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Old 04-15-2011, 11:46 AM   #196
Tall Mike
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Wow! Caught up!

Okay, So I've been reading the RR's of Canada to Argentina 2010, Corporate Runaways, and Jammin thru the Global South and wondering how far south you plan to go...

I'm not trying to kabosh your adventure here,... but it's getting to be WINTER in the southern hemisphere now.(my Cat's afraid for his life!)...Betitolara's pics from Argentina to Peru turned into a Winter wonderland! (Not really camping weather!) Patagonia is like Alaska...Just to set the stage. Am interested in your long-term time schedule and gear you are packing.

Following along... Wishing I was riding!
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Old 04-16-2011, 09:00 AM   #197
alpiner84
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Eek The real story ;-)

If anyone wants to know what really happened while Alex was unconscious, then dazed and unable remember the past five days of his life, and while Tom and Charlie and I figured out how to get him medical help and transport him three hours north to the nearest hospital...I'd read Tom's blog here: www.thetomreport.blogspot.com. It's the story titled "the livestock ambulance." There's another version on my blog, too, but Tom's is much more thorough. Enjoy!

Alex makes it sound like it was so easy! ;-)
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Old 04-16-2011, 10:11 AM   #198
HemReuter
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Ghost Sand

Hey All,

This is Tom and I'm sitting here with Charlie and Sarah. We all have been perusing Alex's explanation of his "minor" crash here and we are stumped too. It's so weird, none of us saw any sand on that curve... anywhere! It must have blown in during the three seconds between when Sarah rode through and Alex flew off the road. Those damn Baja sands! So sneaky!

We'd also like to mention for all you other travelers out there that this "minor" crash took the work of an army of Mexicans to clean up with the help of three other travelers who had a lot better shit to be doing than going back to San Quintin for three days.

I don't care if it was sand, oil, or speed (BINGO!) that caused Al to speed off the road; this was a serious accident and it shouldn't be glossed over as some freak incident with nothing to be learned. We all sobered up off the thrill of this sport after seeing the wreckage.

Furthermore, the truck that moved the bike did not work Alex over. "Want to drive a gringo's bike ninety miles north on a moment's notice in your vintage pickup at 5:30pm on a Monday? You couldn't have anything better to do right Senor?" $100 was a steal. It was either that or leave it back in Catanina for Alex to go retrieve on his own.

Al, we love you, we miss you, and we want you to rejoin us as soon as your bike is ready. But as the three eye-witnesses of your brutality, it is very unsettling to read these posts that basically say how hard you got f***ed over and how your amazing riding skills saved you from an even worse ending. Why is it that three other "inferior" riders made it through and thought nothing of that turn?

Please, from all of us: lose the hubris. You drove off the rode and we saved your ass. I know you'd do the same for any of us in a heartbeat and I hope you'd scathe me in the same manner if I showed such little appreciation for an event that was so traumatic to everyone else. To all you other ADVers out there, thanks for all the great advice and keep wishing us warm winds.

Al, we are in Murege today, April 16th, and we will be moving south slowly in the next couple days. I may ride ahead of these two soon and find a windsurfing beach in La Ventana. After the last 500 miles of endless wind, it is getting unbearable. See you soon amigo, hasta luego.
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Old 04-16-2011, 10:39 AM   #199
jesusgatos
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Whoa, it's way too soon for this kind of shit. What's up? Didn't read anything about this guy trying to say that he did anything but crash. Did I miss something?
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Old 04-16-2011, 11:15 AM   #200
easyrider88
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i had A dream

great story alex.thanks for sharing it with me.AHH youth.to be 24 again.i survived it.hope you do also!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 04-16-2011, 12:20 PM   #201
bigalsmith101 OP
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Ahoy! I am on the road!

I got on the road yesterday at about 3pm, and road till 9pm, lights blasting, going below the speed limit. Listening to my bike. Freaking out. BUT...

Everything is ok, and I am good to go!

I am currently in Santa Rosalia, BC, Mexico. It is like 85° here right now, and I camped on the side of the road last night. It was cheap and easy. I literally just pulled off the side of the highway a couple hours after the sun when down, and woke up at 6am and got on the road. I am now about an hour north of where everyone else is, if they didn´t already leave today. They spent last night in Mulege.

Onward!!!

Oh, can anyone tell me why my bike pulls slightly to the right when I hit the front break? It didn´t do that before...

