ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-27-2009, 01:33 AM   #1
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
Cathardic Drift: From Chicago, North and West

This will be my first ride report. It is a story of drifting north and west from Chicago. The nature of this journey is self reflective, as is all journeys that are undertaken alone. To me this is inherently selfish, but I cannot avoid that any longer.

I feel I have lived my whole life in service to others. I have been thinking that perhaps now, I should start living for myself. It is my intent to weave together music, photography, and storytelling into an entirety, using artistry to link together emotion and meaning in an effort to express how I feel. It will be negative, dark, and hopeful all at the same time -- just like real life. It is my wish that you follow along with me in an effort to better understand yourself and this nation we live in.

Be advised that engagement on a personal level will be difficult and I may not respond to questions. The written word bows to no one and nothing, particularly the pretense that it is worth saying. Remember that to me, the greatest conceit is thinking that we, as individuals, are important. By its very nature this ride report is navel gazing at best; self-hatred at worst. An effort at self-understanding is nothing to be proud of. Regardless, you witness this effort; perhaps subscribing, perhaps not. Maybe we can all gain something from it.

I promise nothing beyond details of a trip. Chicago to Northern Wisconsin, then across Minnesota to South Dakota and Wyoming. Hopefully, some will engage me in my both my philosophical and civic thoughts. I am not fun, nor will I ever will be (or so I have convinced myself). I likely drink too much, am prone to moodiness and excessive privacy, am too opinionated despite my open mindedness and willingness to listen and, most significantly of all, am concerned with the feelings of others to the detriment of my own.

Now that that is said, enjoy.

P.S. Anything I reference will be worth viewing/listening. This first one is very important to understand. You'll just have to trust me.

(aside: The girl who stars in the short video is Sofia Coppola)

__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.

Savoir-Faire screwed with this post 02-14-2011 at 11:58 PM Reason: Attempt at embed
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2009, 07:19 AM   #2
GB
Mod Squad
 
GB's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto, ON
Oddometer: 55,850
That's quite the introspective report intro

Looking forward to your ride
__________________
ADV decals, patches & flag? Here
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2009, 05:16 PM   #3
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
Day 1

I am of the opinion that you shouldn't plan a trip too much. A little bit is ok, but if something goes awry you're usually in a spot if you have hotel reservations or a defined destination. Even leaving is indefinite to me. Wait for good weather, launch, achieve escape velocity with a long, fast first day. Then relax for the rest of the trip.

(Aside: there will be excerpts from my trip diary. I will not edit them, except to redact names or insert an implied meaning or reference using brackets)

In the weeks before departure, I made some modifications. New heavyweight fork oil was the most important part. I had purchased a chrome front end and the street glide wheels off eBay the previous winter, and put the new tires on. Unfortunately, when I rebuilt the forks I put the seals in upside down. Take it apart, do it over again, and good as new.

Working on your own stuff is a way toward completeness as a man. I have been thinking more and more how Americans are losing touch with everything. People who work with their hands aren't very respected, it seems. That's funny to me because I meet real estate agents and stock traders and they offer little to society in terms of value, while a plumber and a chairmaker have elaborate, intricate knowledge and are thought of as being unintelligent. Simultaneously, the former think themselves inordinately more important than the latter, and are unafraid to show it.

So August 12th dawned a beautiful day. 70F, clear and sunny. I was already all packed up. Coffee, some oatmeal, a lot of water and then a departure once traffic lightens up.



Yeah, it's a Harley. I can hear the hard-core ADV'ers clicking away now. I'm an unemployed 30 year old student with no debts aside from school loans and the bike. No kids, no wife, no ex-wife, no girlfriend, minimal bills, no fancy electronics and no GPS. I've owned a lot of bikes, but given that I like to tour, this is what I settled on. It really changed the way I ride and I couldn't be happier with it.

Since I live near the loop in Chicago, it's kind of silly to get an early start on a weekday as the routes out of town are inevitably jammed. SO I finished, threw my gear on and headed out at 12 noon into...traffic. Stupid traffic. Even out in Rockford there was construction. Ergh. I'm trying to make it to Hayward, Wisconsin by the end of the day. I shouldn't have a problem, I'm thinking.

