ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-13-2011, 02:50 PM   #46
KingRat
Stroppy.
 
KingRat's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: a citizen of the world
Oddometer: 25,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by davsato View Post
and what the hell is biscuits and gravy?
think plain scones in a bechamel sauce made with bacon or sausage fat; may or may not come with the cooked meat that provided the fat.

Anyone who compares bubble and squeak [with bacon added, and a fried egg on top] unfavourably with 'biscuits and gravy' is in urgent need of medical evaluation.



Don't listen to Americans who think that the rest of the world eats crap.

This is how to make breakfast:



And you won't find these on sale in the UK :

__________________
.
.

"Discourage self-help, and loyal subjects become the slaves of ruffians." - A. V. Dicey
"The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools." - Herbert Spencer
"Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people's money." - Margaret Thatcher
KingRat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 03:00 PM   #47
Jäger
Osons
 
Jäger's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: NW MT/SE BC
Oddometer: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Monkey View Post

I would be interested in any recipes variations you may have for the Bannock.
Well bannock back in the sticks around here is about as ubiquitous as Mountain Money in camp, and I doubt any two people make it exactly the same way.

The general concept is a cup of some kind of flour to a cup of water, with a couple of teaspoons of baking powder, and a pinch of salt to taste. A bit of butter, lard, or oil and you're good to go. Multiply those portions by the desired amount of dry mix, stick it in your ziplock bag, and you're done. The old bushrats probably used lard or fat off some critter because they wouldn't have had butter, margarine, or oil. Ditto for the milk powder, although I imagine early ranchers setting up on the homestead had a milk cow kicking around somewhere. At home, with milk, lard instead of oil, and basted with butter while cooking... well, it's pretty good grub when cooked in the kitchen as well.

The measurements aren't too critical - how much stuff do you make at home that you do just by feel these days? And this is something you can make at home with minimal investment in the experiment if it goes wrong, until you find a combination you like. You'll be out a half cup or cup of flour, a little bit of baking powder, salt, oil, and seasonings, and about 20 minutes or so of your time. The dog will probably eat it if you don't like it...

I like caraway seeds in the mix, rosemary is pretty good, so is Italian seasoning, as is a bit of finely grated Parmesan, Asiago, etc. Tastes like something with a fancy name that you'd buy in a bakery and they'd charge you $3/apiece for... My wife nags the crap out of me unless I put Saskatoons, or huckleberries, or wild strawberries in hers, if there's any to be found in the vicinity of camp, so you can go that route as well.

There's probably about a thousand bannock recipes on the internet, and it isn't unlike Irish soda bread, or baking powder biscuits, so there's probably another thousand. The hardest part is deciding to just try it at home a few different ways before heading out in the sticks.

And if you REALLY want to cheat... Bisquick is your friend... and it ain't half bad either, done exactly the same way,
Jäger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 05:51 PM   #48
DougZ73
Fading off.........
 
DougZ73's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: NJ
Oddometer: 6,827
Tried the MH Spaghetti and Meat Sauce today. I would rate it a 2.5 on a scale of 0-5, 5 being best and 0 being worst. It was not great, but also not too bad. I can see myself taking at least one and eating it while camping.
__________________
Skyline Drive 11/2010 , Catskills 2010 trip, Catskills 2011 , Southern TNJT, 2011
DougZ's MTB thread , DZ Moto Photo Bloggin' , (my) Learning photography thread, DougZ vids
- Ryder Joseph Z. , Born 11/26/12-- the next Adventure: Grayson Hunter Z., born 5/3/14
DougZ73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 10:06 PM   #49
SgtDuster
Beastly Adventurer
 
SgtDuster's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Oddometer: 3,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingRat View Post
And you won't find these on sale in the UK :

Hmmmm...pork brain!




Doh!
__________________
2010 Buell Ulysses
1984 Suzuki GR650 "Tempter"
SgtDuster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 11:30 PM   #50
4eyes
Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Oddometer: 89
Thumb Take a few extra minutes

Freeze dried stuff is ok, but I like to take a few extra minutes (and a little more fuel) and cook my own.

Quaker Oats instant oatmeal in single serve packs.

Folgers coffee singles, this is my new favorite. Coffee in a tea-bag, vacume-packed in a single serve pouch. Good for two PERFECT cups of coffee, while the rest of the family drinks tea or hot chocolate.

Zateran's Red Beans and Rice.

Chicken-of- the-sea, sells tuna, and chicken in foil packs. Perfect for adding a little protein to some pasta.

Speaking of pasta, buy in bulk and use ziplock bags to pack in serving size. Works for rice too, or just buy Uncle Ben's and save a couple of minutes.

Any of the various brands of "pasta sides" that are foil packed with seasoning, try Knorr Alfredo Broccoli with a pouch of the afore-mentioned chicken.

