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Old 11-03-2011, 05:16 AM   #91
oj may
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I keep a small tube of Super Glue as a replacement for stitches. I have never used or practiced this skill. Has anyone found it successful?
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Old 11-03-2011, 05:56 AM   #92
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Originally Posted by oj may View Post
I keep a small tube of Super Glue as a replacement for stitches. I have never used or practiced this skill. Has anyone found it successful?
Not used it, but it really is a better idea than a needle and thread. Skin is tough stuff, and sewing is pretty hard to accomplish, especially without pain killers. Glue would be far easier. Within reason.

I've had quite a bit of practice wrapping wounds, but only in a first responder role. The object was to get the bleeding stopped or slowed down enough to transport. Should be the object any time there is a lot of blood involved.
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Old 11-03-2011, 06:11 AM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oj may View Post
I keep a small tube of Super Glue as a replacement for stitches. I have never used or practiced this skill. Has anyone found it successful?

I have never used it as a substitute for stitches but I use it all the time on cuts. Works great, just don't glue your fingers together. I've tried the good glue and the cheap stuff, so far, I like the dollar store stuff the best.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:01 AM   #94
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I'm a mechanic, so I'm constantly letting the blood out of my knuckles and hands- I keep Super Glue in the toolbox. Best quick stitch ever. I can't tell you how many times I've glued a flap of skin back down. Just clean it well, dry it and glue. Keep some antiseptic on it and you'll be good to go in no time.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:40 AM   #95
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I have never used it as a substitute for stitches but I use it all the time on cuts. Works great, just don't glue your fingers together. I've tried the good glue and the cheap stuff, so far, I like the dollar store stuff the best.
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I'm a mechanic, so I'm constantly letting the blood out of my knuckles and hands- I keep Super Glue in the toolbox. Best quick stitch ever. I can't tell you how many times I've glued a flap of skin back down. Just clean it well, dry it and glue. Keep some antiseptic on it and you'll be good to go in no time.
+1

I haven't used it for stitches yet, but I keep a tube of it in my work bag to cover cuts and keep my work gives in 1 piece.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:42 AM   #96
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+1

I haven't used it for stitches yet, but I keep a tube of it in my work bag to cover cuts and keep my work gives in 1 piece.
It makes a nice patch for small leaks on waterproof gear.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:48 AM   #97
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+1

I haven't used it for stitches yet
, but I keep a tube of it in my work bag to cover cuts and keep my work gives in 1 piece.
Yet being the operative word in the sentence.........























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Old 11-03-2011, 08:49 AM   #98
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I like to string up a tarp as cover for a tent when it's PNW out it helps keep your stuff dry / also provides a shady spot in the summer.

I've hung a tarp ~20 feet up above the fire pit - I keep lengths of cord or non-stretching line on small pieces of wood and use that to toss it over a limb, attach to the tarp and hoist 'er up there. I can usually find three or four branches close enough around here, to raise a tarp for cover.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:53 AM   #99
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On superglue for cuts, yes I've used it, but one should be careful not to let it get "in" your skin (inside the cut) because its chemicals are pretty toxic and letting it into your bloodstream is a bad thing. I have had several bad cuts on the tips of my fingers/thumbs, where a band-aid is utterly useless, but a good washing, drying, and then pinching it shut and covering with a thick layer of superglue has worked for me several times. I prefer the Gorilla brand, it's more flexible when set up than most CA glues. And yes, I pick at it, so I end up re-applying several times before it's healed, and I've never gotten an infection treating this way... the whole point is to seal the wound from outside contaminants, and keep body fluids in. This works.
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:13 AM   #100
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Dermabond specifically for that purpose. And yes I have.
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:19 AM   #101
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Unfortunately wilderness medicine is something I have practiced a pretty good bit. Chain saw wounds being the most gruesome followed by machete and bush ax wounds. The most common things I deal with are minor cuts and bee stings. We tend to get a lot of bee stings simultaneously so it is worse than it sounds.

The most important thing I can say about that is learn advanced first aid. With that knowledge you can generally make do with what you have at hand. Belts for tourniquets and splints, clothing for compression bandages, etc. Carrying knowledge is WAY more important than carrying first aid supplies.