The bike has other ideas however. I first noticed a clicking of sorts. Just heard, not felt, but it was rhythmic. Strange. I had but 500+ miles on the bike after doing the suspension work and there were no problems. I put it down to being between concrete jersey barriers and the construction reflecting the sound back to me. No big deal.

On the I-90 tollbooths it is getting progressively worse. A clattering from the transmission is coming on acceleration from a stop. First tollbooth, no good. Second tollbooth, worse. 3rd tollbooth, I get no acceleration and just pull over. Great.

-----Excerpt from trip diary:------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

August 12th, 2009 - 2:15 pm

Not a very auspicious start to this trip. I broke down at the Illinois/Wisconsin border with some transmission / drivetrain problem. I'm fairly sure that it is unrelated to the work I did with the wheels. There is no tension on the rear belt, and the trans is clunking as I try to drive forward. I hope the primary is good and pray it is just the belt that stretched too much and is failing. I don't have the tools to fix it much, so the dealer's tow is en route.

The only good come from this is that it reinforces my bringing food and water even though I believed it unnecessary [for this leg]. If I was roadside instead of at a tollbooth, it would be a lifesaver. At least I was prepared.

-------End excerpt----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As it turned out, the problem was that I had not tightened down my axle nut enough. I followed the torque specs in the service manual, but the mechanics told me in the future to just crank on it more. Nice to know the service manual is inaccurate. Oh well, no crying over spilt milk. I know for the future. The dealership was nice and got me back on the road quick, with minimal charges. The tow was $100 and the fix was $20. Ah well.

I got back on the road after getting towed to Rockford and started north again. I have a rule about not riding after dark, so we'll see how far I get.
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.

Savoir-Faire screwed with this post 09-28-2009 at 02:07 PM
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2009, 02:43 PM   #4
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
-----Excerpt from Trip Diary----------------------------------------------

August 12th, 2009 - 9:26pm

I was able to make up some time and make it to Black River Falls, Wisconsin. I should make Hayward tomorrow around noon if I leave early enough. Thank God it was just the belt adjust that came loose.

As you drift more North, the flat plains of Illinois give way to hillier, more forested land. The corn is no longer in vast endless fields; instead, the smaller plots are fitted in somewhat haphazardly amongst the trees and stony bluffs. Eventually, once far enough North, the heavy hardwoods give way to birch and evergreens giving off a piney haze at sunset.

Walking back from supper in the black that is night in this rural area, I found myself thinking of how urbanized we have become. This nation has forgotten that the rural members of society are still there. All the problems I hear addressed on the national level all have solutions based on urban ideas. Mass transit and anti-gun laws just don't work out here.

That same urbanization has given way to a lot of fear. People are afraid of the outdoors. Even with my experiences I am afraid at times. I feel that people have grown too reliant on one another. That's not necessarily a bad thing; no man is an island. But the urban people mock this rural lifestyle in favor of their fashions and artistic sarcasm. I see it all the time with tourists downtown [in Chicago], but you never see hipsters out in the woods.

Those fur trappers that were here so long ago were hard men. I cannot fathom what that life was like. Such a shame that the only mark of theirs left are the French names of the area. America could use men like that. Everyone has fears, but it seems that as man has changed, so has their fear changed.

-----End excerpt-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.

Savoir-Faire screwed with this post 09-29-2009 at 05:25 PM
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2009, 03:07 PM   #5
clarkebd
Huh?
 
clarkebd's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Cary, NC
Oddometer: 819
Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Savoir-Faire
......
To me this is inherently selfish, but I cannot avoid that any longer.

......

I likely drink too much, am prone to moodiness and excessive privacy, am too opinionated despite my open mindedness and willingness to listen and, most significantly of all, am concerned with the feelings of others to the detriment of my own.
......
Man, that first line hits home with me ... I want to just go away and ride for a month, but can't get myself to do it b/c of people depending on me. Someday I will.