Ramen noodles, make mine Indo Mie.
4eyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 11:48 AM   #51
davsato
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: southern England
Oddometer: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingRat View Post
And you won't find these on sale in the UK :

no.......no way...... 1000% RDA cholesterol? is that even legal? theres only 5.5oz of it! jeez

cheers kingrat, up the full english!
but maybe not this one from mario's cafe, thats just daft......
Attached Images
 
__________________
Dave

davsato screwed with this post 02-14-2011 at 11:59 AM
davsato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 11:55 AM   #52
davsato
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: southern England
Oddometer: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jäger View Post
Well bannock back in the sticks around here is about as ubiquitous as Mountain Money in camp, and I doubt any two people make it exactly the same way...............

...............And if you REALLY want to cheat... Bisquick is your friend... and it ain't half bad either, done exactly the same way,
that sounds really easy jager, and nice, i'll give it a go. it sounds vaguely like something we used to make when i was a little kid, used to make up a dough and wrap it round a stick and cook it over the campfire, could you do that with yours?
__________________
Dave
davsato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 01:08 PM   #53
Jäger
Osons
 
Jäger's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: NW MT/SE BC
Oddometer: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by davsato View Post
no.......no way...... 1000% RDA cholesterol? is that even legal? theres only 5.5oz of it! jeez

cheers kingrat, up the full english!
When you get past the selective cherrypicking that went with the posting of that picture, at the originating web page you'll find that this immediately followed the picture:
"Which brings me back to the canned pork brains. Sadly(?), Armour no longer makes the product because the overall demand for it was so slight (shocking, I know)."

Herein lies an essential difference, and why Brit troops have earned their well deserved nickname. While pork brains in milk gravy can be found some places in America, there is so little demand for them that Armour stopped trying to market them. So it's not exactly an established dish in the "weird" US. On the other hand, Spotted Dick, black sausage, faggots and mushy peas, etc are not hard at all to find on menus in merry old England. Do we see those disappearing soon from English menus and grocery stores? Not likely.

But, we digress...

Quote:
Originally Posted by davsato View Post
that sounds really easy jager, and nice, i'll give it a go. it sounds vaguely like something we used to make when i was a little kid, used to make up a dough and wrap it round a stick and cook it over the campfire, could you do that with yours?
Are you talking about the Bisquick shortcut or pre-mixing the dry ingredients? I haven't tried the Bisquick thing, not out of snobbery but because there's no Bisquick in the house and mixing your own flour, baking powder, and salt is easy enough.

However, we cook bannock wrapped around a stick when hoofing it/biking, and in a cast iron frying pan when in a hard camp (don't carry cast iron cookery when on foot or bike). I expect Bisquick is no different.

I'm sure Bisquick is fine, but as most people already have flour, baking powder, and salt in their house... why bother?

A quick Google thing shows numerous recipes for Bisquick bannock, so it obviously isn't a novel idea. Here's just one, except done in a frying pan instead of on a stick going light:

Bisquick Bannock:
1 cup Bisquick buttermilk baking mix
6-8 tablespoons water
3 Tablespoons oil or margarine

At home: Package the baking mix in a large, tough plastic bag.
In the field: Put a 3-4 Tbs. oil or margarine into the bag, and slowly add enough water to give the mixture the consistency of dough. You may have to mix it with your hands. Flatten it out into a cake, about 1/2 inch thick and fry it in a little oil, very slowly over coals or lowest possible flame.
Fry it, as gently as possible, turning it often. After the bottom is browned, prop the pan up in front of the fire’s flames to brown the top.

Bannock is about as easy as scratch cooking gets in the field, takes no time at all, and can be done without dirty dishes that need cleaning afterwards. I don't think using Bisquick is what makes bannock more or less tasty in the field - I think it's what you put in the dry mix that really jazzes it up and makes it into something different. I've thrown garlic powder, caraway seeds, rosemary, Italian seasoning, cracked pepper, Montreal steak sauce, Parmesan and/or Asiago cheese, and those phony soy "bacon bits" for baked potatoes into the dry mix, in various combinations, over the years. Not to mention probably a bunch of other stuff I've found in the spice cabinet or cupboards that I've forgotten - oh yes... slivered almonds is another.

It's all good, and plain old bannock ain't bad either.
Jäger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 01:48 PM   #54
KingRat
Stroppy.
 
KingRat's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: a citizen of the world
Oddometer: 25,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jäger View Post
When you get past the selective cherrypicking that went with the posting of that picture, at the originating web page you'll find that this immediately followed the picture:
"Which brings me back to the canned pork brains. Sadly(?), Armour no longer makes the product because the overall demand for it was so slight (shocking, I know)."
Really? Was it this one? Or this one? Or this one? Or this one? Or this one?

You have some front bleating about 'selective cherrypicking' whilst whining about a couple of foods with funny names and a couple of odd foods that are not to my taste either. I can only assume that you have never been to France.

Try the Andouillette.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jäger View Post
Herein lies an essential difference, and why Brit troops have earned their well deserved nickname. While pork brains in milk gravy can be found some places in America, there is so little demand for them that Armour stopped trying to market them. So it's not exactly an established dish in the "weird" US. On the other hand, Spotted Dick, black sausage, faggots and mushy peas, etc are not hard at all to find on menus in merry old England. Do we see those disappearing soon from English menus and grocery stores? Not likely.
It's a free country baby. I'm sure steamed fruit pudding, morcillo, meatballs and marrowfat pea soup won't get removed from British menus because some chap 3000 miles away doesn't like what we call them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jäger View Post
But, we digress...
Why was that, do you think?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jäger View Post
in NATO circles, there's a reason Brit soldiers are referred to as "shit eaters".
__________________
.
.