--Alex

P.S.
Tom, if I tell everyone that I could have easily DIED, how are my parents supposed to handle that?

P.S.S
Tom, Charlie, and Sarah did more for me in the past few days than I´ll be able to do for them over the course of many months. Of course their effort is undeniably appreciated, and I am humbled by there actions.

P.S.S.S.
Tom, I love you too.
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Old 04-16-2011, 12:22 PM   #202
Master Shake
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Location: Inside looking out - Tuscaloosa, AL
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Well said, probably needed, hopefully appreciated, but in private.
Don't toss your buddy under the public bus. If you feel he's taking risk and putting himself or your trip in jeopardy, then thoroughly thrash him when he catches up to you ... right after you give him a bear hug.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HemReuter View Post
Hey All,

This is Tom and I'm sitting here with Charlie and Sarah. We all have been perusing Alex's explanation of his "minor" crash here and we are stumped too. It's so weird, none of us saw any sand on that curve... anywhere! It must have blown in during the three seconds between when Sarah rode through and Alex flew off the road. Those damn Baja sands! So sneaky!

We'd also like to mention for all you other travelers out there that this "minor" crash took the work of an army of Mexicans to clean up with the help of three other travelers who had a lot better shit to be doing than going back to San Quintin for three days.

I don't care if it was sand, oil, or speed (BINGO!) that caused Al to speed off the road; this was a serious accident and it shouldn't be glossed over as some freak incident with nothing to be learned. We all sobered up off the thrill of this sport after seeing the wreckage.

Furthermore, the truck that moved the bike did not work Alex over. "Want to drive a gringo's bike ninety miles north on a moment's notice in your vintage pickup at 5:30pm on a Monday? You couldn't have anything better to do right Senor?" $100 was a steal. It was either that or leave it back in Catanina for Alex to go retrieve on his own.

Al, we love you, we miss you, and we want you to rejoin us as soon as your bike is ready. But as the three eye-witnesses of your brutality, it is very unsettling to read these posts that basically say how hard you got f***ed over and how your amazing riding skills saved you from an even worse ending. Why is it that three other "inferior" riders made it through and thought nothing of that turn?

Please, from all of us: lose the hubris. You drove off the rode and we saved your ass. I know you'd do the same for any of us in a heartbeat and I hope you'd scathe me in the same manner if I showed such little appreciation for an event that was so traumatic to everyone else. To all you other ADVers out there, thanks for all the great advice and keep wishing us warm winds.

Al, we are in Murege today, April 16th, and we will be moving south slowly in the next couple days. I may ride ahead of these two soon and find a windsurfing beach in La Ventana. After the last 500 miles of endless wind, it is getting unbearable. See you soon amigo, hasta luego.
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Old 04-16-2011, 01:23 PM   #203
El Explorador
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Great read, excited to see what comes next and very glad you got out of that one none the worse (save the cash) and no doubt a touch wiser.

Good luck, and actually I too am curious about your plans for the cold...
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Old 04-16-2011, 04:09 PM   #204
BikerzL8E
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Ketchup

Sounds like you've got some nice warm weather to be riding in. Hope you catch up soon.
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Old 04-16-2011, 04:33 PM   #205
benihaha
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Say it!

Say it like it is Tom, it's part of the story.
So to repeat, and to all adventurers out there -
Kick your boots under your bed, or bike, before you hit the sack and while you're on your knees looking for them next morning .... maybe say a little prayer... for a safe and pleasant journey.

Keep those cards and letters coming, Al.
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Old 04-16-2011, 04:55 PM   #206
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigalsmith101 View Post
I got on the road yesterday at about 3pm, and road till 9pm, lights blasting, going below the speed limit. Listening to my bike. Freaking out. BUT...

Everything is ok, and I am good to go!

I am currently in Santa Rosalia, BC, Mexico. It is like 85° here right now, and I camped on the side of the road last night. It was cheap and easy. I literally just pulled off the side of the highway a couple hours after the sun when down, and woke up at 6am and got on the road. I am now about an hour north of where everyone else is, if they didn´t already leave today. They spent last night in Mulege.

Onward!!!

Oh, can anyone tell me why my bike pulls slightly to the right when I hit the front break? It didn´t do that before...

--Alex

P.S.
Tom, if I tell everyone that I could have easily DIED, how are my parents supposed to handle that?