That second paragraph above seems just like me too!

Good luck...hope you find what you are looking for...if you don't think you are looking for something you are kidding yourself.

I'll be following along.
__________________
-brian

98 Moto Guzzi V11 EV - SOLD

If everything seems under control, you're not going fast enough - Mario Andretti
clarkebd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 09:42 PM   #6
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
Later the next day, I made it to my friend's cabins outside Hayward. His family has had them since the 1950's. 3 cabins, a summer home for one uncle and a year round home for another uncle. A dock, canoes, kayaks, and a sand beach on a crystal-clear lake where a world-record Muskie was caught in the 1960's. You can't buy this kind of place anymore.

It's beautiful, peaceful, and quiet. An amazing place and I was lucky to be allowed there. One day, I hope to own some land up there.

The view down the docks:





Sunset off the dock



My friend out on the lake, fishing (obviously) the next day



Two Northern (22" and 26") and a little bluegill snack



Me with the stringer (I did not catch any of them)





No pics of the bikes or cabins though. Thought I took some. Ah well.

-----Begin except from Trip Diary--------------------------------------

August 14th, 2009

I am out on a skiff with [my friend] and his father. They're fishing for Northern Pike and Muskie, respectively, while I am just out to enjoy the breeze [no fishing license]. The weather is clear and warm, with air temp around 80 and water temp a balmy 73.

Earlier I took a bath in the lake and just relaxed. [My friend] and I hunted for chipmunks but found none. He took my bike out for a spin and liked it. Otherwise, not much.

Coming in to the cabins yesterday, my toe shifter loosened up and began to slip. Not good. I managed a quick roadside repair as I was but a short distance from my destination. There always was some play in the toe shifter, but I just put it down to being a Harley. Looks like I was wrong.

[My friend] and I took it apart and there was certainly some wear. Seeing that the heel and toe shifters were identical, we simply swapped their positions and tightened them down. Problem solved. Two problems in two days are two too many. I hope there will be no more.

I am finding it difficult to relax even in this idyllic locale. Lac Court Oreilles and the city of Hayward are so pleasant, but I am struggling regardless. Maybe it is because I know this is not my final destination. The more I think of the remaining trip, the more I think a slow drift west is better than a frenzied, destination minded run.

-----End Excerpt-------------------------------------------------------

I spent about three days there. I feel that any longer and you're overstaying your welcome. More pics and details to come, then the trip will really get going.
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.

Savoir-Faire screwed with this post 02-01-2011 at 10:57 PM Reason: name change
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 10:58 PM   #7
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarkebd
...if you don't think you are looking for something you are kidding yourself.

.
I know I am looking for meaning, which I no longer have. This is what life should be like: hopeful, meaningful, full of friends and dreams. Look at the relationship these three have: closeness, that nebulous quality of beauty, and care. Don't you wish your teenage adventures were this good?




__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.

Savoir-Faire screwed with this post 10-01-2009 at 09:26 AM
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 03:35 PM   #8
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
----- Trip Diary ----------------------------------------------------------

August 14th/15th 2009

Solitude is a fleeting experience; that is, the peace one gains from it is. The late night breeze is blowing south across the lake and into the screened porch tonight, hard enough to set the wind chimes into disordered atonality. The waves are lapping onto shore in a rhythmic sussuration in time with the sawy of the pines. Otherwise, all is quiet.

Does anyone know what peace really is? Can a man be at peace with himself for longer than a moment? I'm not sure. Schopenhauer felt that inner peace could only come after a great ordeal of personal suffering. Is that just when the suffering ends that you no longer know any better?

I ask this as I begin the education goal of becoming a medical doctor, as I feel I have chosen it as an arbitrary goal. It is simply to have something tangible to strive for rather than any great love of medicine. I know if I dedicate myself I can achieve anything; that it is not a matter of "if I can" but rather "if I apply myself". I'd better apply myself, or I'm in trouble.