"Discourage self-help, and loyal subjects become the slaves of ruffians." - A. V. Dicey
"The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools." - Herbert Spencer
"Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people's money." - Margaret Thatcher
KingRat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 03:14 PM   #55
davsato
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: southern England
Oddometer: 799
this is getting silly now guys, this thread will get moved to 'jo mamma' and it started out as a thread about freeze dried backpacking grub!

my fault, my bad. i only wanted to know what biscuits and gravy was, it sounds vile because biscuits to brits are sweet little hard cakes, and we dont have gravy like that either. so OUR biscuits and OUR gravy would be vile but yours sounds alright to me. same as our food names sound weird to you guys but actually those things you list jager are all good stuff. except jellied eels.
and i cant understand how you get so much cholesterol in a 5oz can of goo, but in my experience if its bad for you its going to taste good. must be fried or something, fried brains like a hannibal lector/ray liotta moment.

and anduillettes are really good, pieces of pig guts in a cleaned out length of upper intestine to make a sausage. perhaps i really am a 'shit eater'? but you gotta try food before you say you dont like it, whatever its called.

i assume its plain flour in the bannock if you use baking powder too? could you use self raising, or wholemeal?
__________________
Dave
davsato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 03:50 PM   #56
AmuleK
What bike wants, it gets
 
AmuleK's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Wasatch Front, UT
Oddometer: 699
Gasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGuy View Post
I didn't mean putting them while you sleep. I meant to heat before climbing in. I've used the heaters hundreds of times and never seen them catch on fire however I wouldn't want to find out when I was sleeping.
What happens if hydrogen and methane mix?

BTW, does anyone else want these two to take their "over the pond" pissing match somewhere else and get back to the question of the OP?
__________________
2012 R1200GS "RALLYE"
2010 WR250R
"What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail? "
(On a plaque given to me by friend, Jeff Walker - gunned down in the Trolley Square shooting spree Feb. 12, 2007)
AmuleK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 04:06 PM   #57
DougZ73
Fading off.........
 
DougZ73's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: NJ
Oddometer: 6,827
Lets just get it back on track and stick to discussing the title topic: Freeze dried food and how you'd rate it. Simple as that.
__________________
Skyline Drive 11/2010 , Catskills 2010 trip, Catskills 2011 , Southern TNJT, 2011
DougZ's MTB thread , DZ Moto Photo Bloggin' , (my) Learning photography thread, DougZ vids
- Ryder Joseph Z. , Born 11/26/12-- the next Adventure: Grayson Hunter Z., born 5/3/14
DougZ73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 04:23 PM   #58
Jäger
Osons
 
Jäger's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: NW MT/SE BC
Oddometer: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by davsato View Post
i assume its plain flour in the bannock if you use baking powder too? could you use self raising, or wholemeal?
Yeah, plain flower or whole wheat. It doesn't really "rise". I suppose you could use self raising, corn meal, or even rice flour, potato flour, or something like that.

Never tried any of that, as the flour and baking powder mixes meet the requirement for light, compact, fast to prepare, and trouble free. Again, the nice thing about bannock is that a failed experiment at home only costs a few pennies and about half an hour of your time. You could try it right now and report back here on the results within the hour!

Anyways, you've now got my sum total knowledge on bannock; I have no more bannock enlightment to add. So while we're going over more freeze dried foods, I hope to sit back and see other ideas for "all the ingredients are already sitting in your kitchen" trail foods and buy and go packaged meals. I'd like to see more ideas out there than my standards of bannock, rice, and pasta.

The thing I really miss on the bike is dead flesh - I'm an unapologetic carnivore. I can do without my fruit and veggies for a few days between hitting town, but little tins of fish and meat just aren't enough to satisfy. I carry a lot of hot smoked Kokanee (a little landlocked salmon) and elk jerky, but I still miss a big chunk of fish or meat as part of a meal.
Jäger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 11:12 PM   #59
Toompine
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Toompine's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Oddometer: 111
Low Sodium nirvana

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrprez View Post
Just about anything from Packit Gourmet will make you want to never eat another MH again! They are a bit pricey but the quality is so much better.

Packit Gourmet

Thats the ticket, really good nutritional numbers and the food looked/sounded great. Priced not out of sight. Not cheap but comparable. Time to order up some test meals
Toompine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2011, 11:17 PM   #60
Toompine
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Toompine's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Oddometer: 111
Two meal packs

Quote:
Originally Posted by nvklr View Post
I've done this before, I think it cooks better that way actually.
I experimented with this over then weekend. Open the pack and split it into two meals. Put one servining back into the original bag and then stuff the second baggie into the original bag. Cook the first in the bag and save it to cook then second one in . No pots. The food needs to "reconstitute" and zipping it up in the orignal bag helps that. Works better than in a pot. Cheaper too because the two person meal is just a bit more expensive than a one person meal
Toompine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014