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Old 02-02-2012, 05:35 AM   #76
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Today the mold comes off
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Old 02-02-2012, 06:47 AM   #77
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Honestly, I hope it turns out. Concrete is a very difficult and complicated material to work with and it takes a lot of practice to make it look decent. I took a couple concrete formwork classes and the biggest problems we had were:

1. Form release (didn't use oil, wax, etc.)

2. No Chamfered edges. You need to place a chamfer on the edges either by forming or by trowel.

3. Rebar/reinforcement height. Set the rebar on "legs" to get the proper height off the bottom. Choose the proper size reinforcement, making sure that it doesn't protrude past specified distance from edge of forms or surface of pour. Reinforcement goes on the top edge, not the bottom edge of a pour.

4. Not enough vibration results in honeycombing

5. No taping/closing off edges causes the concrete to seep through and "burr" (push through screws in the forms, etc.)

6. Be sure enough reinforcement (most of the time looks very excessive due to weight of concrete) I'd just pour it on a floor to eliminate the need for a bottom and lots of reinforcement (put plastic underneath).

7. Finishing wet is hard, be sure to chamfer edges and "pull" water/cement out of the mix to the surface, add in concrete in low spots.

Basically instead of grinding the shit out of the concrete, making a big mess and exposing mesh/rebar/other mistakes, just be sure to wet finish it with a trowel. If the concrete doesn't have enough water at the surface, take the trowel and "pull" water up by pushing up and down slightly creating suction to draw water/cement to the surface.

If needed, spray a very light film of water over the surface to assist in pulling, possibly use a screed (that long trowel with a pole attached to it). Or if you are going for exposed aggregate, the concrete can be washed away, but would leave an uneven surface (nice for sidewalks, walls, etc.) This is how people get that smooth finish on countertops.

If I were to pour countertops (and not that I have and good on you for going for it) I would pour on the floor, make it very, very simple (square not rounded).

I would use a greater depth pour, it looks like you are going to have issues with reinforcement coming through on the finish work, possibly only use mesh (4000 psi sidewalks only use mesh).
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Old 02-02-2012, 07:23 AM   #78
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Very interesting thread! Subscribed.
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Old 02-02-2012, 07:35 AM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skinner View Post
It's two inches thick, all of the rebar and wire are at least one inch from the surface, hold down with screws into the underlayment.
Oh no, you screwed the rebar into the bottom of the formwork?
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Old 02-02-2012, 09:31 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ishdishwishfish View Post
Honestly, I hope it turns out. Concrete is a very difficult and complicated material to work with and it takes a lot of practice to make it look decent.
No more complicated or difficult than any other construction material. As finish carpenter, I find it much more forgiving than wood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ishdishwishfish View Post
Oh no, you screwed the rebar into the bottom of the formwork?
He said underlayment, not formwork. Big difference.
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Old 02-02-2012, 11:10 AM   #81
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Sorry I did not read all the comments and post. But this topic is slightly dear to me as I help make a set.

Going to visit a freind for the weekend. He says bring the bike we'll go for a afternoon ride, I jsut need a little help pouring some concret in the morning. Well the project was a set of counter tops. He had the forms made and rented the mixer and vibrator before I awoke. However we poured those fucken counter tops all day and very got to go out for a ride.

Tips I remember. Vibrate the HELL out of everything. Jsut stick the vibrator on the form. Caulk the seams of the form to make everything smooth as can be. If you are going to have knock outs for faucets, soap dispensors, make sure tha t they are well spaces from the edges. Otherwise they are very easy to crack. It is easiers to deal with smaller pieces than really large ones. Large sinel sections crack easily. As you already figured out the tops need to be poslished and sealed. There is no way to pour it smooth enough. Mixing is the color is cool, but be very precies on the amount, otherise you will get sections with different shades. I am sure you got abook already that tells you the varying mixture of aggregate and cement. You really need to Huck Fin some freinds into helping. It take alot more time and man power than you might think.

Good luck. Have fun.
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Old 02-02-2012, 11:23 AM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tweaker View Post
No more complicated or difficult than any other construction material. As finish carpenter, I find it much more forgiving than wood.



He said underlayment, not formwork. Big difference.
Underlayment? Maybe I'm missing something, but sounds like something off the red green show to me
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Old 02-02-2012, 12:19 PM   #83
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I told my wife about this thread last night, and mentioned that I might consider concrete countertops.