What is the point of it all if inner peace is so fleeting? Why try if I am incapable of true happiness (as I believe I am). I do no see marriage or children in my future. I have no great drive, just will. Can I apply it to anything other than not failing? It seems I have only been working to "not fail" and that strikes me as a goal that is not legitimate. I love my family, but I doubt I can find lasting happiness through them despite their importance to me.

We live in the United States, where personal achievement is the metric by which we measure a person's contribution to society. To most, that is yearly income. People, myself included, look to wealth to measure everything -- intelligence, quality of character, happiness, you name it. We frequently look at money as having "made it" in some invisible race of phantoms. At the same time, that same money allows freedom to pursue a great family life. Look at [my friend] and his whole family here at the lake in the cabins and homes his grandfather built in the 50's. Poverty is no balm either.

Maybe it is all mindset. Pursuing wealth for your own reasons might be ok. I simply desire the comfort it provides; a security blanket of warmth against a cold night of emptiness. It is another arbitrary goal, but it remains something to fill the days with. That can't be all bad.

----- End Excerpt -----------------------------------------------------
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.

Savoir-Faire screwed with this post 10-02-2009 at 09:09 PM
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2009, 06:45 PM   #9
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
I explored Hayward a little. Behold, the (old) world record muskie!!

(Insert Trumpets Here)



Jeez that's a big fish. 67 some odd pounds?

By the way, if you can catch a new world record Muskie, the Moccasin Bar in Hayward will give you $100,000 for it.

Some other delightful taxidermy:



Which one is Don King?



Ya hey dere, dem are some thursty 'munks, eh?



Sometimes Avery gets thirsty too.



My buddy and his ladyfriend on his beach:




But eventually it all come to an end. After 3 days I knew it was time to move on. I didn't want to intrude on he and his family anymore. It's sort of weird being there when there's some 20+ family members around and you're the only one that's not. Being nigh-continuiously boozed up on various forms of suds might not have helped either, hah! In the 3 days I was there we went through a few cases between me, him and his dad before the wimmenfolk all got in.

My friend has this question, and it's this: If you could choose one song to be your theme song, that would play every time you walk into a room, what would it be? The caveat is you can never change it, so you have to take some time to think about it -- several months in my case. I choose "Love My Way", from the Psychadelic Furs, 1982.

The video is unimportant, but the music is.
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 11:03 PM   #10
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
Again into the void

I departed Hayward and started to head toward the Black Hills Region of South Dakota, heading down Minnesota 23 at a rapid rate in order to make South Dakota in one day.

I found it fitting to put The Very Best of Prince on the CD player. After all, I was in his home state.



Goddamn, "Raspberry Beret" is his greatest song. Not many people know Prince made most of his money not as a performer, but as a songwriter. Oddly enough, his specialty was/is country music. He wrote songs for Dolly Parton, as one example. I'm convinced that "Raspberry Beret" could easily be a country song, but adding a steel guitar and twanging the lyrics. The words are about taking a girl to Old Man Johnson's farm on a motorcycle in order to sleep with her, for crying out loud.

Minnesota is remarkably similar to in geography to Illinois. Rolling farms and corn, corn, corn. The only real differences is no one seems to know how to drive, and there is bridge construction everywhere. Damned detours.

I made the border before nightfall and entered Dakota's plains as the sun began to dip below the horizon.



It's a rest stop. Sorry there's no cool story here. =(



Pretty, isn't it? I'm surprised it looks so good in this shot, because I have a policy of not washing a bike when I am on a trip. By the end of the two weeks, this thing is coated with insect remains.



Takes a while for the sun to go down on this western edge of the Central Time Zone.



Goddamn bugs.

I made it to Mitchell and found a room for the night. Tomorrow I would hit the Badlands and then mosey through to Hulett, Wyoming just a short ride from Devil's Tower.
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2009, 05:55 AM   #11
INOR
Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Oddometer: 28
This ride report just drops off as of October 6th. No subsequent posts. Odd.
INOR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2011, 06:29 PM   #12
Sandslinger
Luv-Husqvarna
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Near the beach
Oddometer: 72
damn i was all into this ride report.
Sandslinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 06:44 PM   #13
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
A chance search wound up having this thread spring up and I had forgotten all about it. School had eaten up all my time and I fell on some hard times for about a year. Back on the horse now. I'll try and finish now that my schedule is much lighter.

