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Old 04-08-2011, 06:19 PM   #16
Shibby! OP
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[Day 7]

***Intermission***… Cue the elevator music….



Ok, back to the main program:

Our stay at Cabo was limited. We were happy just to bum around our house rental. We had everything we needed. Cold beer, a pool, and warm sunshine to tan our ghostly white bodies.

We did venture out at times to eat. I found the restaurants expensive, loud, annoying, and generally not a great experience. Then again, I’m a 28 yr old who acts 50 and as cheap as they come. To me, if they aren’t happy with us paying for a 35-50 USD meal, and have the nerve to try and plug us for expensive drinks and desserts at the end when clearly none of us wanted any, I think they are trying way too hard. My taste of Cabo was a cash grab. Not my idea of a vacation. The food was better and much, much cheaper to the north. Hospitality was better, and the atmosphere much more friendly. Plus it lacked Gingo’s. Yes, I’m aware we were the Gringo’s, but I’d sooner be the only ones, or part of a small group. N.A’s are rude.
I feel it’s worth mentioning that we did have some good breakfasts at an expensive resort for cheap, but I felt that was more a sign of the times than the usual. Either way looking over a pool, a beach, and the ocean watching the dolphins swim by while I enjoyed my weak coffee and tasty eggs was pleasant. Well worth the $10.

Here are some pictures of the private beach our community had.





[Day 9]

Today was the day we started the dreaded trip back. We had a long ways to go. That feeling when you are “on the return trip” was there. Not a great feeling. We eventually got our bags packed and headed out. We had an easy, yet long day ahead of us. We needed to make miles on our freshly rested bodies. To make things interesting, the air was cool and crisp. A complete change from the norm we had coming down. It was so cold that today I tested out my grip heaters. I was very thankful to have them.

Unfortunately I didn’t get any pictures. We rode mostly highway and I just thumped along, enjoying the scenery with the odd view of the pacific. We stopped at Todos Santos for lunch. The owners were pleasantly surprised to find out we were from Canada and took our pictures with them. Their food was delicious and it was obvious we were getting away from Cabo San Lucas. Their restaurant was on the right hand side of the road as you enter town. I highly suggest if you are in the area you check it out. Great people and they love motorcycles.

The rest of the ride was back tracking on one of the roads we used to get down. To our surprise the blistering hot temperatures were replaced with rather cool temps. Still, this didn’t improve the uneventful section of highway. La Paz north is not a very scenic ride, but it beats working any day.

Eventually we arrived in Adolfo Lopez Mateos. I’m pretty sure we had a map with a different name, but that’s what Google maps shows. We found an interesting “hotel” where the owners set us up with three rooms. Their only three rooms. They were so kind to stop making their meal and make us whatever we wanted. I think they were as grateful to have us, as we were to have them when we pull into town at dusk. Very nice people. We handed out some stickers, showered up, ate some food and then went down to the water to take some pictures and poke things on the beach:




[Day 10]

The Mexican musical was once again a common thing. Dogs fighting at night, eventually having one dog whimper away and a chance to get some shut eye. The morning came and we headed down the street for breakfast. Strangely enough, free WIFI in a tiny town. Always amazed me.



We thankfully decided to avoid the highway we came in last night and did some sand roads/trails out. These were great fun with some small whoops and tight riding. Mostly straight, but better then slab. We arrived in town through yet another garbage dump. Parts of this ride were shown in Baja 2011 – Part 1.

Heading north into uncharted territory was first fairly uneventful. The road was rough as shat, with detours around the worst parts. At one point we were lucky enough to get off that road and take a rather entertaining gravel road back towards the coast. Soon enough the pacific was poking out between the hills and we found ourselves on a perfectly smooth piece of slab in the middle of nowhere. Odd how Mexico can play tricks on you. We were closing in on the surfer town of San Juanico. We were aware of the beach prior to this little town, so we headed towards the water for a chance to ride this epic beach. Getting there proved to be a little more difficult then first thought. You have to remember; we’re from Alberta, home of gnarly roots, rocks, and mud. The only equivalent to deep sand we have is deep snow.

Dwyane pumbled over the dunes with his bummed knee, eventually getting to a drift that he thought was soft. Turned out it was hard and he went down. Bike falling on him. As I was following I saw this happen. I tracked his line and rushed over thinking he’d be in pain. I dug the bike in and lifted the bike off. Thankfully all was good.

