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Old 09-24-2014, 01:42 AM   #1
bigalsmith101 OP
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1974 TC100, Frame up Restoration and Rebuild

About 2 months ago I bought a 1974 Suzuki TC100. A dual range, 4speed transmission vintage dual sport. Aside from the dual range being difficult to shift in and out of, the bike ran pretty well after fiddling with it a bit, and I used it as my daily little rip around town bike until about 5 weeks ago when I toasted the piston while riding at high speeds.

I discovered when I opened it up that it had already been bored .040

Unfortunately, I couldn't find a .050 over piston on the web, so went with what I could find. A .080 over piston. I wish I could have found something more reasonable, such as a .060, so that I'd have another step to go if/when it needs it, but I'll deal with that dilemma when it comes.

I just got back from a month out of the country on vacation with my parents in Ecuador, and the whole time I kept seeing bastardized versions of Suzuki AX100's ripping through the streets. I started getting some ideas.

Then I got home, and I decided that my bike, affectionately named " The Mob", needed some attention.

First thing, the cylinder and new piston we dropped off at the shop yesterday to get bored out. I'll pick them up tomorrow.

I had the intention of just slapping the motor back together and ripping around town some more, but the more I look at it, the more I want to make it AWESOME.

So today, my wife Kristi and I began the Frame up Restoration and Rebuild of "The Mob", to make it more AWESOME than it already is.

This is how it started, head and cylinder already off the motor.


Everything easy came off first. The seat, tank, side covers, fenders, carb cover/carb.



Every part that's coming off is getting the soapy water treatment. Kristi is meticulous, so it's not worth telling her "that part is clean enough". It's clean enough when she's put it on the tarp to dry off... Dirty on the left, clean on right (next to the wall).



This bike doesn't look/feel like it's been cleaned for a very long time. Maybe never...

I've gotten the engine out now.


The Dual Range Transmission lever is rusted into position. When I took the side cover off, it leaked rusty water. Good thing this part is housed separately from everything else! The water was nearly thick with rust, and the roller bearing plates that press against the shift mechanism were rusted through. As is, completely rusted away. No wonder it wouldn't shift between low or high gear without a massive kick...

I've got the bits soaking in engine degreaser and a lubricating slime. I should be able to pull the shifting lever out of it's configuration, but it's rusted in there. Even a dead blow hammer failed, as I didn't want to break the lever off. Time will tell what else is needed.



Then I took a look at the internals of the crank. I don't want to split the cases on this thing. It's running well already, and aside from a worn shift fork causing it to bounce out of 4th every once in a while, it seems fine.

Then I see this. It looks like the rotary valve has broken at some point. Should I be worried about this??? It's got me a bit worried.


Taking a look at my manual shows that Suzuki offered a Motocross Kit for this bike that increased the opening in the rotary valve by a sizable amount. Other than the damaged edge on the rotary valve, need I think much more about it?


When I stopped worrying as much I took down some more things.


Then finally ended up with a bare frame.


And a load of bagged up parts.


As I tore down the bike to it's frame, several things became apparent.

A "to do" list for the bike consists of the following in no particular order:

  • Install bored out cylinder with new piston
  • Clean and prep frame for paint
  • Clean and coat inside of gas tank and prep outside for paint
  • Prep side panels, fenders, and wheels, bars, and muffler for paint
  • Repair leaking fork seals
  • Replace burnt out bulbs in gauge cluster
  • Replace ghetto wiring job where necessary, possibly rewire entire loom one step at a time.
  • Replace chain and sprockets
  • Replace rear tire
  • Replace battery
  • Clean and repair contacts/switch in front brake light switch
  • Make sure horn functions 100%, not intermittently

I'm sure I'll find more to add to this list, but that should be most of it.

I'm going to keep the paint scheme and design a mini secret for now, but it'll soon become apparent what I have in mind. I can't promise to please everyone, but I'll be sure to please myself!

More to come soon.
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Old 09-24-2014, 11:12 PM   #2
bigalsmith101 OP
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Cleaning, Cleaning, and more Cleaning.

This is what a lot of today looked like.



There is a lot of rust on the underside of the fenders, and a bit of pitting on the rear rack along with the head light bucket. Even the wire wheel on the drill is having a hard time of it.