Thanks for your interest; it actually means a lot to me. If I didn't see the last two messages, I probably would have just let it lie.
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 08:33 PM   #14
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
So how the heck do people in those nice ride reports manage to take such great photos while on the move? I tried and 9/10's of them come out with photos of my thumb.

Anyways, behold the lure of the open (Interstate-something-or-other) road! After a restful night at the Ramada in Mitchell (nice and clean, great service) I was up at the crack of 10am and on the road.




See? There's that pesky thumb...





I blew this one up a bit larger so you could see the cattle. They're the white things in the distance. It is hard to believe how far you can see. Any sense of perspective is lost when there is little to reference distance against.




It's just so....open.







I had pulled over at a rest stop and walked into the fields. That's where the preceding and following photos were taken. There was a mass grasshopper exodus as you walked through the grass, the hoppers jumping away in a wave. Sort of neat, actually. It reminded me of being aboard a boat in the Philippines...all the flying fish would leap out of the water and skim away when disturbed by the boat as we jetted by.





You know you finally are out west when....








...you can get a bison dog and wash it down with sarsaparilla. Although now you can get a bison dog when you go to Wrigley Field to see the Cubs. The owners of the Cubs apparently own a buffalo/bison ranch (is buffalo the animal and bison the meat, like cow/beef and pig/pork? I have no clue.) and Wrigley is a good outlet for hot dogs. To be honest, I got one and couldn't tell the difference in flavor. They're supposed to be lower in fat so I suppose I'll keep eating them, but if you're eating hot dogs and drinking Pabst in a ballpark you shouldn't really be concerned with fat and/or calories in the first place.

Regardless, I did not buy one when in S.D., and I apologize for the boring and pointless digression.

Where was I headed?




The Badlands really sneak up on you. You see everything around you as in the above photos. Rolling plains stretch out as far as you can see, cattle and who knows what else grazing in the distance. Then you turn a corner, literally, and BAM there's this:










I blew this one up so you could better discern the size of the bird. Looks like a vulture or other raptor of some kind. His wings are too big to be a Red-Tailed Hawk or anything smaller, and I'm pretty sure Bald Eagles don't range here.





It's hard to get a sense of the grandeur of the space unless you're there in person. Here's a panorama:




Everything is so big. I'm used to Chicago's towers, or the cornfields and straight roads outside of town. I've traveled all over the world and everywhere I go I have been able to find something new to appreciate.

It is so easy for people -- especially me -- to get bogged down in the day to day of life. We go to work, we eat a crumby lunch that's likely unhealthy, we go back home, and we do the same thing again the next day. 9 to 5 sucks. Then the weekend comes and we still act like it's 9 to 5. We mow the lawn or watch endless football games on Sunday, gorging on chips and beer like it is what we are supposed to do. Is it? I'm not going to lie, I do that stuff. Well, I don't mow the lawn because I don't have one, and I don't eat chips because I don't keep them in the house, but it's the waste of time that is the thrust of the argument. I do those things; I really do waste my time most days. I spend too much mindless time on the internet, substituting it for real interaction, and that's coming from a guy who finally signed up for that Facebook jazz in 2011.

There, I said it, I waste my time. Admitting you have a problem is the first step to stopping it.


Storm's brewing, by the looks of it.









And then, you roll past the sign on the other side, and just like that you're back to the plains. It's so sudden you could think it was a dream. It's like night and day.





In the same way, the states vary incredibly even when contiguous. The deserts of New Mexico, Arizona, and southern California are all very different despite the geographic continuity. It's the same here. South Dakota's plains grown into hillocks of black pines before crossing the border into Wyoming, where buttes of red rock and scrubby collections of forests dominate. The grazing lands are still present, but not as dominant. The land is tighter, not as spread out. Towns no longer sprawl. They tighten up in a not-uncomfortable way, just more disciplined and "normal" with the buildings of a conventional distance apart; not too close, not too far. There is a finite line between the town and beyond the town that isn't present in South Dakota. It's just...different.