Looking back to see where Demi was, we discovered she was past axle deep trying to get into the dunes. Some clutch burning and lifting we managed to get the heavily packed DRZ on top of the sand. I found lifting the subframe while spinning the tire gets the bike back on top. Not something you want to do in deep snow with a sled.
Back at the bikes Demi putters by without issue. I get on my bike, wiggle it back so I can get it moving going down hill, whip a turn, head over a drift and burry the front wheel into soft sand. Shit!. By this time we had sand in our boots, sand in our helmets, and sand down our backs. That beach wasn’t coming easy…
Dion came to my rescue and pulled on the front wheel while I roosted sand into the air eventually gaining momentum and sharing victory with the rest of the gang. The beach raid was successful!

Demi overlooking the process:



We then enjoyed the fruits of our labour with a wheelie infused (or attempted) ride into town. Those few miles were great fun.

In town we gassed up, grabbed some liquids and grub, handed out stickers, and met some other riders three up on a KLR. They were Americans from Utah I believe. Apparently the two other KLR’s were up the street receiving some welding treatment. The whole time talking to them I was thinking there’d be a third soon.



Back in one group again, we continued to head north. We knew what was ahead of us and my anticipation was growing. We hoped to catch the whale tours, but that dream faded along with the setting sun… After some amazing riding on the salt flats we arrived at the tour towns with nothing but a few souls manning the only convenient store. Demi and I were sad we’d have to go without seeing the whales up close from a small boat. =( . One of my life’s goals is to get back there and pet a whale.

I’ll take a minute to make mention one other rule of Baja. That is to always ride at 60-80 percent. At one point before the salt flats I was busting arse down a sand trail over some small whoops when unexpectedly there were some HUGE sand drifts. I jumped one, landed funny, and nearly biffed it on the second. If I was going any faster I would have been cart wheeling with the bike risking injury.





For as far as you can see to the horizon, nothing but flat salt flats. You could ride anywhere.





Now that’s been said, we finished off the day with a scenic ride into San Ignacio with the setting sun behind us. The sun really played well on the hills and far off cliffs and terrain features. It was a pleasant ride back into town.



San Ignacio was our unexpected stop on the way down after our separation/mix-up. The little Oasis in the middle of nowhere.

In town, half the group got a tent at the San Ignacio Springs (owned by CDN’s), and Dion and I crashed up the road in the hotel, which was empty. Both very nice places. They were kind enough to allow us to lock our bikes up in their gated parking lot.
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Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:20 PM   #17
Shibby! OP
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[Day 11]

Picture of where Dion and I crashed. 65$ USD, we had the place pretty much to ourselves with a big room, and two queen beds. The normal price is 95$, but after some unintentional “haggling” we scored it for $65. On the trip we didn’t haggle once, we felt the Mexicans needed our money more then us, and the price we were paying was more then fair… ok, maybe the 20$ margarita’s were an exception, but that’s a whole different story.. In this particular scenario, we didn’t really want to pay 95 and simply asked where another hotel was that we were trying to find in the first place. He quickly counter offered to our unintentional haggling, landing us a good deal.



If you reading the report from the start, you probably remembered where we were supposed to go south, and not west and got a 2-3 hour delay with split parties? Well, today we’d travel the road we were SUPPOSED to have taken. Turned out to be a great sand road. The riding was fun, and the air was crisp. Today was going to be a good day… for the most part..

We eventually pulled into El Arco where the mix-up first started on our trip coming down. From here it’s once again uncharted terrain. We were to head north up a drainage valley, instead of crossing back east towards the Sea of Cortez and San Fransico area.



The ride started of slow with rough, dusty conditions, then turned into a ride to remember. Amazing road and scenery. I wish I took more and better pictures:









Eventually the road began to open up as we closed in on the pacific. It turned into a high speed sand road which is always a nice change in pace.

The sand road gave way to a small town. I believe it was named Jesus Maria. How could I forget such a name? We found the closest taco stand, quite literally across from the gas station and chowed down. We supported the little guy, which turned out to be a little shack with a plastic coke table. We piled around the table and the guy prepared the food where he lived in the room behind. Really good taco’s. I think we had 20..

After lunch/supper we headed north. After about 20 K of slab, we hooked a left towards the ocean. We got on an extremely fun little gravel/sand/rock road that led us the shoreline where we got this picture..





From here, some rode the trail after the wash, and Dion and I rode the beach till we eventually had to turn up the rocks and back on the road. At this point, for some reason rest of the gang joined in on the last bit of beach, only to find the rocks we encountered (huge pile of round river type rock that had drift like sections). Climbing back off the shoreline proved difficult to some. I failed to get pictures of people in frustration =)

It was, however, quite comical watching a big wave come in and wash Demi into about axle deep water. Water sprayed everywhere she was trying to ride through it and stay dry. Haha. Good luck.

