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Old 09-08-2011, 02:12 PM   #46
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Perhaps an idea

I don't know what those kendons look like up close but can you flip the axle to gain ground clearance? I've done it with another trailer.

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Originally Posted by Twohondas View Post
The Kendon tows fine with the Wing...............I just do not want to tow on a dirt road again unless there is no option. The trailer gives you a great option to set up a comfortable base camp and importantly makes for comfortable desert crossings in the summer.




The trouble with dirt roads is they are not consistent and have some bad patches. This road is in Idaho. Did about 40 miles in dirt.............slow.

Putting on a center rail and truck mud guards helps with flotsam and jetsam but the lack of ground clearance complicates matters.
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Old 09-08-2011, 04:34 PM   #47
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Not mine, just found it on eBay today.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Motor...-/130571834339
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This is a piece of junk trailer that is made of very cheap material, I bought it few months ago here on EBAY and amazingly they are still offering for sale, well I was planing to use it some day in one of my trips to carry my motorcycle, unfortunately the very first time I used it falls apart on the road, I was lucky nobody behind me got hurt or with a car damage by the parts start falling on the road, regardless my almost 500 dolars investment on the trailer plus another 500 on a new and real trailer on Tractor Supply, anyway this !!SALE!! its mostly to try to avoid and hope none else get in an accident in the future by buying a trailer that can turn into a huge damage to your wallet or someone else life, if there is anyone that want to buy this piece of junk, I will just tell that I will use the money to donate it to a charity here on Ebay. and if you see another trailer like this for sale be aware its a piece of junk and the seller besides my self of course, will give you 30 day Warranty but they will deliver it two weeks later so that will reduce your warranty by half so check the pictures and judge by your self on the pictures if this trailer worth the money and the risk, and consider my motorcycle weight much less that the one on their advertising.
See other pictures at the link above.


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Old 09-08-2011, 05:08 PM   #48
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Not mine, just found it on eBay today.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Motor...-/130571834339
See other pictures at the link above.


Holy Hell! He might have broken it with the 23 extra straps! I've not a bike tied down much worse than that! Criminy Christmas!!!
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Old 09-08-2011, 11:52 PM   #49
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This was just to get my bike to Turkey. it's been sat unloved in our compound for the last 6 months.
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Old 09-09-2011, 11:52 AM   #50
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Mine. A cheap 5x8, welded a rac to mount an old rocket box which holds camping gear. A couple of HF chocks, and a mount for our force 10 stainless boating BBQ grill.
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:11 PM   #51
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Here is a photo of a Stinger trailer that I use.

The drawbacks- in my opinion, are as follows: 1)It can only haul one bike, 2) It's expensive.

The good- 1) It folds up extremely compact, so it fits in my garage without taking up a lot of room. 2) Super easy to load any kind of bike.

It is built very heavy- good enough for heavy road bikes, such as HD's and GoldWings, so the company claims.





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Old 09-09-2011, 06:50 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
I don't know what those kendons look like up close but can you flip the axle to gain ground clearance? I've done it with another trailer.
Note sure that would work with the Torison bar suspension.

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Old 09-10-2011, 10:35 AM   #53
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Hmmmmmm

I did a bit of looking around the web on this and found no solutions. If it were me I'd call Kendon and propose two changes and get their reply.
1st I'd measure the ground clearance on the rear of your Chevy pickup under the rear axle's hub/carrier at the lowest point. That's probably all you need and can use.
2nd I'd have a really good fabrication guy weld in some gusseting and essentially another square tube above the axle to drop the axle 1-2 inches.
3rd I'd get some new fenders and put larger tires on your axle if that axle will take it. If not I see Kendon makes a trailer for cars so surely that axle will work although I suspect any competent trailer place will have one or can make it. There are places online to get them custom for cheap. Then I'd install the same tires and wheels as your pickup has. You Kendon has 12s or perhaps 13s (I read both online depending on whether yours is USA made or China made)? If your PU has 16s or 17s then that would add 3-4 inches perhaps more depending on tire size. You might get another inch or two from the increased tire size. I'm going from 13s to 17s and the tire size is relatively huge so that's another two inches. Just increasing the tire/wheel size appears to give me more ground clearance than my wife's 4Runner so that is all I need - assuming the current axle will take it.
So by lowering the axle and adding larger tires that adds maybe 4-6 inches. You could find those Chevy wheels as takeoffs on Craigslist I think for cheap.
Considering how expensive Kendons are, and how much more usable your Kendon would be after this, I think you'd likely get most of your investment back when you sold it someday.
I was on the phone with Mario yesterday at http://www.adventuretrailers.com/aboutus.html and he schooled me on alot of this.
For example, because I intend to tow this with my wife's 4Runner I should use the same wheels and tires as the 4Runner so the trailer doesn't need a spare.
I also read alot on EP that torsion axles don't do well offroad. But I don't know if that means the extreme stuff they do over there on EP or just regular offroad in general.
What do you think?


