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Old 05-13-2015, 12:16 PM   #1
north2 OP
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Location: Santa Fe, NM
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09 KLR blowin' main fuses like bubble gum

Hey All, my 2009 klr-650 died while idling during a stop in a ride. after pushing the beast home i found the main fuse was blown. Replaced it and started the bike back up. Ran for about 3 seconds then BLAM! shut-down. The main fuse instantly blew again. What do ya'll think could be the problem? Im thinking a short in the wiring harness somewhere? Any help would be greatly appreciated~
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Old 05-13-2015, 12:25 PM   #2
ChromeSux
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The wiring harness on some 08 and or 09 have been known to short out. My neighbors KLR starting blowing fuses and after some internet searches we found there was a problem in the harnesses. His was shorting out near the steering head.

Just Google search and you can find the info.

Found this on Youtube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dJQczy9-88
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Old 05-13-2015, 01:09 PM   #3
rustynut2
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There are many rub area, the worst is at the voltage regulator on a bracket just next to it. Under the fuel tank is the next area.
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Old 05-13-2015, 01:48 PM   #4
north2 OP
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after pulling off the body work...

yanked the fairings seat and tank off and followed the harness, and while im no electrical expert there seemed to be no significant rubs exposing wire or even penetrating tape/insulation im at a loss here!
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Old 05-13-2015, 02:51 PM   #5
skistrom
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Look closely around the Regulater connecter right side of steering head. this seems to be the most "popular" spot. On my buddies 08 with same symptoms we were getting a sharp spark on hooking battery back up with everything turned off. We found it by disconnecting devices and knew we were in the right location when the spark at connecting battery up disappeared. The actual wear mark was very small and bare wire was almost not seeable.
The u tube video link is good. My buddy has since went over his entire harness with tape and armor shield at all critical areas. No problems since. You'll get it and the upside is you will improved the bike and your knowledge of it.
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:36 PM   #6
ChromeSux
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You may have to split the harness near the steering head area, i seem to remember doing that. I think we found wires inside the harness worn.
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:47 PM   #7
NHTOTEROAD
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The early 09's had a recall on the wiring harness. It might be worth checking with a Kawi dealer.
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Old 05-13-2015, 08:41 PM   #8
Argus16
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+1.
Right under the tank if I recall.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:08 AM   #9
Grinnin
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A multimeter can help you locate which wires are connected when they shouldn't be.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1062409

Some cheap meters require you to select a range before you use them. For a few dollars more an "autoranging" meter is easier to use. I have more expensive meters for some tasks, but for something like this, any meter will show you connections that you can't see from the outside. One of my cheap meters is small enough to take on every out-of-state trip.

I'd start by checking resistance from the fuse clips to ground. That'll quickly divide your bike into smaller sections. When you find the section that has low resistance you'll need to find the next set of test points.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:19 AM   #10
mjc506
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A nice way of testing repairs (or even just roughly locating the fault) without using millions of fuses is to connect a headlamp bulb in place of the fuse. When the bulb glows brightly, you have significant current flowing!

For this 30A fuse, you may need a really heavy duty bulb (or a couple wired in parallel) - 30A * 12V = 360W
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