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Old 02-13-2011, 04:14 PM   #31
Spinalcracker
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I have used the instant mixes for backpacking and motorcycle travel from MaryJanes Farm.

http://shop.maryjanesfarm.org/store/...nt&submit=true

I order the "outpost" size which is more than enough for one.

A lot of flavor, organic and much less sodium than regular freeze dried foods.
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Old 02-14-2011, 05:11 PM   #32
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Tortillas, vegetables, cheese and salsa can be used to create wonderful healthy roadside meals hot or cold. You can warm them in a pan. Add fresh onion and peppers, cheese, and salsa. Add canned chicken, or other meats from a deli. PAck easy and last for days un-refridgerated.

Other than that its usually Poutine and Spam.
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Old 02-14-2011, 05:13 PM   #33
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I almost forgot. Potatoes, eggs and bacon in a Tortilla are a great breakfast.

Its food you can eat with your hands. no utensils to clean up.
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Old 02-14-2011, 05:16 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by dakardad View Post
Ok, I made a comment on a travel thread to our friend Questor on what crap we tend to eat when on the road. Others chimed in and agreed that we all felt better and had more fun when we stopped eating that greasy roadside shit.
This is the thread for moto cuisine. No GORP or single pot 'dont look, just eat' ideas. How to eat healthy on the road. Recipies and ideas.
Ready, GO.
Great idea for a thread....my wife is a vegan, and eating while out on the road is always challenging-finding food that is nutritious, healthy, and not full of sugar, animal protein, and other empty calories is not easy!

Cheers,
Steve
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Old 02-15-2011, 11:08 AM   #35
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When I pile the miles, say 500+ a day, I eat very light. Every gas stop eat a Clif's bar, or have an Ensure protein drink, and keep water close at hand throughout the trip. You'll never get hungry and you'll never be too full (sleepy is bad at speed).
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:45 PM   #36
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A fresh caught trout, cattail with a hint of ramp. A salad of young dandelion, greenbrier shoots, and purslane. Come on, you are going to deny yourself the starch?
He didn't say avoid starch he said white carbs. He's right whole grains are healthy, processed white stuff isn't.
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Old 02-17-2011, 03:47 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triplenickel View Post
He didn't say avoid starch he said white carbs. He's right whole grains are healthy, processed white stuff isn't.
And I might have taken things too literal. I quote an excerpt from Livestrong:


"Starchy Fruits Vegetables

Starchy white carbs come primarily from root vegetables like potatoes and carrots. According to Nutrition Data, the average potato has approximately 63 grams of carbohydrates. Most low-carb plans only allow around 20 grams per day in the form of green, leafy vegetables. Starchy white carbs also exist in fruits. For example, bananas are about 93 percent carbohydrate. A medium banana contains 27 grams"
.

I would wholeheartedly agree if the statement was only "processed white stuff", but I ain't gonna give up my potatoes.

You can read a little more about where I'm coming from here.
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Old 02-17-2011, 12:43 PM   #38
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Fair enough I see where you're coming from, I'm from the whole foods are fine school of thought too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by intothenew View Post
And I might have taken things too literal. I quote an excerpt from Livestrong:


"Starchy Fruits Vegetables

Starchy white carbs come primarily from root vegetables like potatoes and carrots. According to Nutrition Data, the average potato has approximately 63 grams of carbohydrates. Most low-carb plans only allow around 20 grams per day in the form of green, leafy vegetables. Starchy white carbs also exist in fruits. For example, bananas are about 93 percent carbohydrate. A medium banana contains 27 grams".

I would wholeheartedly agree if the statement was only "processed white stuff", but I ain't gonna give up my potatoes.

You can read a little more about where I'm coming from here.
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Old 02-20-2011, 03:32 AM   #39
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Chicken Noodle Soup

I offer this one as a template. It can be simple and controversial, it can be complex and purest. I prefer the middle when on the road. Only one pot, but it's OK to look at.



We carry:

Olive oil
Black Pepper
Basil
Seasoned salt
Chicken cube


We need to pick up:

Can of chicken
Noodles
Veggies


Onions are a must, and the green pepper was the only other thing I could muster. Celery doesn't travel well and has to be purchased by the bunch, too much. A small bag of baby carrots might have been nice. A few mushrooms would have really been nice, but Martha will not participate if those are included.