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Originally Posted by Twohondas View Post
Note sure that would work with the Torison bar suspension.


bump screwed with this post 09-10-2011 at 12:36 PM
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:29 PM   #54
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Some serious thinking on this I see!

However, I really do not need an off road capable trailer. Maybe if I had a 4WD pickup it would make more sense.

This problem only occurs when I am setting up a base camp in the boondocks! Mostly I use the pickup to carry stuff for the base camp (Big cooler & tent & cot) but usually I have an improved campground with good roads so ground clearance is not an issue.


I could always do this and tell my buddies to fend for themselves.



Frankly I will not use the Kendon on very poor roads again.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:40 PM   #55
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That makes sense

I hear ya. IN my case I'm trying to get away from using my pickup as my wife's 4Runner get's more than twice the mileage of my dually and with 4WD goes alot farther in and has no problems with sand and so forth.

Looks like you are in SD. Do you do that dual sport run the SD DS clubs put on in February?


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Originally Posted by Twohondas View Post
Some serious thinking on this I see!

However, I really do not need an off road capable trailer. Maybe if I had a 4WD pickup it would make more sense.

This problem only occurs when I am setting up a base camp in the boondocks! Mostly I use the pickup to carry stuff for the base camp (Big cooler & tent & cot) but usually I have an improved campground with good roads so ground clearance is not an issue.


I could always do this and tell my buddies to fend for themselves.



Frankly I will not use the Kendon on very poor roads again.
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Old 09-10-2011, 02:34 PM   #56
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Mostly I ride in Borrego (soon again maybe??), in AZ along the CO river and up in the San Diego MTs.

I ride with one or two guys not with a group but my "abilities" limit my horizons!


I got the KLR for mostly "adventure" riding whatever that is. Kendon does really tow well even if you are limited a bit by ground clearance for off road travel.

KLRs on the way to Seattle for KLR trip to Alaska in 2010.


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Old 09-10-2011, 04:46 PM   #57
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Wow!

Thanks for the great posts JR.
There's a lot of great observations here.
Good observation about fuel bottles at the rear. Sounds like an experience tested decision.
It's interesting to me that riding can be so different in other places. Once we leave here and head to the Dez there's no place to shop! We can get some gas and that sort of thing but no groceries.
This is probably a stupid ? but what is the rake for?
I'm really glad you shared your observation about what can't be packed on the trailer because the trailer turns totes and bags into a kind of lapidary tumbler/vibrator. It hadn't occurred to me but I have the same problem with a growing mass of stuff too delicate for the pogo stick trailer suspension. I actually brought this up with Mario at Adventuretrailer.com during a phone call yesterday.
Another good observation concerning beer vs liquor. I know a guy who only brings Codeine #4s for that exact purpose. He travels light...
Those are some skills packing on a flatbed trailer.
And kudos on keeping the open class bikes ripping!


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Originally Posted by JR Greenhorn View Post
My trailer is nothing special, but you asked about packing gear as well, so here goes:

I've been using a 101" x 10' snowmobile trailer to haul bikes for years now. Snowmobile trailers have some specific pros and cons (I can elaborate if you'd like), but they definately offer deck space. They're also among the lightest trailers available for their size; I think this one is around 450lbs empty.

Four or five bikes is the norm for riding trips (usually three of us traveling together):







It looks like a hodge-podge packing job, and it sort of is, but in reality each thing you see on the trailer has a semi-specific position that has been refined over years of trips. It's usually the same two or three of us going on these trips, and things have become so habitual that we load up surprisingly quick without much need to talk to one another much at all anymore. Well, I guess usually the placement of the last couple of tie-down straps does tend to get over-discussed.




Probably the most specific postioning visible in the photos is the fuel jugs. One of the main reasons those are in the rear is so that any spills or leaks don't get into the other gear. Also, having them all lined up at the back like that simplifies fill-ups at the gas station. We usually try to haul them empty most of the way to our destination, stopping to fill them at the last gas station that offers non-oxygenated gas from a dedicated hose.

Hauling the jugs empty also allows them to be filled and used as balast along the way, repositioning them if necessary. On one trip years ago, we picked up an additional guy and his machine & gear along the way, and struggled to get things loaded with enough tongue weight to make the trailer tow worth a shit. Filling all of the gas jugs we had and strapping them as far forward as possible helped.

