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Old 06-22-2012, 09:16 PM   #1
dogjaw OP
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Moto Guzzi V7 Racer vs Triumph Thruxton

been hankering for a Triumph for quite some time now, but then happened across a Guzzi cafe racer.... seem to be pretty close in power and delivery, just not sure of any issues either bikes bring to the table. I do love the soul that these bikes seem to excude,,, any input?
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:44 PM   #2
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My old body doesn't appreciate the riding position on those bikes, but I did have the Scrambler version of the Triumph for a couple of years. It's a great bike and lots of fun. If the Thruxton fits you, I'm sure you'd enjoy it and it's an absolutely gorgeous bike. My modern Triumphs (I've had four) have all been dead reliable.

If you're primarily looking for "soul", the Guzzi would be my choice. It's very easy to become addicted to this marque. I haven't owned a V7 yet, but likely will when the revised version becomes available. It is being sold now in Europe and is supposed to be in the US late this year. The changes include a single throttle body instead of duals, steel tank instead of plastic, and cast wheels available on the Stone model. They are supposed to have a bit of a horsepower increase as well. The V7 Racer is a beautiful bike but not exactly my style, and then again there is that riding position thing. In the past, new Guzzis have been known to have some little niggles that required a bit of sorting. But once this is done, they have proven to be solid machines. Over the last few years, since Guzzi was bought by Piaggio, they are showing less need for "sorting". Fine machines with loads of character and lovely Italian styling. Can you tell I'm a fan?
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:45 PM   #3
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Buy your skinny jeans and Davida helmet now

and bring some PBR for the other hipsters.
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Old 06-22-2012, 11:35 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Grainbelt View Post
Buy your skinny jeans and Davida helmet now

and bring some PBR for the other hipsters.
or ride a bike that you approve of .... lame
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Old 06-23-2012, 03:13 AM   #5
rocker59
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Same retro niche.

The Guzzi is over 50 lbs lighter. The Triumph has more power.

Looks like you'll be driving to Tulsa for either brand's dealers.

The little Guzzi is a lot of fun.
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Old 06-23-2012, 05:04 AM   #6
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Can't comment on the Triumph except for comparing specs as the others have done. With greater displacement and more power, the Triumph will feel quite different to drive than the V7. The power will be an a aphrodisiac. You'll feel the weight difference in the ability of the bike to corner though.

I own a V7 Racer and love this bike to pieces. It is light and handles well although others have commented that the motorcycle is not a fast cornering machine. That depends on what you are used to and what are your expectations. The V7 has tons of character. The exhaust sound is deep and wonderful.

The choice is up to what you based upon what you feel is important to you. There are other opinions in this thread:

http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=55063.0
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Old 06-23-2012, 09:06 AM   #7
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The V7 Cafe is beautifully simple. The racer is more than a little garish, IMO.

Same mechanicals. More power for 2012, a lot lighter than the bonnie.






Cafe is gone for this year. But the new 'Stone' with cast wheels would look great with a set of cafe bars.


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Old 06-23-2012, 01:23 PM   #8
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Not sure what the USA is getting, but here there are 3 versions of the V7. Each of them look great.

Piaggio are also claiming parts can be shipped in 48 hours, if needed.
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Old 06-23-2012, 02:12 PM   #9
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Piaggio claims they can ship parts in 48 hours? Maybe for a Guzzi? Not for Piaggio scooter. More like 10 days.
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Old 06-23-2012, 04:08 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Grainbelt View Post
Cafe is gone for this year. But the new 'Stone' with cast wheels would look great with a set of cafe bars.


These have never tickled my fancy...until now. That's lovely.

I've owned a Bonneville. It was great bike for sure, but I wouldn't own another until it loses 80ish pounds...which likely won't happen.

I've thought the V7 Racer was one of the douchiest of motorcycles I'd ever seen (and I ride a Ducati). The "Stone's" simplicity seems to redeem MG with simplicity that the "Racer" lacks.
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Old 06-23-2012, 07:28 PM   #11
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What a coincidence - I finally rode a V7 Classic today. They also had a V7 Racer on the floor. Having seen it in the flesh, I have to believe the V7 Racer is the most beautiful production bike being made today. My 20 year old brain was really trying hard to convince my nearly 50 year old body that it could tolerate the riding position. Damn I want that bike, but making "comfort" modifications to a V7 racer would just be a crime.

