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Old 01-31-2014, 11:39 AM   #2416
Baja Dad
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Okay guys needle help here
I've looked back to the thread a little bit but still cannot find what I'm looking for


Can someone please post what parts are needed and where to get them
to install dual brake lines on a tiger 800xc with ABS

I would really appreciate it it will help with my conversion for the two bikes I am building
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Old 01-31-2014, 11:45 AM   #2417
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Originally Posted by satrider View Post
Thank you, Yossarian. I wonder where one can purchase from in the U.S. Did a Google search, and nothing real turned up. Can someone please post a description and dimensions of the filter? It would be nice to find a replacement for it :-)
just placed a group order to NorCal haha there are no US sellers... trust me i have tried. Just go here and order... shipped the following day!
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Old 01-31-2014, 12:03 PM   #2418
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja Dad View Post
Okay guys needle help here
I've looked back to the thread a little bit but still cannot find what I'm looking for


Can someone please post what parts are needed and where to get them
to install dual brake lines on a tiger 800xc with ABS

I would really appreciate it it will help with my conversion for the two bikes I am building
After you install the new hoses, from what I understand you will need a dealer or need to use DealerTool to get the computer to let you bleed the system. That seems to be the hitch in the get-along, wrangling the ECU and ABS to cooperate with the bleeding process.
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Old 01-31-2014, 01:34 PM   #2419
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Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
After you install the new hoses, from what I understand you will need a dealer or need to use DealerTool to get the computer to let you bleed the system. That seems to be the hitch in the get-along, wrangling the ECU and ABS to cooperate with the bleeding process.
I have a Triumph Tech that will do all that
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Old 01-31-2014, 03:55 PM   #2420
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Originally Posted by Baja Dad View Post
I have a Triumph Tech that will do all that
A local hydraulic shop should be able to make the hoses to your spec. Strip the bike so they have access to the nearest connection for the hose to the caliper and they should be able to get all the particulars for fitting orientation, bend, hose lengths, and necessary hardware.

Look at the hose routing on a late model KTM Adventure for some ideas for routing down to the calipers.
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Old 01-31-2014, 05:36 PM   #2421
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Have you seen the routing for the front brake hoses on the Tiger 1200? Wow, talk about convoluted.
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Old 01-31-2014, 07:23 PM   #2422
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Have you seen the routing for the front brake hoses on the Tiger 1200? Wow, talk about convoluted.
Yeah, it is what it is.

I suppose he's wanting to go with a high fender up front and wants to get the hoop line clear of tangling with the knobs.

Same hydraulic shop might be able to splice in a T into the existing hose, near the lower triple clamp, then a couple of longer runs could be made from there, one to each caliper.

Another way to consider, using the OEM lines, might be to trim away most of the existing fender, leaving just enough to hold the lines and remain stable. Raise it as high as possible, cutting out on top the area that might hit the triple tree on full fork compression. That might get it far enough away to prevent packing with mud, and with most of the fender trimmed away it would be a lot easier to clear if it did.

Then, add a high fender and remove the beak. It is too fragile to leave on for racing as evidenced by those two guys in Australia who rallied a couple of Tigers and came home without the beaks after the mounting points broke.
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Old 01-31-2014, 07:51 PM   #2423
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Originally Posted by PYG RYDR View Post
Yes, I found this as well. It appears no U.S. companies stock this particular filter. I see, though, they will ship to U.S. from Australia.

Thanks.
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Old 02-11-2014, 10:29 AM   #2424
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Soupy's Adjustable RASISING Links Review

The Tiger 800XC has limited shock adjustability, although itís not officially a ďdirtĒ bike, there are some of us that just donít know any better and ride trails like it's a 450. I wanted to improve Pennyís off road ability and know I needed to spend lots of hard earned cash that I didnít have, if I wanted to improve the suspension. I started looking into raising the bike and didnít like the fixed link alternatives. Iíve seen Soupyís lowering links and they look Uber beefy, I called Soupy and he was more than happy to shorten a set of their lowering links to give me more ground clearance. Yes, the links need to be shorter, to pull the lower links together which in turn gives us more ground clearance. Maybe one of these cold snowy days Iíll do an experiment and find what the length/clearance ratio is.

