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Old 02-12-2011, 02:44 PM   #1
LasseNC OP
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The correct way of soldering two pieces of wire together.

I was wondering, as I am quite new to soldering when working on electrics instead of cramping.

I have two ends of old wire that has been split by PO for some reason, I don't want to tape it up. So I want to solder them and use some heatshrink on it afterwards.

Is it just laying the besides beside eachother? Or do they need to be fixed in some way for it to be stronger?
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:55 PM   #2
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Tin (melt solder onto them) the ends, lay them together heat till the solder melts. With solder less is more.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:55 PM   #3
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Here is one way...

http://www.dansmc.com/soldering.htm
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:56 PM   #4
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Strongest method is called a "linesman's splice". Good explanaition here with pictures. http://boost-instruments.com/splicing/splicing.html It does not show the soldering, as it isn't always done, but I always solder any joint. Just remember to put the heat shrink tubing on one of the wires before attaching them together. Don't ask me how I know.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:57 PM   #5
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Congratulations,

Soldering is always better than using solderless crimp connectors especially when exposed to the elements. Clean the ends of the stripped wire with some sandpaper or steel wool. The heat shrink should be cut so that it is about a 1/2" longer than the area to be soldered. Place the heat shrink over the wire and keep it away from the area to be soldered. Twist the wires together. Use solder with a flux core. After making the repair let it cool slightly. Slide the heat shrink over the bare wire, heat with lighter or hair dryer. Done. Simple.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:02 PM   #6
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Daveball, that linesman splicing is exactly how I thought I'd do it! Esquependo! (Spelling)

I will have a look at it tomorrow. Now I am just unsure if I have the correct size heatshrink, but it was on offer. 4.8/2.4 mm.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:02 PM   #7
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Yep ,I go with the twist and flux metod. Watch how long you keep the heat on the wires . You want a shiny connection but the longer you keep the heat on ,the farther up the wire the solder will travel making the wire stiff.
Don't forget to slide your heat-shrink on first and keep far enough away from the joint so it's not shrinking too soon.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:47 PM   #8
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And keep the tip of your gun CLEAN! A dirty tip doesn't tranfer heat very well and you'll end up melting the insulation before you melt the solder. To clean the tip, heat it, stick into the can of flux, and then wipe it with a damp rag.

Old, corroded wire is hard to solder. Clean the strands as best you can.
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:19 PM   #9
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this is the way I've been doing it for 30 years. Good solder (rosin core) is KEY and also a good iron.
step 1
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:20 PM   #10
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:22 PM   #11
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Good tips. I was an electrician in the Coast Guard so wires often corroded on board ships. Don't just clean the outside of the copper in stranded wire, use a wire brush and clean them well. I also put some flux on the wires when they are hot, seems to help the solder to flow.
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:28 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JUNAC View Post
Congratulations,

Soldering is always better than using solderless crimp connectors especially when exposed to the elements.
In the context of motorcycles, a good solder joint is seems to work fine. In aircraft crimped connections are the rule but done with special crimpers and connectors. Solder can fracture over time in an environment of vibration.
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:47 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JUNAC View Post
...........Soldering is always better than using solderless crimp connectors especially when exposed to the elements..
You can get butt splices that are encased in shrink tubing so they are watertight. As was mentioned, vibration is death to a solder joint. The biggest advantage to a solder joint is it's size. The only time we could solder wires together when I worked on aircraft avionics was if space was a consideration, and the crimp splices couldn't be staggered.

When I worked on yacht systems, we used the sealing crimp splices on systems that were likely to be submerged......bilge pumps, etc. They work really well.
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:52 PM   #14
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Some of you guys might be interested in a product called the "Crimp/Solder/Seal". I posted about them a few months ago in another thread:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...16&postcount=3
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Old 02-12-2011, 05:55 PM   #15
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Just a tip not mentioned yet; when soldering, you apply the heat to the wires. When they heat up you touch the solder (resin core for electronics, acid for plumbing) to the wires and they draw the solder into the spaces all around the strands.
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