My brother in law is a professional painter, so I'm pretty excited to get the parts prepped and ready for paint. He's either gonna paint them for me, or let me use his paint equipment. I'm kinda hoping for option number one, because than it'll be professional. But I'm also hoping for option to, so I can learn how to paint some stuff (albeit poorly).

We'll see how it goes!
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Old 09-26-2014, 12:15 PM   #3
rrrnnn
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Nice! Looks like fun...looking forward to seeing the progress
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Old 09-26-2014, 09:14 PM   #4
bigalsmith101 OP
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Gas tank and forks

So, in disassembling the fork/triple trees, I've found EVERYTHING to be crusty as hell. Just seriously gunked up.

So I stopped by the moto shop that I frequent and ordered new oil and dust seals for the forks, bought a cable lubing tool, and got all the part numbers for the steering head bearing assembly.

The triple tree has ball bearing style upper and lower bearings, and during dis-assembly half of the ball bearing went flying into different corners of the garage.

I don't want to re-use them anyway (though they actually look to be in great shape) so tomorrow I'm headed to the local bearing shop with the frame and triple tree to see if I can't get a regular bearing with the same dimensions as the original bearing assemblies.

Suzuki sells the bearing assemblies, but as individual parts. $1.05/ball bearing at 18/bottom, and 20/top, long with the races. I'll get 4 sets of bearing for the same price if I can source standard roller bearings.

Yesterday and today I used the Kreem Fuel Tank Liner kit to do three things.


1) Clean the shit out of my rusty ass gas tank while etching the interior surface. This is what the liquid acid/water mix looked like after etching the tank.


2) Sufficiently dry the entire interior of the tank using Methyl Ethyl Keytone (a desiccant)

3) Line the interior of the tank with a rust preventative coating while simultaneously sealing and pinhole cracks or leaks.I'm letting the tank liner sit overnight before repeating the coating process again tomorrow.

The kit comes with enough to coat a 5gl tank (so it claims) though my tank is only 1.7 gallons. I'll do it a second time at the least. Maybe even a 3rd if I feel like it.

Tomorrow my brother is law isn't working, so I'm going to hound him to help me get started with the painting process so I can figure it out. At the very least he'll be able tell me what kind of paint I should be looking at so I'm not wasting my time. Going to wait until I have everything ready to assemble prior to painting though, as I'd rather do it all at once.

bigalsmith101 screwed with this post 09-26-2014 at 09:34 PM
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Old 09-27-2014, 08:55 PM   #5
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And the cleaning continues...

So, yesterday I picked up the bored out cylinder from the boring shop. The man did an excellent job, and the new piston/cylinder have a clearance of .002" of an inch.

Today, I disassembled the forks and drained the 40 year old fork oil from the forks. The dust seals are toast, but are already on order. The oil seals look fine, but aren't. They were leaking slightly prior to disassembly. They are already on order as well.

I can't seem to break free the rusted dual range transmission lever, even after 2 days of soaking in rust remover compound, so today I stuck it in the bucket of tank cleaning fluid from when I cleaned the tank a couple days ago.


The engine went together nicely, with perfect ring gap and clearance. New cir-clips in place, and the cylinder went on nice and easy.


Head back on.


Not much else to do at the moment but clean the rest of the parts going back on the bike.

I hope to get started on painting the bike sooner than later, but we'll see how that turns out.

On Monday I hope to secure new bearings for the steering stem, and with any luck I won't have to wait too long for the fork oil/dust seals to arrive.
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:28 PM   #6
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Getting Ready for Assembly...

I'm wondering if anyone reading this has any good suggestions or recommendations on pricing for sand blasting and subsequently powder coating the parts to be assembled on my little mini bike.

Everything metal. Specifically the: frame, fenders, tank, handlebar, headlight bucket, headlight brackets, battery box, rear rack, fork lowers, and the wheel assemblies.

Should I have the engine blasted too? I worry about the fine particles getting into the engine. Maybe just paint it with high heat silver paint instead?

How much should this stuff cost? How much did you pay? Or what other route should I consider?

I'll be calling around on Monday to get a better idea.

--Alex
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Old 09-29-2014, 02:25 AM   #7
JonW
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Was following along your build and then.... Ahh... Kreeme...! I would remove it now if i were you, as unless Kreme have sorted out their issues with Ethanol then this will be a headache. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news...
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:36 AM   #8
bigalsmith101 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonW View Post
Was following along your build and then.... Ahh... Kreeme...! I would remove it now if i were you, as unless Kreme have sorted out their issues with Ethanol then this will be a headache. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news...
I accept your bad news with utter glee and happiness......

