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Old 07-03-2011, 11:00 AM   #1
LaurelPerryOnLand OP
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How to remove an ALTERNATOR from 06 R1200GS - A Pictorial

LEGAL DISCLAIMER...Following any or all of the procedures described below is done at your own risk.

This thread documents the steps required to remove/install an ALTERNATOR from an 06 R1200GS. It is appropriate for 05-07 R1200GS' and MAY be appropriate, as a general guide for 08-present models.

Note: Before starting this procedure...be sure to disconnect the battery. Negative first...then positive.
Why?: http://7faq.com/owbase/ow.asp?GoodEn...tingTheBattery


Step 1. REMOVE FUEL TANK

This pictorial begins at a point where you have REMOVED the FUEL TANK. The step by step process to remove the tank is described on JVB's R1200 DVD and is available through his website at http://www.jimvonbaden.com/

Photobucket



Step 2. REMOVING and REPOSITIONING of 2 ELECTRONIC BRAIN MODULES (CENTRAL VEHICLE ELECTRONICS) from their plastic carrier.
The two modules are 'stacked' on top of (or beside) each other and are secured in a plastic housing. The modules are removed one at a time from the rear of the bike forward. Here's a view from the side of the plastic carrier that shows how it operates.

This view shows the plastic housing (without the modules installed) in the closed position.

Photobucket

The next view shows the plastic housing with the first section OPEN. This section is opened by releasing (pushing up) on 2 clips at the top of the carrier and rotating the 2 3/4" wide panel towards the rear of the bike.
Photobucket

This view shows how the plastic housing holding the 2nd module is released. There are 2 tabs along the sides which are released by pushing in. This portion of the housing is then released and rotates upward exposing the 2nd module.

Photobucket

So...that's how the plastic carrier works. Now, let's take a look at where it actually appears when you remove the fuel tank.

This photo shows the plastic housing AFTER the first module has been removed. It has been rotated 180 degrees and has been secured to the bike with the yellow tape to hold it during the rest of the procedure.
Photobucket

After releasing the 2 tabs on the sides and rotating upwards, the 2nd module is exposed. Gently lift the unit from the plastic housing and rotate it towards the left side of the bike as shown in the next photo. You may want to secure it to the bike to prevent any movement during the remainder of these procedures.

Photobucket

Step 3. Removal of the PLASTIC HOUSING from the bike frame.

In order to expose the alternator electrical connectors at the top of the unit, this plastic frame must be removed from the bike frame and rotated out of position. The plastic housing is secured to the frame at 4 places: 2 clamps around the bike frame at the BOTTOM of the plastic house and at 2 rubber grommet locations at the top of the housing.

The next 2 photos show the clamps in the CLOSED and OPEN positions. This view is from the REAR of the plastic housing.

Clamps CLOSED

Photobucket

Clamps OPEN

Photobucket

Simply PUSH these clamps DOWN and towards the center of the bike to release them. (They may come apart when doing so but can be easily re-assembled).

The plastic housing can now be rotated on the RUBBER GROMMETS at the top of the housing.

To fully release the plastic housing from the 2 grommets at the top, gently pull the entire plastic housing to the left or right. You will be releasing 1 grommet at a time from the horizontal bolts with the exposed threaded ends. After you've removed either grommet...simply side the remaining grommet in the opposite direction and the plastic frame will be completely released...

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RELEASE THIS HORIZONTAL BOLT...IT IS NOT NECESSARY!

The following photo shows the horizontal bolt with the exposed threaded ends AFTER the plastic housing has been removed.

Photobucket

Rotated the plastic housing to the right and secure it.

Photobucket

Step 4. Removal of the Alternator Electrical connector and anchoring bolts.

With the plastic housing now removed you can easily see the ALTERNATOR and it's electrical connectors appearing between the frame of the bike.

Photobucket

Now...remove the SQUARE connector at the left side of the alternator. It lifts straight up and has no other clips securing it in place.

Photobucket

Now, remove the black rubber cap off of the right hand electrical connector and remove the nylock nut with a #10 socket

Photobucket

Remove the RED lead and secure out of the way but leave the black lead as this lead is connected to the alternator itself.

Step 5. Removing the ALTERNATOR shroud at the front of the alternator.

The alternator cannot be removed by lifting it vertically because of the bike frame. It must be removed towards the front of the bike. The next step is to remove the (4) #20 TORX bolts securing the shroud frame to the alternator.

This photo shows the shroud. It is located and access immediately above the black cover for the alternator COVER. It looks like this:

Photobucket

Step 6. Removal of the ALTERNATOR BELT.
In order to access the Alternator Belt you need to remove the Alternator COVER. It looks like this an is accessible immediately behind the front shock.

Photobucket

There are 3 #25 TORX bolts at the BOTTOM and 2 #20 TORX screws at the top of the cover.

Follow the procedure described in the following link to remove the alternator belt:
http://www.r1200gs.info/howto/alt-belt.html


Step 7. Removal of the bolts securing the ALTERNATOR to the bike.

