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Old 02-03-2013, 02:40 PM   #151
richarddacat
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I never owned a bad bike or one that left me stranded but a friend had a HD 125 Rapido. This bike was absolute junk, hardly a day went by without it dying or breaking. I had a CT70 at the time and remember towing him more than once. He later bought a SL125 and we threw the HD into a bon-fire.
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:42 PM   #152
fhowell55
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couple of nominees as mentioned

1) someone was wondering about "a honda with a hi-low transmission".
That would be the Honda CB 900 Custom (produced 2 years, iirc 81-82)
and the CB 1000 Custom in 83). They were most definately NOT
deserving of any Worst List. awesome bikes, shaft drive, classic retro
styling, and nice performance. The only thing i personally didn't like about
them is the dominant color of the run was brown... although the blue and the
black versions looked great.

2) also nominated was the Yamaha TX 750. looked just like the SX 650's of the day.
first commenter hit the nail on the head, the counterbalanced twin should've been
a revolutionary step forward for vertical twins, but disintegrating engines overshadowed
the issue. the 1st year edition had one major problem that doomed the TX 750
. their problem was that the first year-model's oil sump was
too shallow, and the engine crank /counterbalancer would whip up
the oil into a froth- thus preventing the oil pump from working properly. In spite
of the fact that Yamaha addressed the problem in the 2nd model year,
by simply revising the oil pan /sump on the bottom of the engine. even so, the
public stayed away in droves, and the model died.
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Old 02-03-2013, 04:08 PM   #153
concours
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Bash all you want, but I'd ride her coast to coast tomorrow if I could
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:06 PM   #154
Schlug
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ibafran View Post
Mechanically, there have been some real losers. And style-wise its hard to pick out something truly awful.

I nominate the Honda 150cc Benley Touring. Yes, the motor was a little jewel. Near zero torque, but 16hp at 10.5k revs. And it had a fully enclosed drive chain that couldnt be beat. The seat had real springs and was surprisingly comfortable for its day.

The solid footpegs and cruddy rear suspension had the hard bits and mufflers dragging with very little lean angle. The leading link front suspension was controlled by fat rubber donuts. The kind of rubber donuts usually seen supporting modern cage exhaust systems. There were no hydraulics or any other mechanical help for the rubber donuts. The throttle cable was internal at the twistgrip and exited the bar at the first bend. When the bike fell on the throttle side, the bar would fold at the throttle cable hole every time.

Style-wise it was ugly everywhere. The front fender was sort of square with a flip at the trailing edge. The forks were stampings welded at the joining seams. The frame was the same stamping welded up. No amount of paint could make this bike look good. The rear fender sort of matched the front with a flare at the trailing edge. Square plastic rear shock covers did not look out of place on this bike. Like the seat and the chain cover, the fenders actually worked well at keeping the filth from the tires off the bike and rider.

In lots of ways, it was a really good bike. But in lots of other ways it was the worst. It could never overcome its flaws. The tubed frame 160cc bike was much better looking and sold well, comparatively.






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Old 02-03-2013, 08:21 PM   #155
Schlug
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Originally Posted by Racer111v View Post
Maybe not the worst ever, but the worst I ever owned. The clutch basket bushing was a steel bushing, not a bearing. It would seize solid on the starting gate and ram the bike into the gate with the clutch lever still pulled in. After many updates you still had to wait until the last second to put it in gear.
The rear suspension geometry was screwed up. The shock shaft would snap off and pitch you over the bars. I broke the stock shock on both bikes, and a Fox shock three times on the 450. I disassembled the 450 at the end of the year and threw it away in pieces. I hated that bike so much, and couldn't sell it to any one with a clear conscience.
great story!
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:05 PM   #156
davidji
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Originally Posted by concours View Post
Bash all you want, but I'd ride her coast to coast tomorrow if I could
I'd love to have one of those in good shape.

Disappointed to see the Yamaha TX500/XS500 so prominent in the discussion. I thought those were different designations for the same bike--at least in model years where both were produced, like the model year for mine, '75. I think the next year had some changes and only retained the XS designation?

I guess if the reliability of a ground breaking bike is poor maybe it deserves to be here. But I sure enjoyed riding my 500 (XS, TX or whichever it was) more than some others UJMs of the era.

48hp from an aircooled 500 twin was pretty good for the day.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:58 PM   #157
PeterW
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Bash all you want, but I'd ride her coast to coast tomorrow if I could
Had one of those, it's the only bike that ever died on me on the road :)

It had some good points, like the starter-motor and generator using the same windings but overall the worst bike I ever owned.