We've also had too much tongue weight when my buddy "tops off" the ice in that huge cooler of his pictured on the tongue. Filling the fuel jugs on the rear somewhat helped in that instance as well (not ideal, but better than nothing). The fuel jugs pictured hold 16 gallons, which works out to just over 100 lbs. The water jug is another 50 lbs, but that's usually filled at home (for water quality/taste reasons).




One other thing that I usually put on the back of the trailer that isn't pictured here is an empty (or mostly empty) plastic tote. I prefer to buy most of my groceries en route, prefferably as close to our destination as possible. We've found this to be the overall quickest way for 3+ guys to coordinate and split food for the trip, and it's one less thing to deal with packing at home (our wives get annoyed with any advance preprations, so avoiding a grocery run a night or two before departure helps keep the peace at home--YMMV).

Also, and perhaps more importantly, I like to buy my groceries at the closest well-stocked grocery store to our destination. It's an "ambassador of the sport" thing for me, not only spending money in the towns near where we camp and ride, but most importantly you're towing bikes into their town and it's flat obvious that you're spending money in their town. We tend to be overly polite while in town, trying to make the best impression possible. Also, we do any shopping for adult beverages in our hometowns before we depart, again to keep up appearances and represent the sport in a positive way.

I've gotten off track here, but my point was simply that the empty tote at the back of the trailer makes it easy to load the groceries right into something without having to partially repack a bunch of stuff just to find a place for it. It also keeps things like bread, buns, and chips from getting smashed.




Looking closely, you may or may not be able to see cots, a canopy, plastic totes, a loading ramp made from an 8' 2"x12" (with a long strip of coarse sandpaper glued to it), a rake etc. It's pretty easy to slide most of that stuff around when loading/unloading bikes, and things like totes and coolers usually never come off that trailer for the whole trip. Once at camp, fuel cans get moved to the shade underneath the trailer.


Of what you can see that I wouldn't recommend, definately not the green Rubbermaid tote in the center photo. We've since been upgrading our totes to more robust water & wind resistant types with latching lids. The big gray one in the top photo is my buddy's. It's lid latches very securely and stuff inside stays dry, but two totes half that size are easier to deal with.

Also, don't haul the grill on the roof like that. It gets full of bugs that later get baked on, and my buddy claims it costs him 1mpg to have it up there. I can't confirm that, but I can confirm that's a huge pain in the ass to get it up and down from there without scratching anything.




Some things I make it a point not to haul on the trailer. Clothing bags, sleeping bags, tents, and other things that need to stay dry (and are easy to stuff into the two vehicle) are obvious, but I also don't haul toolboxes on the trailer anymore. The trailer just doesn't ride as smoothly as the two vehicle, and over time the tools get kind of rough looking from banging together and vibrating along on the trailer. Similar are camp stoves, grills, lanterns, and things like that that don't tolerate rattling and harsh bumps particularly well.

We used to haul with a 20-lb propane cylinder, but that proved to be enough of a pain that we've gone back to the little disposable ones, which are also a pain in different ways.

I breifly mentioned adult beverages above, and that's another thing that factors into our packing system. Two of us that go don't drink beer at all, and it turns out beer is not a very efficient way to pack and transport alcohol. Instead, we usually have a couple bottles of whiskey, brandy, or maybe some rum. That stuff comes in very robust glass bottles, doesn't need to be kept cool, and is usually pretty easy to stuff in somewhere. If we bring soda for mixers, 2L bottles are similarly simple to pack. We've picked on my poor cousin (the third guy who usually goes with us) so much over the years that he hardly dares bring even a 12-pack anymore. If anything, he'll bring just a few bottles of what he claims to be "really good" beer these days, so we figure we're doing him a favour.





Hopefully something in all that is helpful to you. I think back to some of my first riding trips with this trailer (and its predecessor), and it's funny how much of a mess we had. Things now wouldn't look much different to an outside eye, but the little things you learn from doing things wrong over the years really contributes to eventually developing a system that works for you.


I recently bought a Jumping Jack tent trailer, so I'm kind of back at square one with my loading system. I'm very exicited though, as the Jumping Jack will make several things so much easier, and it pulls much nicer than this trailer does. Loading and unloading bikes is proving to be a challenge, though.
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:00 PM   #58
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what is the rake for?
Pine needles and prairie grass, mostly. Most of the time it gets used to clear debris for a tent's footprint, and to smooth out the duff. One of our most frequent riding trip destinations (read: the closest one to home) is logging land for paper production. The trees are mostly jack pines growing out of a sandy forest floor. Between the sand and the duff, the ground can get pretty lumpy to pitch a tent on, even if it is relatively level.


Also, at times we've made new camp sites in certain places, and the rake works well to clear grasses and whatnot from around the fire ring. Of course, it works just as well to rake the material back over the fire ring area as well.

