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Old 04-18-2011, 12:55 PM   #46
VegasRider
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Have done 2 cross-countries solo. Lonely? Nope, but that's me. I know some fine riders that get lonely after 50 miles. YMMV
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Old 04-18-2011, 01:52 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speeder54 View Post

The idea of meeting others for short legs of the journey is also really exciting. A few days with new friends, a few days on my own. Sweet.
Like I said, I think this is the best. Keep me updated on when you plan on taking off. I might be a month or two ahead of you.
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Old 04-18-2011, 01:53 PM   #48
Gravetter
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Quick question that I'm sure has been answered numerous times. What does a solo do when they are crossing into new countries and are running in and out of customs leaving the bike unattended as a group natives stare at it?

I enjoy reading all the ride reports but it's fairly typical to read something like, "Joe stayed with the bikes as I went back into customs to check on the paper work". What does a solo do in that situation?

My thoughts on being alone:

I'm around people all day. Co-workers, friends, family and kids very soon. When I find that sliver of alone time, I love it. Anytime my wife is having a weekend trip with her girls, I try very hard to setup a solo trip. Whether it be a long car ride to an overnight backpacking trail or a weekend ADV ride, I strive to do it solo. As another poster said above, I find it hard to even arrange a pure solo weekend, let alone a 6 month ADV trip. Friends always saying, "I'll meet you at this campsite, or I'll ride with you to this city." For me, doing anything solo is rare so when I get the opportunity, I eat it up. When I do my SA trip, I think I'll be trying solo (if I can't get the wife to go) knowing I will meet many on the route and have plenty of alone runs as well.
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Old 04-18-2011, 03:03 PM   #49
Speeder54 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravetter View Post

I enjoy reading all the ride reports but it's fairly typical to read something like, "Joe stayed with the bikes as I went back into customs to check on the paper work". What does a solo do in that situation?
I would like to know more on this also. I've often wondered what a solo rider does with their bike/gear if they are camping and want to spend the day hiking. Does one just leave the bike at the camp ground and hope for the best?
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Old 04-18-2011, 08:51 PM   #50
LowInSlo
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Originally Posted by daveg View Post
I'm currently traveling "solo" around the world. I've been gone since the end of July and the only time I rode alone for more than a week at a time was in the USA. In the US, there aren't as many other riders making big trips. Usually it is quick weekend or weeklong trips and there are so many routes it is impossible to meet another rider going the same direction you are going.
...

Solo? Only if you try very hard.
Interesting, never thought of that aspect, having only ridden in the US.
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:00 PM   #51
surferbum
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speeder54 View Post
I would like to know more on this also. I've often wondered what a solo rider does with their bike/gear if they are camping and want to spend the day hiking. Does one just leave the bike at the camp ground and hope for the best?
My experience is that a campground is one of the safest places. Would like to see others experience.
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Old 04-19-2011, 07:42 AM   #52
TwoShots
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speeder54 View Post
I've often wondered what a solo rider does with their bike/gear if they are camping and want to spend the day hiking. Does one just leave the bike at the camp ground and hope for the best?
More often than not my hikes start at points without campgrounds or designated trailheads, such as desert washes or a hill or valley that simply looks interesting.

I park it on the side of the road and change from riding gear to shorts and a t, and hiking boots. Cable lock the riding gear to the bike... except riding boots which get tucked 'neath the bike. Centerstand it, lock the steering and I'm gone. I leave a note stuck on top of the gas tank that reads "NOT ABANDONED."

I've been doing that for 7 years or so. Never had a problem.

TwoShots screwed with this post 04-19-2011 at 07:48 AM
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Old 04-19-2011, 08:01 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoShots View Post

I park it on the side of the road and change from riding gear to shorts and a t, and hiking boots. Cable lock the riding gear to the bike... except riding boots which get tucked 'neath the bike. Centerstand it, lock the steering and I'm gone. I leave a note stuck on top of the gas tank that reads "NOT ABANDONED."

I've been doing that for 7 years or so. Never had a problem.
Do you think this approach will work in Central/South American countries as well?
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Old 04-19-2011, 10:39 AM   #54
TwoShots
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I would think it depends on where in Central/South America you're at on a given day.
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Old 04-19-2011, 11:01 AM   #55
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I take along recordings of the last four good arguments with my SO to play at night when I start to question myself.

The feeling goes away immediately.

just my $.02
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Old 04-19-2011, 12:12 PM   #56
samaza
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Originally Posted by Gravetter View Post
Quick question that I'm sure has been answered numerous times. What does a solo do when they are crossing into new countries and are running in and out of customs leaving the bike unattended as a group natives stare at it?
Hey guys, I rode USA and central with numerous different friends, and then South America solo. Leaving the bike is not a concern, it is to a degree but its not your biggest. At borders you can park a bike outside the window to keep an eye on it, or in a worst case, find one of the many guards with shotguns and park it next to him. Your bike should be lockable except for the tank bag you take with you into the customs.

My only chain snapped in colombia when I was solo. I left my bike with a 40yr old women who was shorter than the bike and lived with her chickens and palm tree farm for 40 years. I hitched into town and got a chain. I gave her a 1 or 2 for the efforts. Bike security is always an easy situation to handle.

Riding for days and days solo will be a test of your personality. You might enjoy checking in to the hotel and being by yourself, or you might get a little bored walking around by yourself. I found it more fun with friends, but when I was solo I learned to enjoy things that I hadn´t tried, and I found myself in conversations I would never have been with if I had been with a friend. Hope this helps.
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Old 04-19-2011, 02:55 PM   #57
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I would have to agree with samaza on the security issue. Borders in poorer/more troubled countries are typically are heavily guarded by armed personnel. People and staff are aware you're a foreigner and more interested in where you're from/going or the cash in your pocket in exchange for 'help' with your paperwork.

As far as roadside hikes go, I don't think you would be doing many. Random roadside designated trails generally don't exist, and venturing off into the wilderness may be risky depending on where you are.
Popular hiking areas are tourist areas and have bus/taxi service from town, allowing you to leave the bike at the hotel.

I think theft of your entire bike is very unlikely. Foreign bikes stand out in general and get noticed by the police. It would be difficult to get very far as a local on an abnormal bike. It wouldn't be useful to them and simply is not worth the risk.

I feel the whole 'everyone poorer than you is out to get you' is very much and attitude learned as North Americans, simply isn't true and detracts from the whole experience. Be smart about security, remove the opportunity, conduct yourself in a respectable manner and things usually work out fine.
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Old 04-21-2011, 05:09 PM   #58
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I rarely get lonely when I am alone.

When I get lonely, I find that more often than not I am surrounded by people.

Some people are comfortable alone, some are not. But you _can_ learn to be alone if you want to.
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Old 04-23-2011, 06:53 PM   #59
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just do like et when lonely------phone home!
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Old 05-04-2011, 03:41 AM   #60
Brunow - 007
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Drive with a mate get's me to all the place's i end up aking myself, how do we got here?

When i start thinking about things we are usually all the way in the dark zone... When you are solo you consider your options mutch more... But you can do & go what you really want!

Anyway it's up to you!

Ps: the dog post rocks!
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