I rode Penny for about 4K miles with the shock adjusted on the factory recommended road settings and it was pretty compliant. Off road I was able to load the shock going over woops and water bars, she floated pretty well over these types of features, transmitted little high speed vibrations (washboards) to the body and handled slab better than expected. I had little to no body fatigue from long rides.

At 4K miles I adjusted the shock to the factory recommended off road settings. I lost that nice compliant feeling, losing the ability to compress before woops or features I would have otherwise floated over. she was also transferring a lot more road noise to my body from washboards and long stints of slab. I was still bottoming out on the same rocks and logs as with the more compliant setting.

At about 6K miles I installed a set of Soupyís adjustable links that were modified to allow for raising the bike 1-2ish inches. (Iíve raised the bike 1.25Ē and will go for more this spring)
I left the shock adjusted for off road and did not adjust the fork height.
Iíve since put 4K miles on this setup and wish I hadnít waited so long to make this modification.

Iíve notice an improvement with both on and off road performance.
On slab, itís easier to load the rear for cornering, stays settled till just the right moment when she launches out of the corner and has regained that road setting feeling on long rides. (No sore back and neck like the off road setting)
The steering geometry from the increase in clearance quickens the steering, but not so much as to washout the front in mud or sand, any more than before.
Off road, I no longer bottom out on my local loops, that nice compliant feeling is back and itís easy to load the shock and Penny floats like she did when adjusted for the road with stock links. I donít place a lot of emphasis on two foot stops and have yet to get in trouble because I couldnít get a foot down while trail riding.

The only issue have is I now need to carry a small block of wood to ďextendĒ the side stand. Other than that a shorter set of links has significantly improved the Tigers off road worthiness.



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Old 02-11-2014, 11:53 AM   #2425
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Soupy is now stocking raising links for Tiger 800

http://soupysperformance.com/triumph...ing-links.html
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Old 02-11-2014, 04:03 PM   #2426
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I've got K60 F/R and am running right at 12500 miles on the set. Got to love 'em
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:53 AM   #2427
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Damn Noodle, your XC has colon cancer!
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:24 AM   #2428
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What they don't tell you about shorter or longer links is the effect on spring rates. It changes the geometry of the suspension. Which in turn changes the effective spring rate.

Shorter links can be a good by increasing the effective spring rate. It can also effect the travel of the rear suspension. You probably have less of it, because it limits droop.
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Old 02-12-2014, 11:26 AM   #2429
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Originally Posted by itsatdm View Post
What they don't tell you about shorter or longer links is the effect on spring rates. It changes the geometry of the suspension. Which in turn changes the effective spring rate.

Shorter links can be a good by increasing the effective spring rate. It can also effect the travel of the rear suspension. You probably have less of it, because it limits droop.
Well, the first part about the geometry changing is accurate and is something most people don't take into consideration when using lowering links. Riders installing these should check sag after installation to determine if a preload adjustment or another spring is needed.

The last bit is mistaken in this case, as the OP indicated this link was designed to increase travel. It isn't a lowering link, as is most commonly installed.
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Old 02-12-2014, 01:20 PM   #2430
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Originally Posted by itsatdm View Post
What they don't tell you about shorter or longer links is the effect on spring rates. It changes the geometry of the suspension. Which in turn changes the effective spring rate.

Shorter links can be a good by increasing the effective spring rate. It can also effect the travel of the rear suspension. You probably have less of it, because it limits droop.
As I noted, there was limited effect to handling due to the change in geometry. I personally think the Tiger can benefit from a slightly shorter wheel base or steeper front end, which was accomplished by raising the bike.
I'm thinking that the change in the spring rate has made the suspension more compliant while keeping the shock adjusted in the more stiffer "off Road" settings, which in this case was a good thing.
As near as I can tell, there has been no reduction in rear suspension travel. Believe me when I tell you, I beat the snot out of this bike and hammer up, down and over terrain that pushes the suspension to the limit and I have not noticed any compromise in rear travel.
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