At this point, miles had to be made. We didn’t have far to go, but the race against the sun was on. After all, we didn’t know where we were staying, or IF there was a place to stay…

Always time for a photo:





Eventually we pulled into town. Our first impressions were – Where was the town?!
I saw a road that went down towards the ocean, so we took that road and continued to wonder where the town was. What we found was a small village, and something seemed slightly off. It was the response we normally got from most small towns. The kids stayed by their parents and didn’t chase us through town, the parents didn’t wave, but just watched. Things weren’t bad, but just seemed a bit off. I think we were off the beaten path and they were just wondering WTF?

We found the local convenience store quickly and filled up with water, some supper snacks (cookies, yumm), and got gas out of some milk jugs.

We looked at our options. The people operating the convenience store had three rooms to rent, but they only had one double bed in each room. It would have been a roll of the dice who got the floor.

Some time during this process a newer Tacoma showed up with a guy from Alaska. Said he was grabbing some supplies and drove down from Oregon where he keeps his truck. Said he’s been doing it for a few years where every winter he ditches work and comes down to surf. Sounds cool enough, where do I sign up?

While talking things over he told us about a surf beach about 10 miles down the road and that they have papayas to block the wind and provide shelter. He said that is where he was heading and took off.

We mingled over the decision some more and Dion and I decided it would be cool to hang out like surf bums and camp on the beach. It was now dark, we had our snacks, and were determined to make it to the beach site.

We saddled up and rode out at night, not exactly sure where we going. I’ll be honest and say at one point or another I thought this wasn’t the best idea. It was windy, and getting cold quick. Plus I had a tent that I have yet to set-up. Thankfully my trusty HID lite up the surrounding terrain and we managed to get some ways down the road. Dion’s GPS maps said we were there, but there was nothing to see. I flipped up the light and shone it around. We saw something off in the distance, but after a passing a warning sign, we didn’t know if was a mine, or had open pits. Our spanish lacked big time.

Poking away at the trail, we finally pulled up to what we believed was the right place. Once rolling through a bit we saw that Tacoma the Alaskan guy was driving. We grabbed the only available hut and talked with the locals who came up to greet us. I’ll tell more about that, but they were both very interesting, and kind people.

We set up our gear by putting both bikes in the hut, and stringing my tent strings to the kickstands for support. My tent isn’t free standing, and I wasn’t wanting to set it up outside in the wind. It was, however, win-win for both, because my tent blocked the wind from Dion, who was sleeping behind the tent in a bivi on the floor. You can see our gear hanging off the floor to prevent the bugs of the desert from eating us in the morning.



We spent the rest of the night BS’ing with the Alaskan guy and trying to trouble shoot his electric cooler. He had quite the set-up with solar panels, high end batteries, and some other fancy gear. He knew what he was doing and just happy to be doing it. Good on him. I took a few notes from his notebook and stored them for good measure.


[Day 12]

We awoke to the sound of crashing waves and the warming of our tents brought forth by the welcoming sun. Another day, another great ride.



Once out of our tents we went about the usual morning routine. This time we had the pleasure of meeting some of the local inhabitants. Some had some interesting stories. A few groups have been on the move for a few months, surfing when they can, and just enjoying life. Definitely a different way of going about things.

We packed our gear and headed off to town to meet the others. There we grabbed some breakfast (those little cookie things again!) and rode out. Our ride started with a great little dirt/sand road snaking it’s way through drainage valleys, eventually poking out on the highway. We had a short distance to go where we’d once again bail off the highway back onto the dirt.







This was the point when Malcolm had a not-so-great introduction with a truck coming down the highway during the trip down to cabo. We were back tracking the trail that eventually would lead us into the point where Malcolm’s get off would leave him injured for the rest of the trip. We headed down a few miles, but turned around and did a slightly different trail to the secondary option into CoCo’s. This was the typical Mexican gravel road. Rough as hell, but still fun.



Oh! I wonder what’s on T.V!:





Dwayne retired his RMDRA shirt and had CoCo’s buddy hang it amongst the dainties:



Dion tending to his “broken” WR450. With almost 14,000K on the clock it decided to chew through a water seal and was leaking ¾ of the trip requiring hourly fill ups of the rads and overflow tank. This was fixed in a few hours at Yuma with I think $48 of parts. I’d hate to see the KTM pricing of equivalent parts.. Huge props for the small dealership in retiree capital Yuma for having these parts in stock. I was shocked.



Here’s where things got interesting. Since we opted out of the deep sand and gravel of Frog Canyon, we voted to not double up the road we came in on last time, but otherwise to take a new, unknown trail. We knew nothing about it. It was later in the afternoon so we figured we’d have time to try something new. After all, we didn’t have far to go.