Cut that pepper in half and store in a green bag. It will travel well for a day or two in a soft pack.



Dice one pepper half, and thin slice the white of the onions.



Add a little olive oil to the pot, and let's flash the onion and pepper.



After just a couple of minutes, add that can of chicken.



And three of these.



Controversial, but one of these. I'll offer an alternative in a moment. Basil, seasoned salt, and black pepper are also added.



We need to bring it to a boil, and have a sip or two.



Put that fancy shmancy cut on the onion greens when you get a chance.



When things come to a boil, add the noodles and follow their directions.



Garnish with the onion greens.



10 minutes to prepare, about 20 to cook. Clean up looks like this, although in the bush those two bowls would be missing and another canteen cup would get used.




I realize that sodium and MSG could be points of contention on this one. I am just under a third of RDV in sodium, if you behave with the seasoned salt. You can get that down a bit by using one can of lite chicken broth, instead of the cube. I prefer to carry a few cubes. If MSG is an issue, then the lite chicken broth is a must.

I doubt that I have ever made this the same way twice. But, I have learned to at least include the olive oil. Whether you saute anything or not, the olive oil will keep it hot longer, the sheen on top acts as an insulator.

This is a nice one after a full day of rain and fog, it'll warm your bones.
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Old 02-20-2011, 12:27 PM   #40
triplenickel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by intothenew View Post
I offer this one as a template. It can be simple and controversial, it can be complex and purest. I prefer the middle when on the road. Only one pot, but it's OK to look at.



We carry:

Olive oil
Black Pepper
Basil
Seasoned salt
Chicken cube


We need to pick up:

Can of chicken
Noodles
Veggies


Onions are a must, and the green pepper was the only other thing I could muster. Celery doesn't travel well and has to be purchased by the bunch, too much. A small bag of baby carrots might have been nice. A few mushrooms would have really been nice, but Martha will not participate if those are included.

Cut that pepper in half and store in a green bag. It will travel well for a day or two in a soft pack.



Dice one pepper half, and thin slice the white of the onions.



Add a little olive oil to the pot, and let's flash the onion and pepper.



After just a couple of minutes, add that can of chicken.



And three of these.



Controversial, but one of these. I'll offer an alternative in a moment. Basil, seasoned salt, and black pepper are also added.



We need to bring it to a boil, and have a sip or two.



Put that fancy shmancy cut on the onion greens when you get a chance.



When things come to a boil, add the noodles and follow their directions.



Garnish with the onion greens.



10 minutes to prepare, about 20 to cook. Clean up looks like this, although in the bush those two bowls would be missing and another canteen cup would get used.




I realize that sodium and MSG could be points of contention on this one. I am just under a third of RDV in sodium, if you behave with the seasoned salt. You can get that down a bit by using one can of lite chicken broth, instead of the cube. I prefer to carry a few cubes. If MSG is an issue, then the lite chicken broth is a must.

I doubt that I have ever made this the same way twice. But, I have learned to at least include the olive oil. Whether you saute anything or not, the olive oil will keep it hot longer, the sheen on top acts as an insulator.

This is a nice one after a full day of rain and fog, it'll warm your bones.
I like it simple and cheap, You could substitue some whole grain cous cous too. Try for a red, yellow, or orange pepper and presentation will go way up (plus red's have like 3x the vitamin c).
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Old 02-20-2011, 12:55 PM   #41
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We can go places where you would have to travel 1000k just to get within 500k of a Subway. Even roadhouses can be two or three days riding if you're not goiing into really deserted territory.

If one only ate at restaurants (even high end) you would end up with scurvey. You would also quickly find out that your diet had insufficient fibre.

Buy a dehydrator, all fruits and vegies can be dried and reconstituted, herbs and spice can be carried in little ziplock bags, sauces like bolognase or chili, same deal. It's a simple thing, as long as you bought enough water, to make a similar meal as you have at home.

Make you're own Cliff bars, easy as energy during the day, as well as breakfast for me. I aslo carry a couple of whole hiking meals which have a long shelf life and if you add a small tin of tuna and some hot sauce are more thna edible.