The ride on the V7 Classic was great. I was instantly transformed backwards in time 10 years to the only other Guzzi I've ever owned or ridden, a 2002 V11 LeMans. The engine sounded pretty much the same, the transmission and final drive made the same light whining sounds, it shook in the same way, and the center of gravity felt much the same, even though the V7 is 10 years newer and 100 lbs lighter. Dripping with character, if any machine is truly capable of such a thing. I really want to buy one, but I'm interested in the cast wheels and steel tank of the next gen. When it hits these shores I'll be ready.

I rode a little over 200 miles round trip to the dealer to ride the bike, (this is the closest Guzzi dealer to me), and I did so on my Tiger 800. Yea, I know it isn't a Thruxton, but that give you an idea of what I think of the Triumph brand. I'd buy the racer over the Thruxton in a New York minute.
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Old 06-24-2012, 02:13 PM   #12
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I own a V7 Racer and really love this bike, even after only a few months of ownership. The bike is indescribably beautiful -- a marvelous combining of old school cafe looks and feel with modern FI and suspension components. Very nicely executed by Piaggio. The ride is so nice. It corners well enough for me; others have said the steering is slow. Tucked in behind a cafe fairing and it make you feel like you're back in the sixties, trying for that Ton. I have a huge smile on my face every time I take this beauty out for a spin.


I've not ridden a Thruxton so I can't offer any first hand advice or comparison. There are such comparisons on Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi forum:

http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php...0018#msg830018
http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php...6426#msg706426
http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php...3758#msg793758

As for issues, the V7's lean fuel map in the ECU from the factory introduces a certain amount of cold bloodedness to the bike, requiring it to be warmed up before it performs adequately. Some, including myself, have sought aftermarket products to rectify the symptoms associated with the lean mixture. For example, a Dynojet Powercommander V and O2 Optimizer, or an ECU reflash will change the fuel mapping and return the performance of the bike back to what most expect. However, these additions cost money and you can sink as little as $400 or as much as $1200 into the full suite of aftermarket products to achieve these ends. That should factor into your decision.
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Old 06-24-2012, 04:22 PM   #13
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As the nearest dealer is quite some distance away, any maintenance niggles are figuring into my process. I have had a Triumph Thunderbird, and love the brand, but it seems the Guzzi owners are almost fanatical about their bikes; I love the soul factor, having put many miles on Hondas and Suzukis, reliable as sunrise, but not ASAP much panache.
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Old 06-24-2012, 05:21 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by dogjaw View Post
As the nearest dealer is quite some distance away, any maintenance niggles are figuring into my process....
The flipside is that the Guzzi is entirely home servicable with screw & locknut adjusted pushrod operated valves, shaft drive, fuel injection (the new one with single throttle body does not even need balancing) separate gearbox & engine oil with dry clutch so the tightwads can even use car oil if they so wish. The only bike that comes close to the V7's ease of servicing is the Hardly-Drivable 883, though pulling wheels on those things is a bear & as a bonus the V7 comes without the ugly HD build quality (& image quality..)
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Old 06-24-2012, 07:15 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by rbm View Post

As for issues, the V7's lean fuel map in the ECU from the factory introduces a certain amount of cold bloodedness to the bike, requiring it to be warmed up before it performs adequately. Some, including myself, have sought aftermarket products to rectify the symptoms associated with the lean mixture. For example, a Dynojet Powercommander V and O2 Optimizer, or an ECU reflash will change the fuel mapping and return the performance of the bike back to what most expect. However, these additions cost money and you can sink as little as $400 or as much as $1200 into the full suite of aftermarket products to achieve these ends. That should factor into your decision.
I noticed the cold blooded nature. Since it was a warm day it was generally gone within a couple of miles. I'd bet it takes a bit longer to go away in cooler weather, but regardless it wouldn't be enough of an issue to prevent me from purchasing an otherwise really fun motorcycle.
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