Actually, there are a couple of Non-Ethanol vending gas stations nearby that I intend to use with this puppy. Got a 40gl tank in the garage that we pump into our motorbikes and outboards.

So hopefully the Kreem holds up.

Keep following. I might have my parts at the sand blaster today!
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:41 AM   #9
Hughlysses
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigalsmith101 View Post
I'm wondering if anyone reading this has any good suggestions or recommendations on pricing for sand blasting and subsequently powder coating the parts to be assembled on my little mini bike.

Everything metal. Specifically the: frame, fenders, tank, handlebar, headlight bucket, headlight brackets, battery box, rear rack, fork lowers, and the wheel assemblies.

Should I have the engine blasted too? I worry about the fine particles getting into the engine. Maybe just paint it with high heat silver paint instead?

How much should this stuff cost? How much did you pay? Or what other route should I consider?

I'll be calling around on Monday to get a better idea.

--Alex
Cool project. Here's all you need to know about blasting in one post:

http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....7&postcount=86

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Old 09-29-2014, 11:31 AM   #10
bigalsmith101 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hughlysses View Post
Cool project. Here's all you need to know about blasting in one post:

http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....7&postcount=86

JEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSUUUUUUS.

If that happened in the garage I'm working in (attached to my parents home), I'd have some very serious issues on hand.

I can't imagine noticing the film of soda gathering on EVERYTHING, and then CONTINUE doing it with 40lbs more. But, I've got friends that would, so I totally understand that guy!
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Old 09-29-2014, 01:49 PM   #11
Hughlysses
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigalsmith101 View Post
JEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSUUUUUUS.

If that happened in the garage I'm working in (attached to my parents home), I'd have some very serious issues on hand.

I can't imagine noticing the film of soda gathering on EVERYTHING, and then CONTINUE doing it with 40lbs more. But, I've got friends that would, so I totally understand that guy!
I still crack up every time I look at those pics. IIRC, he said he opened the drawers to tool chests weeks later and found a layer of baking soda in those too.

At any rate, soda would probably work really well on your aluminum engine, but you probably DON'T want to do it in your garage.
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Old 09-30-2014, 09:22 AM   #12
Fiftygrit
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I have a small hand held sand blaster, has to be filled often but for small jobs works pretty well. I just drag my air line and it out in the middle of my yard and blast away, every time I see his shop after the soda blasting I kill myself laughing. Good luck, nice that both you and your wife enjoy re-builds, cheer`s
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Old 09-30-2014, 11:10 AM   #13
bigalsmith101 OP
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Blasted and ready for paint

Yesterday was a good day. The Sandblasting shop was open and free of schedule, meaning my parts got blasted nearly immediately.

I'm glad I have a big ass car. It's trunk is massive ('97 Grand Marquis).


If you live in the PNW, in or around Marysville, this guy does good work.


It's $95/hr for the shop rate. I paid $70 cash, and in return received my blasted parts.


This stuff is CLEAN.


Today I went to the paint shop and bought some supplies.

Things have changed since I planned my original paint scheme. Essentially, rather than paint the bike a funky paint scheme, I'm just going to paint it the color it already was. Black.

I chose Por15 top coat, as it's UV resistant and damn near impermeable. It's gonna be awesome.


Should be painting today. Here goes nothing!
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Old 09-30-2014, 05:09 PM   #14
JonW
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Nice fast work. Excited to hear what you think of the painting process.
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Old 09-30-2014, 06:53 PM   #15
bigalsmith101 OP
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First step first, prepping the tank for paint. I started this approach with the hand sander and 80 grit emery cloth. That worked pretty well but was tough going.



Then I had a flash of brilliance (normality really), and got the drill and wire brush out and made short work of it.


Then I got to work stringing up all the parts to be painted.


I hung the heavier objects, (swing arm, muffler, frame) directly from the ceiling rafters.

The other items all hung from a single line tied to supports on either side of the garage.

My brother in law had hooked up the cheap ass $20 paint gun that I bought at the paint store to the compressor along with the pressure regulator.

I thinned the POR-15 down 5% with POR-15 Reducer, and got to work painting.


Now it's time to let them dry.
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