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Old 12-29-2011, 10:55 AM   #1216
Roadracer_Al
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I can intentionally activate the slipper on pavement --- specifically, riding it like a SuMo, i.e. shifting down 2 gears at once, and dropping the clutch. I find that so completely un-intuitive that even when I'm trying to do it, my brain goes on automatic about half the time and rev-matches with the throttle.

Now that you mention it, the clutch *does* have a very light pull. I had attributed that to the hydraulics, not the slipper. Doesn't the Rekluse also use flyweights that lock up harder at higher RPM?
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:23 PM   #1217
Seth S
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadracer_Al View Post
I can intentionally activate the slipper on pavement --- specifically, riding it like a SuMo, i.e. shifting down 2 gears at once, and dropping the clutch. I find that so completely un-intuitive that even when I'm trying to do it, my brain goes on automatic about half the time and rev-matches with the throttle.

Now that you mention it, the clutch *does* have a very light pull. I had attributed that to the hydraulics, not the slipper. Doesn't the Rekluse also use flyweights that lock up harder at higher RPM?


the Rekluse uses metal balls that act as weights and as the clutch spins up they travel outwards along slots and lock the clutch plates together. The clutches comes with 2 different types of metal balls...one is heavier than the other. If you want faster lockup you run the heavier balls. There are also two different sets of springs for tuning the preload.
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:37 PM   #1218
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If you want faster lockup you run the heavier balls.
Words to live by there!
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Old 12-29-2011, 02:17 PM   #1219
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Words to live by there!
I know I said balls

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Old 12-29-2011, 09:03 PM   #1220
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:28 PM   #1221
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Since we're on the topic of the slipper clutch, one thing I've found is that if descending really steep rocky terrain with the bike engine off and using the clutch as a rear brake, the thing would not brake worth a darn and kept bump starting. I haven't had this issue with other bikes so presume it has to do with the slipper. Curious what the experts think.

Yeah, I know, I should have pinned and prayed but I suck.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:39 AM   #1222
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I am surprised that you guys don't notice the slipper working. I find it works a treat , particularly on steep downhills where the rear won' lock under compression. Or just banging it down a couple coming into a dirt corner.

Am I imagining this?
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:35 AM   #1223
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I am surprised that you guys don't notice the slipper working. I find it works a treat , particularly on steep downhills where the rear won' lock under compression. Or just banging it down a couple coming into a dirt corner.

Am I imagining this?
Nope, I am with you on this one.
Try riding a bike without a slipper clutch, it almost ended badly for me.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:55 AM   #1224
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Nope, I am with you on this one.
Try riding a bike without a slipper clutch, it almost ended badly for me.
Explain.
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Old 12-30-2011, 05:54 AM   #1225
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oz-Strom View Post
I am surprised that you guys don't notice the slipper working. I find it works a treat , particularly on steep downhills where the rear won' lock under compression. Or just banging it down a couple coming into a dirt corner.

Am I imagining this?
I've slid the rear wheel most of the way down steep hills and never had any indication that the slipper was working. I've also locked the rear brake and killed the motor at speed and couldn't get enough traction to re-start...Maybe the dirt in your part of the world has better traction,...
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:58 AM   #1226
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Basically the slipper clutch limits the torque that can go back into the engine. On my SMC on pavement I've noticed that the slipper keeps the RPM's at about 6k to 6.5k no matter how many gears you downshift. It will keep it there till the wheel speed meets the engine speed. And it feels like a nice constant, smooth engine braking. On pavement it will not break traction on it's own, I need to be heavy on the front brake to get a slide.

I really don't see how the slipper clutch would come into the right conditions to work correctly off road unless you were going full motocross speeds or maybe for a split second when landing jumps. There just isn't enough traction to put torque back through the clutch, the rear wheel slides before that happens
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:11 AM   #1227
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Basically the slipper clutch limits the torque that can go back into the engine. On my SMC on pavement I've noticed that the slipper keeps the RPM's at about 6k to 6.5k no matter how many gears you downshift. It will keep it there till the wheel speed meets the engine speed. And it feels like a nice constant, smooth engine braking. On pavement it will not break traction on it's own, I need to be heavy on the front brake to get a slide.

I really don't see how the slipper clutch would come into the right conditions to work correctly off road unless you were going full motocross speeds or maybe for a split second when landing jumps. There just isn't enough traction to put torque back through the clutch, the rear wheel slides before that happens
That was my take on the slipper clutch...I've put close to 10,000 miles on my 08 690E and it's always acted like a conventional clutch off-road
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:56 AM   #1228
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My experience as well.

It makes complete sense for KTM to equip the bike with one since there is no penalty for off-road use (other than preventing the aftermarket from supplying a twist-n-go clutch) and the motor is also used in a factory SM bike.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:46 PM   #1229
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Originally Posted by .chris View Post
Nope, I am with you on this one.
Try riding a bike without a slipper clutch, it almost ended badly for me.
what did you ride before slipper clutches were invented?
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:50 PM   #1230
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You read Esquire Seth ???

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