One good thing about the times we live in now is communications. Back in my days we had to carry people out of the woods and get them to the ER or at least a phone. So I have carried people out of the woods several times. The hit list includes slicing through their knee tendons, slicing a foot half off and various forms of being unconscious.

So I got to use my First Responder training a good bit. And, of course, I have also been "that guy". I chopped a big muscadine vine and woke up in the ER. Apparently I took a nasty live oak widow maker and got carried out. I also had to deliver myself to the ER three of four times from machete cuts and dog attacks.
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:24 AM   #102
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"shiny things"

Ok, more 'gear' than bushcraft



Dynarex Emergency blankets- 84x52", inidividual packs are smaller than a cell phone and cost less than a buck each. Surprisingly effective, and there's no reason not to have one with you wherever you go.



Great thread by the way, I've already learned a ton of stuff I didn't know
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:55 AM   #103
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Unfortunately wilderness medicine is something I have practiced a pretty good bit. Chain saw wounds being the most gruesome followed by machete and bush ax wounds. The most common things I deal with are minor cuts and bee stings. We tend to get a lot of bee stings simultaneously so it is worse than it sounds.

The most important thing I can say about that is learn advanced first aid. With that knowledge you can generally make do with what you have at hand. Belts for tourniquets and splints, clothing for compression bandages, etc. Carrying knowledge is WAY more important than carrying first aid supplies.

One good thing about the times we live in now is communications. Back in my days we had to carry people out of the woods and get them to the ER or at least a phone. So I have carried people out of the woods several times. The hit list includes slicing through their knee tendons, slicing a foot half off and various forms of being unconscious.

So I got to use my First Responder training a good bit. And, of course, I have also been "that guy". I chopped a big muscadine vine and woke up in the ER. Apparently I took a nasty live oak widow maker and got carried out. I also had to deliver myself to the ER three of four times from machete cuts and dog attacks.

Fantastic post. Thank you. I agree on knowledge trumping gear in this case... while sterile is better, knowing what to do "right the hell now" is more important, even with improvised materials. Unless you're taking a medic with you, with a packload of ER tools, a "first aid kit" will never be enough to cover every possibility. That's one reason mine is so light - I figure the quickclot for profuse extremety bleeding, binding with clothing and sticks, and the duct tape I carry, is going to have to be enough to get me to urgent care.

This is also one of those touchy areas where nobody can tell you what to do - educate yourself, and prepare according to your skill and confidence levels. Follow some basic rules, like not adding to the casualty list by being stupid in rescue attempts, minding shock and hypothermia situations, and maintaining a calm atmosphere while providing treatment.
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:01 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by Boondoggle View Post
Ok, more 'gear' than bushcraft



Dynarex Emergency blankets- 84x52", inidividual packs are smaller than a cell phone and cost less than a buck each. Surprisingly effective, and there's no reason not to have one with you wherever you go.



Great thread by the way, I've already learned a ton of stuff I didn't know

I've heard mixed reviews of the "cheap" mylar blankets, including them deteriorating in a kit so that when opened, you got 100 little squares of foil. The cheap ones tear easily as well, are noisy, and are all but impossible to repack.

My kit features a pair of AMK-SOL 2-person survival blankets, which are 20% bigger, rate a 90% reflection capability, and weigh 3oz. They're heavier duty, more tear resistant, and come in a handy little pouch you can re-purpose or reuse the blanket with. Still inexpensive, at $6 I think... but quite possibly far more effective, especially for us "plus sized" outdoorsmen.

My next campout, which was scheduled for Veteran's day, got canceled but I may just go out myself or with a buddy that weekend. I will test the use of just those, and the SOL Bivy sheet, in lieu of a proper sleeping bag, and report back here.

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Old 11-03-2011, 12:01 PM   #105
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To piggyback on Grreatdog’s post, I’ve really enjoyed Wilderness Medicine Institute courses and I think they’re about the best thing going (ok, I’m sure there are other good ones :) ) if you’re interested in emergency medical skills. The stuff you learn in these courses is hands-on, with a lot of practice.

http://www.nols.edu/wmi/
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