Supplement with roadhouse sit-down plated meals where-ever possible and buy a styrofoam tray of frozen meat otherwise. By the time you get to wherever you're camping it's defrosted. The other things generally available where it's really remote include dehydrated mashed potato and peas and corn.
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Old 04-03-2011, 10:18 PM   #42
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Tenderloin and Shrimp for the campground

A good, fairly easy campground feast when you happen to be near a food store with a good butcher and fresh(or frozen in a pinch) shrimp... such as:

This meal is not suggested for any person who would cook tenderloin steak past medium rare...

Picked up aluminum pie pans to cook with, tenderloin steaks from a superb butcher, fresh shrimp, butter, obay seafood seasoning, a little garlic powder,bacon, portabella mushrooms, an onion, and baked beans.

One crew member carried the cooking grate, steaks were bacon wrapped(pinned with a toothpick section that HAS to be removed before eating!) and each item was cooked over the open fire in it's own pie plate. Shrimp sauteed in butter with obay and garlic powder, beans warmed up in the open can along side the fire pit. Extra pie plates can be crimped over the top of the bottom one for an 'oven' effect, and to protect from an 'ashy' fire. Assuming each person carry's a mess kit... dinner is served.





Cooking this for a very deserving group of fellow riders, co-conspirators, and friends makes for a really good, and easy to clean up feast!
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Old 04-06-2011, 04:25 PM   #43
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I'm a big fan of various grains. My spouse and I are are both vegetarian so feel free to substitute in meat where you see fit.

Measure out 1 cup bags of rice, couscous, quinoa, etc... (Easy to store on the bike and don't take up much room)
Make or use pre-made spice packets or boolean cubes (I prefer sea salt veggie broth ones)
Find fresh veggies along the way via farm stands or super markets.
Find some additional optional things to base the meal around. e.g. tempeh, meat, whatever.

My favorite method is to cut the top off a bell pepper and put all the ingredients (grains, chopped veggies) in it and wrap it in foil and cook that.

This is basically what I eat on a normal day at home so its not a big change for me on the road aside from a little planning ahead.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:19 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosscoact View Post
Buy a dehydrator, all fruits and vegies can be dried and reconstituted, herbs and spice can be carried in little ziplock bags, sauces like bolognase or chili, same deal. It's a simple thing, as long as you bought enough water, to make a similar meal as you have at home.

Make you're own Cliff bars, easy as energy during the day, as well as breakfast for me. I aslo carry a couple of whole hiking meals which have a long shelf life and if you add a small tin of tuna and some hot sauce are more thna edible.

Supplement with roadhouse sit-down plated meals where-ever possible and buy a styrofoam tray of frozen meat otherwise. By the time you get to wherever you're camping it's defrosted. The other things generally available where it's really remote include dehydrated mashed potato and peas and corn.
Dehydrators are great! I just made a dozen pancakes in the dehydrator that uses ground nuts for "flour," (great source of protein which I need when I'm riding), bananas, apples and a pinch of nutmet for flavor. These things are great - even plain! I throw them in a baggie, and 'voila.

For the first lunch I just carry a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, and it saves travel time. After that, fruit, dehydrated snacks and meals - which are cheap when you dehydrate them yourself, sandwich materials, lots of water, and the occassional roadhouse meal is fine.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:51 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarFleet View Post
I'm a big fan of various grains. My spouse and I are are both vegetarian so feel free to substitute in meat where you see fit.

Measure out 1 cup bags of rice, couscous, quinoa, etc... (Easy to store on the bike and don't take up much room)
Make or use pre-made spice packets or boolean cubes (I prefer sea salt veggie broth ones)
Find fresh veggies along the way via farm stands or super markets.
Find some additional optional things to base the meal around. e.g. tempeh, meat, whatever.

My favorite method is to cut the top off a bell pepper and put all the ingredients (grains, chopped veggies) in it and wrap it in foil and cook that.

This is basically what I eat on a normal day at home so its not a big change for me on the road aside from a little planning ahead.
OH Excellent!!! I havent done that in awhile. I like some finely chopped lamb in mine with garlic, rice or barley. Slow cook in foil make the filling a bit wet.
easy to get stuff like this along the way. No real cleanup either.
I like big steaks with bacon too, they just make me feel like shit for the rest of the next day. I dont take that kind of loss anymore.
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