

Ergonomics: The Colt's trigger guard is a little on the small side, for me. I'm an average sized guy, with average sized fingers and I felt the Remington was much better in this regard.

Overall feel in the hand, balance and grip configuration was better on the Colt. The Colt seemed to be a more comfortable reach to the hammer for cocking. It felt more natural to me. They are very close, however, and I'm probably splitting hairs on this one. The Remington feels heavier, though I have not actually weighed either.

Mechanical operation: Both are relatively smooth, but neither is even in the same universe as my worked up, modern Smith and Wesson swing out cylinder guns (as would be expected ). These designs are 150 years old, yet viable arms and deadly in every sense of the word.

The Remington has a cylinder that can be easily removed from the frame, where the Colt requires that a wedge be drifted out to separate the barrel from the frame. The advantage goes to the Remington, here.

As a post script, I'm going to tear into each of these and do some stoning and honing in the future, (to improve the actions), but that's another topic!

I am in love with the Colt's hammer cocking/cylinder indexing mechanism, as compared to the Remington's. The Remington's feels heavier and much less sophisticated and smooth. There are five "clicks", that are identifiable when slow cocking the Colt (you have to listen carefully), and two when cocking the Remington. Both are confidence inspiring, but the Colt system is one I took to instantly. Just a real mechanical, precision thing. Hard to describe. You'll just have to try them both and decide.

Both are straight forward in regards to loading, though the Colt has a larger frame cut out for capping, which I found easier to use.

Accuracy: This is the least important part of this post, as I have had a reasonable degree of experience with the Remington and this was the first time out for the Colt. Having said that, I believe the sights on the Remington to be superior to those of the Colt. The Remington features a groove cut in the top strap (which the Colt does not have), and a nice, tall front post. This makes it very easy to obtain a good sight picture. The Colt uses a notch cut into the hammer where at a fully cocked position, the blade front sight is visible for alignment. The front blade on the Colt is low profile and somewhat more difficult to acquire a sight picture for precision shooting as compared to the Remington. The Colt does not provide the "tunnel", sight effect of the Remington. The sights on the Colt (using a Navy hold), at 18 yds., provided an impact point that was high by 4". The front needs to be built up a bit! Also, the Colt has a brass front blade. I prefer blackened steel here.

Considering the fact of my limited experience with the Colt, I would be hard pressed to say that I would ever be able to shoot the Colt in a more precision fashion than the Remington. The Remington is superior, IMO.

I can blow a single, ragged, 5 shot hole in a target at 50 ft. (standing w/ two handed hold), with the Remington. I wasn't able to do that with the Colt.

Having said that, if I were a cavalryman, in the heat of battle, during the Civil War (for example), this kind of accuracy would be next to nothing in value, in CQC.

Conclusion: I love them both, each for their "give and take", advantages over the other. The Colt is sleek, smooth and well balanced, the Remington is robust, heavy duty and very accurate. Both have their "warts", but I can say that either would be a great choice for anyone looking to get into a cap and ball revolver.

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Old 03-03-2011, 04:07 AM   #102
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Here's a recent acquisition. It's not really a black-powder gun, in fact the owners-manual advises against using it for BP shooting as it claims the tolerances of the replicas are tighter than the originals and that fouling can become rapidly problematic, but is a replica of one from that era. 1875 Schofield by A. Uberti, chambered in 45 Colt rather than the original 45 Schofield. I like the touches of case-hardening on the trigger guard and latch.









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Old 03-03-2011, 10:24 AM   #103
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Old 03-03-2011, 10:31 AM   #104
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Man just looking at that schofield makes me want to got out and rob a train or something.
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Old 03-03-2011, 10:36 AM   #105
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If you should hear of any trains being robbed in NW Montana, rest assured that it was not me!
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