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Old 11-03-2011, 07:19 AM   #16
robberst OP
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Phil
I've spent a fair amount of time perusing your website. Thanks for the effort of compiling that. The places to find much information on the interweb are few. My pile of scrap looks a lot like some of your bikes


I started splitting the cases last night. The crankshaft doesn't want to slide out of the primary side ball bearing, but I will be persistent.
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:36 PM   #17
tried-them-all
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you can buy them direct from the manufacturer...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALvis? View Post
That looks like a 1958 Indian Trailblazer, fore runner in the line up of the RE Indian Chief.
Hitchcock's carries a few Indian items like tank badges and RE Indian front fender Indian head. It was different than the Springfield Indian head.
http://www.hitchcocksmotorcycles.com/home
hitchcock's buy all those parts from me: www.re-indian.com. If you want info look no further.
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:53 PM   #18
tried-them-all
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robberst View Post
Phil
I've spent a fair amount of time perusing your website. Thanks for the effort of compiling that. The places to find much information on the interweb are few. My pile of scrap looks a lot like some of your bikes


I started splitting the cases last night. The crankshaft doesn't want to slide out of the primary side ball bearing, but I will be persistent.
scrap is the way to go!..well, the pictures are out of date - i have a line up of 14 half restored bikes now.

heat is your friend - don't take to enfields with hammers - everything bends easily.
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Old 11-03-2011, 04:17 PM   #19
caponerd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robberst View Post
Anyone know off the top of their head if the big nut for the primary sprocket on the crankshaft is whitworth?
Mine was badly mangled from someone trying to get it off with a chisel and hammer. I tried a 2 inch wrench, but ended up getting it off with a pipe wrench.

The crankshaft is spins freely now. The pistons were seized up on the pins and the pins in the rod. next up, split the cases.
I have a big american sized socket that I use to turn those nuts. If I think about it next time I'm in the garage, I'll check the size. (might be 1-7/8")

Be very careful when you take the cases apart. Those two bolts in the left side of the crankcase just above the cam tunnels have to be removed so you can get at two "cheese headed" screws that join the case halves between the cylinder spigots.
If you don't know about them, you'll be prying forever with no luck, and probably some irreperable damage.
It's safe to pry wherever there are bolt lugs.
The timing side bearing is a roller, and should come apart, leaving the crankshaft in the left side case half, which has a ball bearing which the crankshaft tightly fitted to.
There's a special tool which bolts to the right case half to push the crankshaft out of the ball bearing, but if the bearing is shot anyway, I've had good luck drilling the rivets out of the ball retainer, and moving all the balls to one side of the bearing so they fall out. Once you have it apart, the races can be extracted with conventional pullers.

There are three holes in the timing side case, which you can extend a thin punch into, to drift the timing side outer race out with. Locate the three peen marks on the inside which prevent the outer race from coming loose, and grind them down with a small rotary file (dremel tool) before you attempt to drive the race out of the case half.
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Old 11-04-2011, 03:14 PM   #20
robberst OP
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I'm pretty careful with the hammers, I'm a small aircraft mechanic and take apart lots of EXPENSIVE, soft, thin crankcases. A second go at it and the cases came apart with relative ease. I spent a couple hours and made pullers for the case halves out of wood and studs and a few wood wedges. The dremel tool file worked great and the main bearings are removed.



The left case half has had a hole punched in the oil tank, and a weld repair. (the shiny area with burnt edges) It's a strange spot for a hole, between the oil tank and transmission.

Anyhow a couple silly questions for you experts, (phil, caponerd) The timing spocket on the crank will not budge.......the parts list at hitchcocks shows a pin, but it just looks keyed to me. Also, how are the cam followers installed or removed? Sorry for the dumb questions, I haven't bought a manual yet, and I'm too impatient to wait, but on the other hand it brings up a point. This ADVrider forum is great! Where else can you find info like this? It's been my oracle for bike repair. I live in a remote area and know no one with similar interests in motorcycles. Just a tip of the hat to you all.

robberst screwed with this post 03-23-2013 at 10:35 AM Reason: I'm an idiot
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Old 11-04-2011, 04:37 PM   #21
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I got on a tangent there and forgot to ask my second question.

My connecting rod small ends do not have bushings. The aluminum is just milled and reamed. Is this normal? The Hitchcock parts list shows a bushing.
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:46 PM   #22
caponerd
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The timing sprocket on the crankshaft will yield to a proper sprocket puller. I borrow one from a friend who maintains a variety of engines, from cars and trucks down to garden equipment. The one I've used has three claws on it that are tightened onto the sprocket with a kind of conical fitting that screwed down over the arms of the claws to force them to stay under the sprocket. I think even harbor frieght has one that will work.
Sometimes, you have to apply a good amount of pressure then tap it with a brass hammer to make it pop off its taper.