P.S.S
Tom, Charlie, and Sarah did more for me in the past few days than I´ll be able to do for them over the course of many months. Of course their effort is undeniably appreciated, and I am humbled by there actions.

P.S.S.S.
Tom, I love you too.
The bike pulls to one side most likely because the forks were bent and then straightened but not quite perfectly the same as it was pre crash,triple clamps could be bent,frame could be bent a little.
Sounds like a hard crash into a pile of big rocks at speed,most anything could be tweaked. You'll get used to it.

When people do trips like this,staying together is often a good plan,leaving a rider behind cause he crashed isnt how I would do it.
Your not in that big a hurry,are you?
Riding solo in Baja is an invite for bandits to descend if you get stuck on the roadside,happened to a friend of mine within 15 minutes of being stuck solo on the side of the road,three guys knocked him around and stole what money they could get off him.they couldnt load his beemer in the truck as they had no ramp and the truck was too tall.

Riding till 9:00 at night is also one of the worst ideas possible,large dim witted animals appear quickly in the dark.

Its all part of the adventure,have a blast! but concentrate on whats happening on the road.
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Old 04-16-2011, 05:03 PM   #207
hardroadking
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Location: Columbus, OH
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Inverse relationship between speed & sight seeing

Hey Big Al,

Glad to hear you are ok and back on the road after your 2nd accident.

There is an inverse relationship between speed and sight seeing. The faster you go, the less great scenery you can enjoy during your trip. We all need to figure out where that balance is, and then ride a little slower, while on this kind of trip. Bike parts are easy to replace, body parts, no so much. It is so much fun to push the limits on the dirt but this is best done on dirt close to home and not in a 3rd world country where medical help, if needed may be far away and of a caliber below that of what you’d have at home.

You have proven early on in this trip that you are riding above your ability or your judgment is lacking. These two get-offs were at high speed and you have been very LUCKY to come out with just bruises. You were also LUCKY to have help close by in your riding partners and local ambulance. Please save the “dirt road thrashing” activities for local rides back home and enjoy and prolong this awesome adventure you have ahead of you by taking it easy while riding unfamiliar roads where you have no idea of what is behind or in the next corner.

We all have different goals for the experience we are looking for in this kind of trip. I am thinking, and this is just my bias, that this kind of trip is not primarily about motorcycling. It’s more about experiencing the different cultures, foods, smells, landscapes, friends made, freedom felt and the motorcycle is just the tool that get’s you to and through these experiences. The motorcycle definitely enhances these experiences but it’s a trip/adventure first, and a motorcycle trip/adventure second.

Nobody following your trip wants to see you get hurt to the point that you have to abandon your trip. There are enough uncontrollable variables out there while traveling on unfamiliar roads and foreign countries that could end your trip prematurely. There’s not much you can do about those so please control the things that you can control such as your speed, and following distances and not riding at night, and riding a bike in good mechanical condition to help reduce the risk of your trip ending earlier than planned.

And even if you think you are invincible (which you probably do) remember there is more than just YOU to think about. You have family and friends at home that will be very worried about you for the duration of your trip based on what has happened so far. There is “normal” worry about a loved one traveling in a foreign country but now they have all sorts of “extra” worry relating to the motorcycle aspect of the trip and your judgment and ability to carry on this trip safely on two wheels. You also have your traveling buddy(s) to think about. Your friend from home signed up for a trip with you to your ultimate destination. If he thought there was a good chance of having to do this trip alone, he may not have been interested in it. So you have an obligation to him to manage the risk you can control, in order to complete the adventure together, as planned. The same thing goes for Sarah and Tom, your actions effect them too. They don’t want to spend their valuable vacation/travel time picking up your pieces and arranging for your health care and bike transport/repair because of your bad judgment. They probably are not going to be too interested in riding behind you for the rest of the trip due to your compromised motorcycle and your riding skills / judgment.

Sorry to be so harsh but hey, it’s the truth and sometimes that hurts even worse than the bruises and sore body you are feeling now. I’m probably telling you what your loved ones would like to say but don’t dare to as they don’t want to make matters worse for you by giving you a scolding and possibly a “well I’ll prove you wrong” reaction.

It sounds like you obviously sustained a concussion in the crash. Your most important piece of equipment is your helmet. Please replace it as soon as possible. Your old helmet is now junk and just gives you a false sense of security.

