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Old 01-09-2012, 08:31 AM   #196
dvgonzo
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Cliff h.
Yeah I seem to remember when I broke the tank on my old TT600 after it was about 12 years old by barely dinging it against that small tree it cost me 300 bucks for an aftermarket one. I could have at the time still gotten a stock new one but they were an additional 150! MAN! Talk about them paying for the tank mold every time they sell a tank...OUCH! But if you HAVE to have it........

MR.BW,
I was a little apprenensive about putting the light together as I am a machinist and me and electrical components do not get along to well. It was real easy. Has a couple things to watch out for in that you use that epoxy in a couple spots and do not have but about 5 minutes to get things right before it hardens up. And there are two little wires that need to be soldered and you have to be careful to not put a bunch of heat into the assembly or it can get cooked (That was the one that worried me but went well once I did it.)

The kit light puts out around 700 lumens and is spread out real nice for night dirt trail riding. They offer different drivers for it which bump the lumens up to just over 1000 but also increase the heat output. The one I already built in a side by side comparrison with the stock model is about a third again brighter! A REAL noticeable differance! The whole thing is about 2 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. (The actual LED is only 3/4's of an inch in diameter and about 1/8 inch thick!) I need to get started on that project as I want to build about 5-6 more for various scooters. I also built a couple mini ram type ball mounts as I do not like the commercially available ones as they are so big and bulky.

I did look into some ready to use LED lights but they were from about 150 to 250 apiece! I guess THAT is why I went with the do it yorself ones.

I too have noticed you cannot believe much in print from Hong Kong...anything is legal if it helps them sell a few more parts!

Like I mentioned both my BW's are pretty much shed queens. I always seem to ride the blue bikes when headed out to the hills. I would be surprised if they have 1000 miles between them so have not had to worry about even adjusting that eccentric chain adjuster.

If I ever need to, I can build extras due to my background. I would imagine they are just made out of oilight (A bushing material the Japanese tend to use quite a bit, but it is pretty soft and due to it's nature tends to wear pretty quickly). If the material was changed to a good quality bearing bronze I bet they would last a LOT longer.

Would you happen to have a drawing/print of the bushings? I should probably try to get some dimensions for them so I am ready just in case.

matt556.

NICE before and after mud washing pics! I wish we had more river/stream crossings down here in the desert...Then I could be more like Mr.BW and I would not have to wash my dirt scoots near as much.
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:42 AM   #197
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You know I been meaning to ask. Does it seem hard to you guys to wheelie the BW's? I know the 350 has enough hit and can get it up but it always seems to come down fast and hard from a wheelie....and sort of seems to track slightly to the left (I think) when in one.

I think it probably has something to do with the jackshaft.

I am pretty good at doing wheelies but have always thought the BW's felt "weird" once the front wheel was airborn? MAybe due to the size tire?......Maybe it is just me??
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:37 AM   #198
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I think the weird part of a BW wheelie has to do with the soft mushy tire.Try making the tire hard and see how it feels. A dirt bike tire does not flex like the ATV tire on the BW.
Just my .02 cents....
When I built the TT500 bigwheel I had a really "firm" tire and it wheelied really well. The wheelbase was longer due to the jackshaft so it was hard to get up in the air.
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Old 01-10-2012, 05:00 PM   #199
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Part's

More part's came in today ! I'm gett'n excited , almost have everything to get the job started !
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Old 01-10-2012, 08:15 PM   #200
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Have you owned or ridden a Bigwheel before?
Most fun I ever had was trying to be like Kenny Roberts and flat tracking my BW200 in a big snow oval. I crashed more times than I can remember but man it was fun!!!
Get busy so you can try it out!!!
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Old 01-10-2012, 09:37 PM   #201
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dvgonzo,

I don't have any drawings of the eccentric bushings, but my six year old is pretty handy with that stuff. I do have a spare set of bushings that I could send you to mic and take specs and do all of that cool stuff.

Then you could make reproductions of them and retire to a small private island in the South Pacific from the proceeds of selling them to desperate BigWheelers.

Shercoman,

I was thinking about your spacer idea for the rear hub. The only problem I see with the spacer is the limitation of the length of the stock studs on the rear axle. I'm sure you have a brilliant solution and we only expect excellence referencing your previous works. So, how's it coming along?

