ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 25 votes, 4.80 average. Display Modes
Old 11-01-2011, 08:52 AM   #16
anotherguy
Beastly Adventurer
 
anotherguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: the hills
Oddometer: 5,908
I don't bushwhack so a long blade doesn't suit me. I have two blades. One is a garden variety 6 inch survival type w/hollow metal handle and the other is a 4" clip point I made from a Rigid kit my parents gave me for my 16th birthday. They are very different blades but either will do what I need.

I have a pocket chainsaw for backcountry big work. I don't like using small axes or carrying them. If I'm going to stay for awhile a large axe is what I'd want. As well as a sledge w/a wedge for splitting. I realize that's a bit beyond instant need but if the shit really hit the fan you'll need bigger tools to be comfortable. And isn't that what we all want?

The biggest thing I'd miss would be coffee and a good cigar.
__________________
A lie has no feet......it can't stand alone.............
Jason Newsted
anotherguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:09 AM   #17
Grreatdog
Beastly Adventurer
 
Grreatdog's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Annapolis, MD
Oddometer: 9,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithy View Post
...But what makes a good bushcraft knife? Size? Shape? Mass?....
For me, a regular knife doesn't cut it because, unlike hikers and campers, I don't have options about my route. I am generally trying to get somewhere specific regardless of conditions. So I need a tool that can actually cut brush and small trees. Plus I want it to dig holes and chop through frozen ground so I don't have to carry an entrenching tool.

So, to me, it is mass that matters most in a bush knife. Size just makes them easier or harder to carry unless you are actually clearing brush where long matters. The machete in my picture is past its useful life because about half the original mass has been sharpened away. So it doesn't have the mass for cutting small trees or digging anymore.

But the machete is, quite literally, razor sharp. So I still carry it when I know that vines and briars are the order of the day. Otherwise I generally carry the Woodman Pal for most recon work. It makes a good shovel (something I need a lot), a decent hatchet, will still work as a knife (now that I did away with the factory edge) and it carries very well.

I have really come to like that tool.
__________________
640E, MXC200, XT200
Grreatdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:14 AM   #18
Sniper X
De Oppresso Liber
 
Sniper X's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Central New Mexico, 7420ft above sea level
Oddometer: 33,290
For me, a knife the size of the Hooligan, and a small axe or hawk fit the bill nicely for all chores where more mass than a regular size sheath knife larger than about a 5in blade are needed. In fact, I have gone from 6in sheath to smaller 5in or even a 3.5in sheath for a knife on my belt for camping and hunting. I either carry a ESEE 3 or a Buck Pathfinder for a handy sheath knife, plus the hooligan and such when needed.
__________________
" The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything."
Straight Out Da Trailah!
Sniper X is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:31 AM   #19
KingRat
Stroppy.
 
KingRat's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: a citizen of the world
Oddometer: 24,961
tons of 'Ray Mears' stuff on the interweb



http://www.youtube.com/user/RayMearsBushcraft





__________________
.
.

"Discourage self-help, and loyal subjects become the slaves of ruffians." - A. V. Dicey
"The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools." - Herbert Spencer
"Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people's money." - Margaret Thatcher
KingRat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:35 AM   #20
Askel
Perma-n00b
 
Askel's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Da UP, eh.
Oddometer: 10,450
It's easy to get wrapped up in the "shiny things" aspect of this, but it's important to remember it's not bushcheckoutwhatigotfromcabellas, but bushcraft.

It's a skill. You gotta study, practice, refine.

Best thing I found is hanging out with people who spend a lot more time in the woods than me. You can learn a lot of really cool stuff from other people.

For me though, it's more than just some last ditch survival method. It's about traveling and living comfortably in the woods. Lugging a fucking axe everywhere I go is not comfortable.
Askel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:39 AM   #21
AlanCT
The Byronic Man
 
AlanCT's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Northeastern CT
Oddometer: 3,297
My favorite outdoor edged tool lately is the Condor golok. It is stout and thick enough to hack through wrist-thick trees and to split firewood. It would also harvest up a big pile of pine boughs quickly for insulation, if needed. I've been using it a lot the past couple of days to clean up after our latest weather apocalypse here. I admit to being pretty incompetent with a hatchet, and I seem to handle the golok better.