Pete
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Old 02-04-2013, 05:41 AM   #158
Rockmuncher
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1980 Harley FLT

I had a 1980 HD FLT. Worst bike ever. Bought it with 5000 miles on it {should have been a sign} and blew a head gasket right away. When it was running, which wasn't often, the best you could do was 80 mph. When you went around a corner, it had so much flex that it felt like you were riding a sideways spring. It had an enclosed oil bath final chain drive that was a cluster fuck to do anything with. When I bought it, I was a die hard Harley guy, when I sold it I swore I would never have another. The only way it could have been worse is if.............sorry, I can't imagine how it could have been worse.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:34 PM   #159
concours
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"
It had some good points, like the starter-motor and generator using the same windings but overall the worst bike I ever owned.

Pete "
Nope, conventioanl starter motor in front of the jugs, conventional stator on the left end of the crank.



"Disappointed to see the Yamaha TX500/XS500 so prominent in the discussion. I thought those were different designations for the same bike--at least in model years where both were produced, like the model year for mine, '75. I think the next year had some changes and only retained the XS designation?

I guess if the reliability of a ground breaking bike is poor maybe it deserves to be here. But I sure enjoyed riding my 500 (XS, TX or whichever it was) more than some others UJMs of the era."


The model designation was funky for the rest of the line-up. The XS was the 650 only... until 1973, the TX750 was rolled out and ALL four stroke street bikes became TX's, even the legendary 650. Then, when the TX750 was ajudged a steaming turd, they went BACK to the XS moniker, including the XS650 and ALL four stroke street bikes after. The TX750 was Debuted in 1973, halfway through '74 they pulled the plug.
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Old 02-05-2013, 12:12 AM   #160
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Originally Posted by concours View Post
Bash all you want, but I'd ride her coast to coast tomorrow if I could
I had the XS 650, while it was reliable, the handling wasn't anything to write home about. I had a Norton 850, right after the Yamaha, no flexing of frame there, beautifull bike to ride, too good in fact, lost my license couple of times, due speeding, on the Commando
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Old 02-05-2013, 11:53 AM   #161
markjenn
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Maybe I'm being British-bike harsh here, but I'd bet the overall reliability of even the ill-fated TX750 was better than the Commandos, especially the later-model 850s.

Also nitpicking, but the TX500 twins really weren't UJM's which are generally defined as Japanese four-cylinder standards, not twins. And while the TX500's did have problems, they weren't fundamentally flawed like the 750 was.

Mid-70's was a rough period for Yamaha streetbikes as it transitioned from two-strokes to four-strokes. They completely missed the trend towards four-cylinders until finally catching the program in the late-70's with the XS-Eleven (which had its share of issues too, mainly chassis).

These sorts of lists have to include the Suzuki Madura:



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markjenn screwed with this post 02-05-2013 at 12:00 PM
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Old 02-05-2013, 01:04 PM   #162
rbrsddn
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I had a '74 T150 Triumph Trident, that had a single plate clutch that rode on a disc of needle bearings when disengaged. That bearing destroyed itself twice in the 20,000 miles I put on it. Both times over 100 miles from home. I loved that bike though.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:45 AM   #163
K88
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The Amazonas. Game over

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray of Sunshine View Post
Nope, the Brazilian bike (home of shitty bikes and hot women) was the Amazonas. Amazingly, this turd was only built to order. Powered by a very easy to get VW flat four.
I have to agree - it's the Amazonas. No worst bike can come close - not that I've ever ridden one, but why not put an air-cooled VW Beetle engine and gearbox (including reverse) into a (crappy) motorcycle frame?

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Old 02-06-2013, 04:26 AM   #164
DC2wheels
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Now that it has morphed into a worst and best MC thread.

My first bike was a '77 XS500D. Never had a problem. Even raced it in ModProd class of AAMRR.

Eventually it ended up looking like this- then (stupid, I know) I sold it.

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Old 02-06-2013, 04:26 AM   #165
Tuna Helper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RT jim View Post
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
Honda had an automatic 750 around then.
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When I was growing up we didn't wear seatbelts, bicycle helmets, and didn't have nerf playgrounds. We learned that stupid hurts at a young age. How did we survive without the nanny state?
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When I was a kid you probably would have gotten beaten up for showing up with a helmet.
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