Wishing you the best for the remainder of your Excellent Adventure. Enjoy the sights and sounds and tastes and friendships and cultural experiences. These memories will mean the most to you upon your return. Take care, Tim
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Old 04-16-2011, 05:54 PM   #208
Biker's Mama
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Biker's Mama

Big Al,

Maybe your title should change to No Jobs, Some Responsibilities and Lots of Time.

Thanks Tim!
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Old 04-17-2011, 05:02 AM   #209
manshoon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardroadking View Post
Hey Big Al,

Glad to hear you are ok and back on the road after your 2nd accident.

There is an inverse relationship between speed and sight seeing. The faster you go, the less great scenery you can enjoy during your trip. We all need to figure out where that balance is, and then ride a little slower, while on this kind of trip. Bike parts are easy to replace, body parts, no so much. It is so much fun to push the limits on the dirt but this is best done on dirt close to home and not in a 3rd world country where medical help, if needed may be far away and of a caliber below that of what you’d have at home.

You have proven early on in this trip that you are riding above your ability or your judgment is lacking. These two get-offs were at high speed and you have been very LUCKY to come out with just bruises. You were also LUCKY to have help close by in your riding partners and local ambulance. Please save the “dirt road thrashing” activities for local rides back home and enjoy and prolong this awesome adventure you have ahead of you by taking it easy while riding unfamiliar roads where you have no idea of what is behind or in the next corner.

We all have different goals for the experience we are looking for in this kind of trip. I am thinking, and this is just my bias, that this kind of trip is not primarily about motorcycling. It’s more about experiencing the different cultures, foods, smells, landscapes, friends made, freedom felt and the motorcycle is just the tool that get’s you to and through these experiences. The motorcycle definitely enhances these experiences but it’s a trip/adventure first, and a motorcycle trip/adventure second.

Nobody following your trip wants to see you get hurt to the point that you have to abandon your trip. There are enough uncontrollable variables out there while traveling on unfamiliar roads and foreign countries that could end your trip prematurely. There’s not much you can do about those so please control the things that you can control such as your speed, and following distances and not riding at night, and riding a bike in good mechanical condition to help reduce the risk of your trip ending earlier than planned.

And even if you think you are invincible (which you probably do) remember there is more than just YOU to think about. You have family and friends at home that will be very worried about you for the duration of your trip based on what has happened so far. There is “normal” worry about a loved one traveling in a foreign country but now they have all sorts of “extra” worry relating to the motorcycle aspect of the trip and your judgment and ability to carry on this trip safely on two wheels. You also have your traveling buddy(s) to think about. Your friend from home signed up for a trip with you to your ultimate destination. If he thought there was a good chance of having to do this trip alone, he may not have been interested in it. So you have an obligation to him to manage the risk you can control, in order to complete the adventure together, as planned. The same thing goes for Sarah and Tom, your actions effect them too. They don’t want to spend their valuable vacation/travel time picking up your pieces and arranging for your health care and bike transport/repair because of your bad judgment. They probably are not going to be too interested in riding behind you for the rest of the trip due to your compromised motorcycle and your riding skills / judgment.

Sorry to be so harsh but hey, it’s the truth and sometimes that hurts even worse than the bruises and sore body you are feeling now. I’m probably telling you what your loved ones would like to say but don’t dare to as they don’t want to make matters worse for you by giving you a scolding and possibly a “well I’ll prove you wrong” reaction.

It sounds like you obviously sustained a concussion in the crash. Your most important piece of equipment is your helmet. Please replace it as soon as possible. Your old helmet is now junk and just gives you a false sense of security.

Wishing you the best for the remainder of your Excellent Adventure. Enjoy the sights and sounds and tastes and friendships and cultural experiences. These memories will mean the most to you upon your return. Take care, Tim

Nice read, right up till my eyes started to bleed from the yellow post. Sounds like a fun trip so far, but if you plan to make the trip and be in one piece at the end, slow down.

Like the others have said here, riding at night in Mexico is crazy dangerous. Keep it on two wheels, slow down and enjoy the moment.
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Old 04-17-2011, 12:04 PM   #210
Motojournalism
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HemReuter View Post
Hey All,

This is Tom and I'm sitting here with Charlie and Sarah. We all have been perusing Alex's explanation of his "minor" crash...
I do love a public internet flogging

Good to hear both sides of the story, thanks for dropping by HemReuter

Just kicking back from behind the keyboard, keep it coming!
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