My other constant companion is a Victorinox Spirit multitool. I like to have it in the woods not only for repairing or maintaining my stuff, but because there is plenty of manmade stuff lying around out there (in my area, anyway), that could be salvaged or adapted for use in an emergency. In my teens, a friend and I made a hut out of the hoods removed from a bunch of junked cars out in the woods and weathered out an overnight rainstorm.

For a sheath knife, I don't have one steady companion. I favor smaller knives with about a 4" blade - if it is paired with a bigger chopping tool. I sometimes grab a Mora 510, but I also have a nice custom Nessmuk that is a pleasure to use and great for working with food. I have a Helle knife with the most comfortable handle I've ever encountered, but the tang is a tad loose in it so I don't entirely trust it. I also recently acquired a Tops Shango, and I am still trying to decide if I like it.


As for bushcraft skills, I have been working off and on with the bow drill for the past couple of months. No success yet.
__________________
"You wouldn't be riding a motorcycle if you weren't an optimist."
- Matthew Crawford
2005 Ural Tourist, 2000 Kawasaki W650
IBA #23064
AlanCT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:49 AM   #22
RedRocker
Native Texican
 
RedRocker's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: N.Texas
Oddometer: 5,345
__________________
N. Texas
"There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance - that principle is contempt prior to investigation."
RedRocker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:51 AM   #23
mattwoods
Adventurer
 
mattwoods's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Bennington, Vermont
Oddometer: 65
One of my favorite fire building tricks

Good matches.


I don't like messing around with paper matches, saftety matches, or those strike anywhere matches that are reluctant to light up even when struck on the side of the box. So, I usually carry a few of these around (along with a magnesium firestick, some charcloth, and assorted other goodies). While the head is burning they will not blowout, and they'll light some pretty questionable tinder.

Just my $.02

*edit* They're usually sold as waterproof/windproof matches.

mattwoods screwed with this post 11-01-2011 at 10:52 AM Reason: Adding stuff.
mattwoods is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:52 AM   #24
Smithy OP
Avoiding the Skid-Demon
 
Smithy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: 22310
Oddometer: 7,528
Back to fire, then... highly skill-focused, though there are some commercial tricks that help out when things are tough.

On the vid I posted with the kid and the hawk, did you see how he was splitting wood? Held lengthwise to the hawk, and held with it as he struck down? Followed by a gentle twist to split the wood, it was an incredibly efficient manner of fuel preparation, I thought.

I have tried to hold up a thumb sized piece of wood, and wedge it down vertically with both knife and hawk, worrying about losing a digit the whole time. I have baton'd my knife through wood I shouldn't have, and only recently did I find this vid, and realize there might be a better way.


Good bushcraft is not only about mastering your skill, and your tools, but also about opening your mind. I believe creative thinking, combined with a positive attitude, can carry you an awful long way, even when odds are against you and the world has decided to have a bad day with you on center stage.
__________________
Consultant, Geospatial Science at Viking Geographic LLC Always Exploring
Proprietor of The Tidewater Forge Hot iron is my passion. Fire is my mistress. Let's dance.
35 Years of Scouting Blog for Bushcrafting and Boy Scouting experiences.
Smithy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:57 AM   #25
Smithy OP
Avoiding the Skid-Demon
 
Smithy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: 22310
Oddometer: 7,528
Done lost my train of thought for a moment there.

Fire.

A simple menage-a-trois of Heat, Oxygen, and Fuel. In balance, you have fire. Out of balance, you don't.