Finally, if you have someone along who can be prone to doing stupid things with fire, the rake makes a handy implement to stop the spread of a grass fire, kind of like a poor man's McLeod.

I don't suppose you have many of those problems camping in the desert, however.

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Another good observation concerning beer vs liquor. I know a guy who only brings Codeine #4s for that exact purpose. He travels light...
While we have found that upping the quality of the liquor we buy reduces the amount of soda needed for mixing (and not to mention the Excedrin for the next morning), packing just Codeine really takes it to a whole 'nother level! I'm not sure I'm that hardcore.



Quote:
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One of my favorite sites for seeing the possibilities is the Expedition Portal site. Here's their section on trailers. The more I look into my trailer project the more I think I might end up building an independent suspension for it with airbags and shocks. The reason is that as I plan out what I want the trailer to do I see the weight can really change from a day trip solo to a four day hell run deep into the Dez with a buddy or two. Leaf springs really fail at that range of weight. Plus the axle is the one thing holding back the travel offroad behind the 4Runner. Ideally, the new trailer will have the same ground clearance as the 4Runner. And as one very wise poster pointed out, ideally the trailer can hold stuff securely without beating it to death via no damping on the suspension.

So I might do the trailer in two stages. I've found alot of interesting information about doing a independent setup and will post soon as I make sense of all of it.

More later...

http://www.expeditionportal.com/foru...ition-Trailers
Great suggestion there. I've been lurking over on ExPo for quite a while now. I've found that the way that group tends to camp is the closest as I've found on the interwebs to the way that I like to camp, except that they get further yet off the beaten path than I do (alas, my tow vehicle is a very large sedan with RWD only). I love how slick some of the dedicated ExPo trailer builds are, the best ones having everything so integrated an accessible. My riding buddies and I have sure refined our system over the years through trial and error, but we dream of the type of setup that some of the ExPo guys have. The biggest problem with most of those rigs is that bike hauling isn't part of the equation for most of them.

I had batted around lots of ideas based around roof-top tents, and even one scheme that involved a service body, Flip-Pac camper shell, and an 18' open deck snowmobile trailer. However, it was lurking on ExPo that helped lead me to discover Jumping Jack trailers, and as I had mentioned previously, I bought a used one a couple months ago. Unfortunately, I've been too busy to use it much lately, but I can show what it does with a few photos grabbed off the internet:



Again, these aren't my photos, but this one really shows off how a Jumping Jack can be loaded. GVWR is about 3000 lbs.

This is how it looks popped up into a tent (very similar to a Springbar) once you're at base camp and unloaded:



Dry weight is about 1200 pounds with the tent stowed, but this thing tows way, way better than that snowmobile trailer does with any kind of load on it (both are Dexter torsion axles), and I used to think the snowmobile trailer didn't tow too badly for what it is.

So far, I've just done a few little overnighters with the kids in backyards and such, and one 2-bike haul for a day-ride. Everything's been going great though, and I've really been satisfied with it. I just wish my schedule would open up enough to do a "real" trip with it before Fall slips away.

The biggest drawback so far to the Jumping Jack is loading and unloading the bikes. The deck they ride on up there is a bit over 3' off the ground. I haven't learned any tricks yet, so it's been similar if slightly more difficult than loading bikes into the box of a full-size pickup, except that you don't have the box sides to work off of.

It's looking like we'll still be using the snowmobile trailer for day trips, and the Jumping Jack for multi-/overnight camping trips. Of course it's the camping trips that require all the extra gear, and I'm hugely excited that I've just made a big step forward in the quality of my base camp setup.







I see barnyard was in this thread. It turns out the last two photos in each of my posts on the first page were from Akeley. The second to last one was off a small approach from the Spur II forest road, just South of where the trail crosses that road to make a tiny loop up to cross the little road that cuts between Spur II and 64. I wouldn't recommend that site, though. The second time we used it, two of us got up (at different times) during the night to stumble out of the tent in our skivvies to take a leak in the dark. The day after we got home, both of us broke out with poison ivy rash on our legs and arms, but thankfully nowhere else!
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Old 09-13-2011, 03:16 PM   #59
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Here is a photo of a Stinger trailer that I use.

The drawbacks- in my opinion, are as follows: 1)It can only haul one bike, 2) It's expensive.

The good- 1) It folds up extremely compact, so it fits in my garage without taking up a lot of room. 2) Super easy to load any kind of bike.

It is built very heavy- good enough for heavy road bikes, such as HD's and GoldWings, so the company claims.





small tires must whine like crazy.
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Old 09-18-2011, 01:39 PM   #60
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If he's married...

He should be easily able to tune out that whining sound.

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small tires must whine like crazy.
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