I've never seen a small end bush. I've got several sets of rods out in my garage, and none of them have bushings.

The big ends have replaceable plain bearing shells, available in two sizes beyond standard to allow up to two regrinds.
I've heard that the timing side rod journal is ground .0005" tighter (larger) than the drive side to help prevent oil pressure loss on the drive side as the bearings wear with use.
On the unmolested engines I've looked at, the timing side rod does feel tighter. However, when I had my Interceptor crank reground years ago, I was unaware of this, and the crankshaft guy didn't mention it, so I assume both journals were ground the same size, and no ill effect has ensued after all these years. You're probably safe if you change the oil regularly.
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:09 AM   #23
robberst OP
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Not much new to report. Everything is apart on the original (seized) motor. Just been working on cleaning parts and making making up a list of required parts.
My Lucas SR2 magnetos are in tough shape. The secondary coils are open. Anyone know of a source for parts. Hitchcocks has most of the parts, but no coils.
Also I'd like to keep one original and ideally i'd like to fit an electronic ignition into the other. I see kits for sale to do this for other lucas mags, but not the sr2.
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Old 11-09-2011, 08:25 AM   #24
caponerd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robberst View Post
Not much new to report. Everything is apart on the original (seized) motor. Just been working on cleaning parts and making making up a list of required parts.
My Lucas SR2 magnetos are in tough shape. The secondary coils are open. Anyone know of a source for parts. Hitchcocks has most of the parts, but no coils.
Also I'd like to keep one original and ideally i'd like to fit an electronic ignition into the other. I see kits for sale to do this for other lucas mags, but not the sr2.
Lucas mags are rebuildable. (in spite of the bad rap, at least Lucas equipment isn't throw away junk like modern black boxes)
There's a guy who rewinds Lucas mag coils. Don't remember his name, but I think he's a member of britbike.com, and possibly that Royal Enfield forum I gave you a link to.
He might also be on the yahoo list. For sure, someone on one of those three resources can put you in touch with him.
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Old 11-10-2011, 03:47 AM   #25
qiuliumsmith
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After having the look of all those anime and photos or we can say all those anime and photos couldn't satisfied me till yet i'm still saying "The Scrap Metal Was Not An Indian".
blood sugar monitor

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Old 11-12-2011, 03:24 PM   #26
robberst OP
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I'm not sure exactly what that last post means, but I suppose, "the scrap metal was a royal enfield"

Anyhow

I've been working a little here and there on my projects. I employed the use of the parts "dishwasher" at work and cleaned up most of my parts. Under the grime and goo were a couple surprises.



I'm thinking the drive chain must have broken at some point. The case was broken in the oil tank, then a weld repair was made.

Today I disassembled the spare engine and split the cases. Here's what I found.



lots of metal in the bottom of the cases. The connecting rod on the right is very bent and left lots of metal on the crank journal. Still seeing a few differences in the two engines. this engine does not have shell or babbitt type bearings. Just the aluminum rod directly on the crank. Also, the oil return pipes are different.

Oh, one other thing.......Is there any difference between exhaust and intake cams? Both camshafts are stamped "ex" on the engine that doesn't have to have the cases split to remove them.

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Old 11-25-2011, 11:18 AM   #27
robberst OP
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Well I've been traveling for work, and busy with other stuff lately. Might be a while before I get back to the Enfield.
I also have my alfa romeo engine competely tore down and it's a bit higher priority.
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Old 11-27-2012, 02:35 PM   #28
robberst OP
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hrmmmphh
I see it's been just over a year since I said anything. there isn't much to say. I've done very little beside cleaning up pieces, painting and collecting/fabricating parts. I'm nowhere near putting it back together yet. the cylinders and heads are at the local engine machine shop.

My question for today

What is the yellow coating inside the cases? I would guess it's some sort of sealant. I have to remove it all because it's flaking off, but should I replace it and what with?


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Old 11-28-2012, 12:43 PM   #29
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If I had to guess, that yellow stuff is "glyptal" (spelling?) it used to be used to coat the inside of cast crankcases etc. It would seal porous castings to keep them from seeping oil. Hot rod engine builders used it also so the oil would run down the crankcase walls faster to the sump or pan. It's still available and works as well as it ever did. It's probably one of the first "miracle" coatings developed maybe in the 40's?
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:51 PM   #30
Tosh Togo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garbln View Post
If I had to guess, that yellow stuff is "glyptal" (spelling?) it used to be used to coat the inside of cast crankcases etc. It would seal porous castings to keep them from seeping oil. Hot rod engine builders used it also so the oil would run down the crankcase walls faster to the sump or pan. It's still available and works as well as it ever did. It's probably one of the first "miracle" coatings developed maybe in the 40's?
Ding ding ding... we have a winner!. http://www.eastwood.com/glyptal-red-brush-on-1-qt.html

The rest of the thread's just as good.
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