There are 3 #10 External TORX bolts securing the alternator to the bike frame. They can be removed from the TOP side of the alternator with a long extension once the adjacent wiring has been carefully pushed to the side. There are 2 on the LEFT side and 1 on the RIGHT side (facing forward).

Now...all of the electrical connectors and mounting bolts have been removed and the alternator should be free and clear and ready to be removed once the front shock is removed.

Step 8. Removal of the FRONT SHOCK.


The Alternator is removed by carefully moving it FORWARD (not UP) towards the front of the bike. As such, the front shock must be removed to provide the necessary clearance.

In order to remove the front shock, remove the #15 mm socket sized nut at the top of the shock and the bolt at the bottom of the shock and gently remove the shock.

Step 9. Removal of the ALTERNATOR.
Carefully slide the ALTERNATOR straight forward. Now you should have something in your hands that resembles:

Photobucket

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 12-25-2011 at 07:09 AM
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Old 07-03-2011, 01:23 PM   #2
JimVonBaden
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Nice work, and a lot of work it is, right?

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Old 07-03-2011, 01:27 PM   #3
LaurelPerryOnLand OP
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"Magic is what people don't understand".

A LOT of work, but not really complicated once you've done it ONCE.

BTW: This is probably one of those things you'll NEVER do twice!

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 07-04-2011 at 09:07 AM
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Old 07-03-2011, 03:26 PM   #4
bwallis42
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Thanks, never had to do it but it is good to read about how it is done so if some day...

Just one little comment. You left out the bit about disconnect the battery first, should probably add that to the start of the procedure just in case someone follows it and forgets to do that. I know, it's obvious but you wouldn't want to forget to do it.
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Old 07-03-2011, 07:00 PM   #5
rdwalker
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LaurelPerryOnLand, what was the reason you pulled the alternator on your bike?
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Old 07-03-2011, 07:03 PM   #6
dfwscotty
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Thanks for taking the extra time to take some photos and the write up!
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Old 07-03-2011, 07:51 PM   #7
Jason1202GStime!
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Good write up! Thanks for the pictures and guidence! Hope I wont be needing it soon...
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Old 07-03-2011, 07:59 PM   #8
PARIAH
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Well done!

Any idea what such a repair would cost performed at a service center?
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Old 07-04-2011, 06:42 AM   #9
SpEd
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Most excellent write up LPOL. Great pics and really descriptive. Thanks and good job.
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Old 07-04-2011, 09:04 AM   #10
LaurelPerryOnLand OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PARIAH View Post
Well done!

Any idea what such a repair would cost performed at a service center?
I've never seen a wallet that THICK...or a credit card with that HIGH of available credit.

Removal/Installation/NEW Alternator (Parts & Labor): $1,500? My guess. Probably twice that as I'm always shocked when I see 'the bill'.
NEW Alternator alone is $760.

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 07-04-2011 at 09:25 AM
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Old 07-04-2011, 12:44 PM   #11
Dan Căta
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Why did you remove it in the first place? These should be rock solid, just like the ones on cars.

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Old 07-04-2011, 02:19 PM   #12
LaurelPerryOnLand OP
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Why oh why do some people do such silly things...

Dan,

Geez...whatever you do don't tell the rest of the world why I replaced the alternator and really didn't have to!

I connected a stupid power wire from a high vis brake light set to the diagnostic plug instead of the Centech (switched power)!
That little mishap resulted in the appearance of the WARNING LIGHT and BATTERY icon symbols appearing...right after I installed the lights.

Here's the blow by blow of the entire event. Sheesh.

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=701671

And...YES...these alternators ARE rock solid. So rock solid that I even have an extra one now sitting on my shelf in the event the world collapses.
Update: Alternator SOLD 12/1/2011

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 12-26-2011 at 01:56 PM
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Old 12-26-2011, 11:10 AM   #13
regularfella
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A suggestion

I'd suggest having a bad alternator rebuilt if you have an electrical shop available. Usually they rebuild starters and alternators. I've found it to be very cost effective. You'd be surprised how cheap it can be. I've saved much $$ doing so when repairing BMW & Mercedes cars. Denso makes a really good product BTW.

Caution: be careful that your wiring can handle any upgrade in amperage if you go that route
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Old 12-26-2011, 11:26 AM   #14
LaurelPerryOnLand OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by regularfella View Post
I'd suggest having a bad alternator rebuilt if you have an electrical shop available. Usually they rebuild starters and alternators. I've found it to be very cost effective. You'd be surprised how cheap it can be. I've saved much $$ doing so when repairing BMW & Mercedes cars. Denso makes a really good product BTW.

Caution: be careful that your wiring can handle any upgrade in amperage if you go that route
Several of the local electrical shops that I called told me that they were unable to get the PARTS for the R1200GS Denso alternator that I thought was bad...and as a result...were unable to rebuild it.

Glad for me...the alternator wasn't defective...it was the way I wired my Hyperlites that was!

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 12-26-2011 at 06:03 PM
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Old 12-26-2011, 06:33 PM   #15
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Nice! Bookmarked!
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