She asked, you mean do it yourself?

I said sure.

She paused, and said "We'll get granite".

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Old 02-02-2012, 12:22 PM   #84
ishdishwishfish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Wi View Post
I told my wife about this thread last night, and mentioned that I might consider concrete countertops.

She asked, you mean do it yourself?

I said sure.

She paused, and said "We'll get granite".

Haha I don't mean to be a dick about it, but I'd try something for the garage first, then move to the house. This guy's bold.
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Old 02-02-2012, 02:07 PM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Wi View Post
I told my wife about this thread last night, and mentioned that I might consider concrete countertops.

She asked, you mean do it yourself?

I said sure.

She paused, and said "We'll get granite".

If you can't DIY you can have professionals do it for you.

I first heard about them years ago on This Old House.
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/phot...050150,00.html







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Old 02-02-2012, 05:08 PM   #86
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Almost there! Some sealing and then polishing!


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Old 02-02-2012, 05:13 PM   #87
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Only took about two and a half hours to do all of ther grinding. Now I added an acrylis slurry to the top to fill any tiny voids and grind with the 400 grit, 800 grit, 1,500 grit and then polish with the 3,000 grit. Then seal and polish with carnuba wax!
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Old 02-02-2012, 05:32 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ishdishwishfish View Post
Honestly, I hope it turns out. Concrete is a very difficult and complicated material to work with and it takes a lot of practice to make it look decent. I took a couple concrete formwork classes and the biggest problems we had were:

1. Form release (didn't use oil, wax, etc.)Released perfect! Used Melamine

2. No Chamfered edges. You need to place a chamfer on the edges either by forming or by trowel. Rounded them off with the grinder, they are perfect

3. Rebar/reinforcement height. Set the rebar on "legs" to get the proper height off the bottom. Choose the proper size reinforcement, making sure that it doesn't protrude past specified distance from edge of forms or surface of pour. Reinforcement goes on the top edge, not the bottom edge of a pour. Nope, they were set 1/2 inch off the bottom with the wire over top into two inches of #5,000 concrete

4. Not enough vibration results in honeycombing. Nope vibrated a lot

5. No taping/closing off edges causes the concrete to seep through and "burr" (push through screws in the forms, etc.) Nope, sealed them all with pure silicone worked perfect

6. Be sure enough reinforcement (most of the time looks very excessive due to weight of concrete) I'd just pour it on a floor to eliminate the need for a bottom and lots of reinforcement (put plastic underneath). Hope it's good enough, 3/8 undelayment 5 ply bc plywood, 1/2 inch rebar and rewire, only a guess on my part, but so far so good! Time will tell

7. Finishing wet is hard, be sure to chamfer edges and "pull" water/cement out of the mix to the surface, add in concrete in low spots.

Basically instead of grinding the shit out of the concrete, making a big mess and exposing mesh/rebar/other mistakes, just be sure to wet finish it with a trowel. If the concrete doesn't have enough water at the surface, take the trowel and "pull" water up by pushing up and down slightly creating suction to draw water/cement to the surface.

If needed, spray a very light film of water over the surface to assist in pulling, possibly use a screed (that long trowel with a pole attached to it). Or if you are going for exposed aggregate, the concrete can be washed away, but would leave an uneven surface (nice for sidewalks, walls, etc.) This is how people get that smooth finish on countertops.

If I were to pour countertops (and not that I have and good on you for going for it) I would pour on the floor, make it very, very simple (square not rounded). Grinding was easy, I embedded decorative aggregate into the surface and troweled it in so it would show up when grinding, smooth as a mirror! Screed across the top to level it using a 2x4 acroos the tops of the form.

I would use a greater depth pour, it looks like you are going to have issues with reinforcement coming through on the finish work, possibly only use mesh (4000 psi sidewalks only use mesh).
Good things to think about though!
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Old 02-02-2012, 05:38 PM   #89
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well done, it looks great. Can we get a good close up detail of the surface and finish showing the aggregate details?
I'll definitely be playing around with this stuff one day.
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Old 02-02-2012, 07:55 PM   #90
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well done, it looks great. Can we get a good close up detail of the surface and finish showing the aggregate details?
I'll definitely be playing around with this stuff one day.
Not until it's complete! About another week or so until I can get back to it! I put a slurry acrylic coat on tonight to fill any tiny holes etc, polish that off, seal and wax! There will be lots of close ups for you!
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