I shut things down in Hulett, Wyoming. The Screaming Eagle Campground was quiet and pleasant with a lot of room. Can't remember how much I paid though.

__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2011, 10:59 PM   #15
Savoir-Faire OP
Powered by Hate
 
Savoir-Faire's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Secret Lair
Oddometer: 861
For being mid-August and relatively low elevation, night was a frosty 45 degrees and raining. I did not pack a sleeping bag as it was so early; instead, I had a poncho liner. Not much, but I always pack a winter hat and that helped. It also rained all night -- joy. Rather than plunge out in the slackening rain, I slept in and waited until 9am to stroll across the street to the feed store for biscuits and gravy paired with scrambled eggs.

Despite my overnight chill, weather overall was great. Most days so far did not get above 80 degrees.




This is Will. Will was taking care of things on the campground for the owner. He was riding his horse back to Minnesota (if I remember correctly) and pleasant to talk to. His horse was a retired quarter horse and I wish I could recall more. He was generous, easygoing and living a life incredibly different from anything I've ever done. Few people in this world with his attitude about life. I was glad to have made his acquaintance.





Pretty horse. He had told me a lot about it...breed, where it was from, history...I can't remember much of it, sadly. Should have written more down. I had never seen a horse with blue eyes before either; didn't know that was possible.

Devils Tower was a short 6 miles away. The high today would only rise to 62 degrees and patchy storms were moving through the area (including a deluge that was tough enough to make me pull over and end the day early -- but that's later)

Lots more red rock now that we're in Wyoming.




Got come cool shots on my way up to Devils Tower. No retouching here; I just happened to get the timing perfectly. Lives up to its name.






Getting closer, you see the stripe-like texture of what looks like a solid rock from a distance.







In this photo, you can see the boulders at the base....




...but you don't get any sense of their size until there are people amongst them. They are huge!




The Indians bring scraps of cloth and wrap them about the trees, containing their prayers in talisman form.







Other views. I like the terrain here. Forested but still slightly open.












Rain made we stop, but not for the day. That would happen later. I took the opportunity to have lunch and warm up. I have no insulating layer in my jacket; it's just a shell.






----Excerpt from trip diary:--------------------------------------------

You catch glimpses of the big monolith on the way up, but once you are up close you can see why it was the first National Landmark in the nation. Sacred to the Indians, Devils Tower to them was the base of a colossal tree clawed into its current form by an equally colossal bear. Today, we know it as the core of an ancient volcano exposed through the forces of wind and water erosion. What a sight to behold -- simultaneously natural and unnatural in appearance, the rock juts vertically into the sky, seemingly pushed straight out from the earth while shedding boulders into a huge pile at its base. The menacing skies overhead were fitting for the setting.

I rode back to Hulett and started the scenic route to the Black Hills, passing Alma and Aladdin as well as the point where Custer began his expedition that would prove his undoing. Next came Belle Fourche and Spearfish, which was the nicest city I have seen so far in South Dakota. In the distance through the intermittent rain were the Black Hills.

They certainly deserve the name. Covered with a thick curtain of pines, the trees at a distance make the entire surface they cover dark as night. The road led straight to Spearfish Canyon and ran the length of it, twisting through the pale tan walls of rock and deep-green pines. The road followed a rocky stream across the canyon floor, with occasional fly fishermen and roadside cabins.

I'm holed up [in Cheyenne Crossing, SD] waiting the rain, but will leave momentarily. I plan to make Custer tonight and see the Mount Rushmore Monument tomorrow.

-------End excerpt-----------------------------------------------------


After lunch, I wind pass Lead and wind up in Deadwood. Interesting place that made me think a lot. More to come soon.
__________________
The best bike to take a trip on is the one you have.
Savoir-Faire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014