Add a fourth element, like moisture, and it makes it really hard to keep going as it absorbs heat, displaces oxygen, and prevents direct access to the fuel.
__________________
Consultant, Geospatial Science at Viking Geographic LLC Always Exploring
Proprietor of The Tidewater Forge Hot iron is my passion. Fire is my mistress. Let's dance.
35 Years of Scouting Blog for Bushcrafting and Boy Scouting experiences.
Smithy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 10:57 AM   #26
oj may
Have bike, will travel.
 
oj may's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Ann Arbor
Oddometer: 2,505
I agree Smithy, it is the first thing I noticed. I did a palm to forehead strike and realized I will change how I split the smaller stuff.
__________________
(lll>0<lll)
oj may is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 11:01 AM   #27
Askel
Perma-n00b
 
Askel's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Da UP, eh.
Oddometer: 10,450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithy View Post
Back to fire, then...
Maybe it's a local issue you have to deal with, but here in MI- there's no shortage at all of fuel that requires absolutely no chopping or sawing whatsoever. Tons and tons of deadfall on the ground and dead branches still on trees when that stuff is wet.

My favorite firestarter trick- I never throw out all the empty hippie bar wrappers that collect in my backpack. Expose those suckers to an open flame and they go up instantly and form a napalm like sludge of burning plastic that can get damp wood going.
Askel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 11:11 AM   #28
Stromdog
Howl at the Moon
 
Stromdog's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: St. Pete, FL
Oddometer: 2,703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithy View Post
Knives are an interesting subject, and we have a thread full of 'em.

But what makes a good bushcraft knife? Size? Shape? Mass?
Talk to ten different guys and you'll probably get twenty different answers! I think that's what makes knives so interesting. I've got quite a few knives ranging from slip joint trappers to machetes. I love them all and could make do with just about any of them. Having said that, the knife that I like using the most is my 5" bladed Helle Tiaga, mainly because it fits my hand so well. I don't baton it or chop with it, but use it for making feather sticks and cutting up one of my brothers "tonight the steaks are on me", type steaks. I also like to take along my Gransfors Bruks Wildlife axe.

For a "one knife only", ultra light, pack scenario, I think a full tanged knife in the 4" to 5" range, drop point, with a thickness of .150" to .200", would be able to do just about anything I'm familiar with doing using a knife.
Stromdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 11:36 AM   #29
Stromdog
Howl at the Moon
 
Stromdog's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: St. Pete, FL
Oddometer: 2,703
This thread has really taken off!

Here's a pic of my lightweight, fire starting kit.

[IMG][/IMG]

It's an empty 2 oz. plastic Badia brand seasoning bottle filled with Vaseline soaked, cotton dryer lint. Wrapped around it (using a slice from a bicycle inner tube), are a few sticks of fatwood, a firesteel and a striker. The whole thing weighs 3.5 oz. A few feather sticks later and "Viola", the heat is on.
Stromdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 11:45 AM   #30
Smithy OP
Avoiding the Skid-Demon
 
Smithy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: 22310
Oddometer: 7,528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stromdog View Post
This thread has really taken off!

Here's a pic of my lightweight, fire starting kit.

[IMG][/IMG]

It's an empty 2 oz. plastic Badia brand seasoning bottle filled with Vaseline soaked, cotton dryer lint. Wrapped around it (using a slice from a bicycle inner tube), are a few sticks of fatwood, a firesteel and a striker. The whole thing weighs 3.5 oz. A few feather sticks later and "Viola", the heat is on.

Ooohhhhh, daddy like.

Can you open that up and show the bottle? I don't know what a Badia is, just trying to get a sense of it - so I, or others, can improvise with any vial that's handy. Maybe a ruler for scale.


Sure sounds like a foolproof starting system, though. I might tuck some char in there just to help catch spark... do you find your greased lint catches sparks just fine? I admit, I've never tried it. Don't even think I have any Vaseline in the house.
__________________
Consultant, Geospatial Science at Viking Geographic LLC Always Exploring
Proprietor of The Tidewater Forge Hot iron is my passion. Fire is my mistress. Let's dance.
35 Years of Scouting Blog for Bushcrafting and Boy Scouting experiences.
Smithy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014