On the trail we found the trial head after a little searching and were off! The double track trail started out with smooth sand a great views riding through the mountain ranges. This did not last for long. Soon the trail turned into some rocky sections, and some valley’s with rocky hill climbs. No problem, we’re used to this type of riding. After some minor struggles by some we got to the top to enjoy the view, only to find we had about 12 km’s to go and it looked like it would only get worse. And it did.




Getting into it.



The gang checking things out.



Stoked for some technical riding.




A short break. Notice the shadows getting long?



Shit hitting the fan. I enjoyed the ride. My tool box took a shit kicking, but I was longing for some sweat and grunting. I got my fix. There was a few K of this type of riding. Demi’s first “real” drop. Dion and myself the only remaining without dropped bikes. In the near future that would change..











Finally we were out of the mountains and back at it. Just in time to ride back with a setting sun and feeling the cool breeze coming off the sea.





We ended our day in Alfonsinia’s. Thankfully a plane that was to fly in didn’t make it and allowed for us to have room at the hotel. The hotel, last seen empty by us, was booked full from the Desert Assassins tour group.
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Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

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Old 08-22-2012, 06:23 PM   #18
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Just an incredible ride report! Thank you for taking the time and allowing me to experience it, too.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:24 PM   #19
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Just an incredible ride report! Thank you for taking the time and allowing me to experience it, too.

There's more to it that meets the eye.... The RR is not finished and there is a HUGE turn of events.

I'll see about getting that done. It's been on my list for a long, long time.
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Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

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Old 08-31-2012, 12:11 PM   #20
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Do you have a GPS track (or google map) of the road you took from La Paz to Cabo? Looks fantastic! I'm planning a trip and have been wondering if the last leg to Cabo is even worth it, but that road looks great.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:03 PM   #21
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https://maps.google.ca/maps?saddr=Ba...via=1,2,3&z=12


Just followed the coast all the way in. At one point you have to take the freeway from San Jose del Cabo into Cabo San Lucas though.

Another solid track is going north La Paz over to the Ciudad Consiticion. Problem is it can be a bit technical and is a long journey. Exceptional views and way the F* out there though. I suggest it if you can ride it. Just be ready to sweat a bit and have lots of gas.
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Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

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Old 08-31-2012, 04:04 PM   #22
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Great report. How long did the Maxxis IT's last on the ride?
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:17 PM   #23
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Great report. How long did the Maxxis IT's last on the ride?
I've now done multiple rides where they lasted 4000km. Not a lot of tread left, but still there.

The tire I started my other trip with lasted about 9000, and the front was 12,800km I think. Keeping in mind the rear was a slick for well over 1000km and the front's nubs were getting pretty short and poorly worn that that point.

I'm not one who requires perfect tires. Traction wise I just mostly notice it under braking when carrying that much luggage. You have to go into corners pretty easy, or at least get all the braking done prior to the corner.

Even when a slick they still work well on most conditions because the wider portion of the tire where there is worn flat nubs still contact. I remember a dirt road in Belize where I was railing corners and the center was perfectly smooth!



The funny thing was the border guys, military, and police all made comments about it being worn and needing replacing. haha. Yet their local pizza delivery bike and many cars have slicks for tires too, they felt the need to point mine out. We just shared a good laugh.
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Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095


Shibby! screwed with this post 08-31-2012 at 04:32 PM
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Old 11-14-2013, 03:10 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Shibby! View Post
There's more to it that meets the eye.... The RR is not finished and there is a HUGE turn of events.

I'll see about getting that done. It's been on my list for a long, long time.


Heading to Cabo in April.......you have till then to finish...
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Old 11-15-2013, 11:16 AM   #25
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Heading to Cabo in April.......you have till then to finish...

I'll try my best. I appreciate you reading this far into it, and feel I owe it to you guys that are doing so.

The events are still etched in my mind. It was, to this date, one of the most memorable times in my riding "career". And I'd like to think I've experienced a healthy share.
__________________
Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

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Old 06-27-2014, 09:44 PM   #26
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Would love to hear the rest of the trip!
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Old 06-28-2014, 09:44 PM   #27
Shibby! OP
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Thanks for reading the RR.

As I mentioned about 6 months ago, I owe it to you guys to finished.

I have a bit of an issue where my dog spilt coffee on my MacBook. I haven't replaced it. I enjoy the lesser amount of time spent on the computer. Either way if I can get my pics off the hd I'll try to finish the report, even if I have to do it after hours at work.

Thanks for reading! It's and ending that shouldn't be left untold.

Otherwise if you want more read my "heading south" trip. I'd love to start a new trip but my dog keeps me settled.

This summer we plan on a back country exploring trip in a couple weeks and if all goes to plan another stab at the Tour of Idaho T1 challenge on XR650R's. Last year we pulled the plug half way through the ride because of forest fires. What we rode was fantastic and can only anticipate completing he challenge.

Quinn

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Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

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