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Old 09-16-2011, 07:20 PM   #16
NJ-Brett
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Funny, I leave the front wheel centered unless I have to use the lock, which I almost never do.
40 years and I never had one fall over except once when the sidestand was not all the way down.
The bike fell over 2 minutes after I got off it....
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Old 09-17-2011, 03:56 AM   #17
orangebear
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if its on the center stand then its full lock to the left as that way the bars sit .
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Old 09-18-2011, 08:28 AM   #18
markk53
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Never bothered thinking about it and won't start... except when the direction it is turned will contribute to it not tipping over (frequently an issue off road when ya gotta take a pee).
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Old 09-18-2011, 10:02 AM   #19
PT Rider
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The bike is on its three points of contact, the side stand, the rear tire contact patch, and the front tire contact patch. Turning the front wheel to the left moves its contact patch so the bike leans more to the left with more weight on the sidestand and is more stable. This is important on some bikes, less important on other bikes, and more important on right-sloping ground, in wind, etc.
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Old 09-19-2011, 05:46 PM   #20
SiouxsieCat
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When on the side stand, I lock the bars turned left.
When on the center stand, I lock them turned right.
When stopped and sitting, they're pretty much pointed straight ahead.
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Old 09-19-2011, 08:18 PM   #21
Onederer
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I turn mine foward.

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Old 09-20-2011, 05:20 AM   #22
sleak
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IIt depends...

On side stand, locked to the right. The "experts" say to the left, but the instructor at the BMW training center showed how it sits a bit lower, and therefore more stable, to the right. I think higher/lower depends on fork geometry.

On center stand, locked in whichever direction gets the bars out of the way best, depending on where it's parked.
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Old 09-20-2011, 06:54 AM   #23
otto
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Unless you're a Hand-Wringer and feel the need to use the lock, why bother turning the wheel? I've been parking mine with the wheel straight since '66. I've never had one fall over, even the overloaded GS. I don't think I've ever put a key into a fork lock.
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:35 AM   #24
rivercreep
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When I'm parked it's always to the left so I can use the steering lock (and my cable and my alarm system) because I live where they'd steal a turd on the sidewalk.
When stoped, I usually have my bars/front wheel aimed at my escape route should someone forget to use their brakes as they're comming up on me from behind.
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:44 AM   #25
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post
Unless you're a Hand-Wringer and feel the need to use the lock, why bother turning the wheel? I've been parking mine with the wheel straight since '66. .
You must ride ugly and undesirable bikes. For those who bikes that others want it is smart to lock the bars so the asshat thieves can't push it around the corner and throw in it a truck.

It won't stop them all but why make it easy for them?

Any time my bikes are out of my sight the steering is locked.
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:52 AM   #26
basketcase
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Well it depends... At the bottom line the whole thing is situational for me.

- Parked someplace in public and left unattended -- full left and locked.

- Parked anyplace else when out riding -- usually straight ahead if on asphalt. Bur when out in the dirt, however it feels most stable.

- Refueling -- full lock right.

- Parked in the garage at home -- straight ahead, or maybe full lock left, or maybe full lock right, depending on how I'm moving around in the available space.
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Old 09-20-2011, 08:00 AM   #27
IheartmyNx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
You must ride ugly and undesirable bikes.

And you must live around some pretty inept thieves... B/c a steering lock of a bike, and I'll go as far to even say most, are easy to break.

Tho it is a steering lock AND a caliper lock for me... most the time. I even want to run a Master through the rear sprocket & chain, so in order to move the bike it'd have to be picked up the entire way...


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Old 09-20-2011, 01:31 PM   #28
larryboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post
Unless you're a Hand-Wringer and feel the need to use the lock, why bother turning the wheel? I've been parking mine with the wheel straight since '66. I've never had one fall over, even the overloaded GS. I don't think I've ever put a key into a fork lock.

I used to leave the wheel straight and just about threw a nice street bike on the ground when the kickstand started sinking into the gravel, the wheel flopped left and I barely got back to it in time.

I don't use fork locks, take it..I have more bikes.

Really paid off at work the other day, one of those mobile car washing outfits was going to wash a truck right next to the bike parking at work...you know, the kind that uses acid as the cleaning agent and dulls aluminum and paint. Security guard to the rescue, he moved 30 bikes that weren't locked, mine included!!
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Old 04-28-2013, 10:26 AM   #29
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Bringing it back from the dead.

I was taught at the BMW riding school to have handlebars to left and right to mount and dismount so that is where I leave mine unless I actually lock the bars to the left.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:28 PM   #30
ttpete
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryboy View Post
I used to leave the wheel straight and just about threw a nice street bike on the ground when the kickstand started sinking into the gravel, the wheel flopped left and I barely got back to it in time.

I don't use fork locks, take it..I have more bikes.

Really paid off at work the other day, one of those mobile car washing outfits was going to wash a truck right next to the bike parking at work...you know, the kind that uses acid as the cleaning agent and dulls aluminum and paint. Security guard to the rescue, he moved 30 bikes that weren't locked, mine included!!
Why worry? After all, you have more bikes...............
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