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Old 01-11-2012, 06:21 AM   #202
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The rain is here and that means more mud. I took the big wheel up a steep tight trail that had a bunch of loose dirt when it was dry. I wouldn't even try my other dirt bikes there. Even with the mud the big wheel went right up. The mud actually provided better traction than the loose dirt for the big wheel tire. I tried this trail twice with the fat cat and it failed to make it up without a lot of help. It's steeper than it looks before the arrow and you have to turn around a stump and some brush. I think it's an advantage for the big wheel not to wheelie to easy. I can use the front tire to steer and if the rear tire starts to spin, I can sit back with out fear of the bike flipping over on something steep. I have brought the front wheel up on some hills but it real controllable.
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Old 01-11-2012, 06:32 AM   #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shercoman View Post
I think the weird part of a BW wheelie has to do with the soft mushy tire.Try making the tire hard and see how it feels. A dirt bike tire does not flex like the ATV tire on the BW.
Just my .02 cents....
When I built the TT500 bigwheel I had a really "firm" tire and it wheelied really well. The wheelbase was longer due to the jackshaft so it was hard to get up in the air.
If you find a picture of your TT500 bigwheel I really want to see it. Those TT500 motors were a work of art and tons of good low end power.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:04 PM   #204
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Quote:
Shercoman,

I was thinking about your spacer idea for the rear hub. The only problem I see with the spacer is the limitation of the length of the stock studs on the rear axle. I'm sure you have a brilliant solution and we only expect excellence referencing your previous works. So, how's it coming along?

Regards,
Mr. Bigwheel


The spacer will be as thick as the difference between the new wheel (presumedly offset as is common) and the centered wheel of the BW hub.
This thickness would allow the nuts on the original studs to fit down inside counterbores in the aluminum adapter.
Then new studs would be placed in their own counterbored holes to bolt the new wheel.
I have not done anything on this yet.
I had asked for your expertise on wheel selection to allow for a wider selection of tires. I'm thinking that going to a 12 inch diameter rim would allow for a wider selection of tires.
Your thoughts?

And a question for you:
I bought a Tri-Z front hub and brake disc. I was outbid for a set of Tri Z forks.
Will this hub fit the stock fork spacing?
Will it fit the stock rim bolt pattern?
Can you give me a measurement from the centerline of the front axle up to the top of the triple clamps with your Tri Z forks? I'm wondering how much taller it is.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:06 PM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudmantra View Post
If you find a picture of your TT500 bigwheel I really want to see it. Those TT500 motors were a work of art and tons of good low end power.
I'm looking.....
I used to keep a notebook with pics of my projects but have moved several times and......sigh....things get lost.
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:00 PM   #206
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OK,the cool thing is that I found the pictures of the BW500.
Now I'm trying to figure out how to import them.
They are old glossy photographs so any suggestions are appreciated.

Shercoman screwed with this post 01-11-2012 at 08:10 PM
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:46 PM   #207
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Took pictures of pictures.
Not the best quality but you can get the idea.
Seat cover was replaced after this was taken.
Click this link for the rest of the pictures.

http://s922.photobucket.com/albums/a...an_2010/BW500/



Shercoman screwed with this post 01-12-2012 at 03:46 PM
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:29 AM   #208
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Shercoman,

My measurement of the '86 forks from axle center to the top of the fork tube is 33 1/2". This is with a tape measure, so the axle center is an approximation. I think that the '85 forks would be relatively close in length. This was taken with the bike on a stand and the forks at full extension.

The hub will fit the BW rim. I use BW and Tri-Z rims interchangeably.

I'm not sure if the Tri-Z hub will fit with the BW triple's spacing. However, since the hub is positioned with a steel tube spacer on one side, it might be possible to adjust it's length to your requirements. If you are thinking of putting the disc brake setup on the stock forks, I think that using a TW200 left fork tube would be a viable option. The early TW200s shared the BW's 33mm fork legs and had a drum brake. Later versions have a caliper mount on the left tube and would probably not take too much fiddling to get things to work since they will fit into the stock BW triple clamp.

My thoughts about the rear rim have been towards using a 10" rim. There seems to be a good selection of rubber in that size (at least compared to the 9") and I think that I would allow a more rounded profile in cross-section since it allows for a taller tire. That is a valid theory, but no more than that. My searches for tires usually center around ones that can be studded, so that is probably not a consideration for everyone. I look for rear tires with tall, meaty paddles, whereas, I think you would probably be better served by a tire with a more traditional knobby pattern for your terrain.

Regards,

Mr. BigWheel
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Old 01-12-2012, 06:29 PM   #209
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BTW, the TT500BW is awesome.

Is that an eccentric that the jackshaft is mounted in?
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Old 01-12-2012, 07:09 PM   #210
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Thanks.
I have always kicked myself for selling that one.

Yes.The Yamahas use needle roller bearings on the jackshaft. Smaller but not as robust as larger ball bearings.
The bearings were pressed into an machined aluminum part that was off center enough to allow a one chain link adjustment.
You loosened the bolts at the top and used a special spanner wrench to turn it. Once the front chain was adjusted,you adjusted the back one.

Do you already have a 10 inch rim you want to use for the back?
I would need to know the bolt pattern and backspacing to design an adapter.
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