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Old 01-08-2012, 08:16 AM   #16
BigEasy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boulder Ed View Post
Now to find a cool skidplate for the R1200R, to add that little Mongolia touch and campground protection.
I'm pretty sure the GS skid plate bolts right up
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Old 01-08-2012, 08:32 AM   #17
1LIFE2LIVE
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I love mine




I've bought and sold at least six bikes since I brought this one home in '07 and it very well may be my forever bike. It just works for me, and I'm 6'5" with a 34" inseam
Which seat is that you have there?
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Old 01-08-2012, 08:52 AM   #18
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Which seat is that you have there?
Rich's Custom.

He offered a group buy discount in the vendors section a couple of years ago and I immediately pulled the trigger. Mine was only the 2nd R12R he had done and we did the build without a ride in and in my butts opinion it worked out great. Here's a video a guy did when Rich built his, the first one he built http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReMQF3XWhvQ

I know he's done a third for a guy on the r1150r.org board since mine. My only regret is I cheaped out and didn't install the heated option.
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BigEasy screwed with this post 01-08-2012 at 10:09 AM Reason: I can't spell for shit
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Old 01-08-2012, 10:02 AM   #19
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Thanks - Nice Bike

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Old 01-08-2012, 01:26 PM   #20
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What kind of engine protection crash bars is the OP using?
Looks like Hepco and Becker.

http://www.adventuremotorcycleparts....ycle-crashbars
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Old 01-08-2012, 02:09 PM   #21
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On a trip down the coast last year

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Old 01-08-2012, 03:03 PM   #22
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Annual Maintenance Cost?

I really want one of these but after my last 3 years owning a F650gs Dakar I've pretty much given up on BMW. I know the bikes (F650 Dakar vs RR) are COMPLETELY different but it was more of what BMW expects bike maintenance should cost.

Every 6,000 miles my bike was supposed to get a $700 service. I'd do that twice a year w/ the miles I ride (and I don't even commute on it). It was just too rich for my blood.

So I am curious what kind of annual maintenance costs you are spending on the RR.

I am looking at the Yamaha FJR as the alternate.

BTW - want a really sweet looking RR? - take the can off completely. Sounds great too. Just ad a small turnout and you are done.
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:10 PM   #23
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Argl ... who wants to swap a red 2011/2012 R1200R with hard bags and all goodies for my white R1200GS with all goodies and Micatech hardbags?

I might get the R bug again and replace my GS this summer with one of these beauties.
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:25 PM   #24
BigEasy
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The R12R is incredibly easy to work on in a DIY garage. For whatever reason I use mfg branded synthetic oil in the BMW. So oil and filter is $65.00ish, the FD oil is $15.00 a quart and it takes 180ml/change and I do it when I change rear tires (the early 12R's required the tire/wheel to be pulled to rotate the FD to drain it, the 09 and newer bikes have the drain plug at the bottom negating the FD rotation making the job that much easier)which is more than spec'd. so if you ride 10k/year you're looking at <$150.00 for materials. The valve check takes +/-1hr and costs nada. This assumes you can/are willing to work on your bike yourself.

I have so far had the dealership do the brake fluid flushes on mine but have yet to pay for it due to brake line recalls on the early models. I'll probably continue to have the dealer do that work every three years with an anual inspection for less than $300.00 combined.

Personally I wouldn't let maintenance cost stand in the way if you're reasonably confident with doing your own wrenching. I guess if you use these numbers you're looking at less than $250.00/year and most of that is materials you'd use on any bike.
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:42 PM   #25
pyrate
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigEasy View Post
The R12R is incredibly easy to work on in a DIY garage. For whatever reason I use mfg branded synthetic oil in the BMW. So oil and filter is $65.00ish, the FD oil is $15.00 a quart and it takes 180ml/change and I do it when I change rear tires (the early 12R's required the tire/wheel to be pulled to rotate the FD to drain it, the 09 and newer bikes have the drain plug at the bottom negating the FD rotation making the job that much easier)which is more than spec'd. so if you ride 10k/year you're looking at <$150.00 for materials. The valve check takes +/-1hr and costs nada. This assumes you can/are willing to work on your bike yourself.

I have so far had the dealership do the brake fluid flushes on mine but have yet to pay for it due to brake line recalls on the early models. I'll probably continue to have the dealer do that work every three years with an anual inspection for less than $300.00 combined.

Personally I wouldn't let maintenance cost stand in the way if you're reasonably confident with doing your own wrenching. I guess if you use these numbers you're looking at less than $250.00/year and most of that is materials you'd use on any bike.
Yeah, I have the tools. I did most the work on my Dakar but valve adjusts were so time consuming that I had one done by the dealer when I was short on time. And they kept stating my bike wasn't update to date on service because they had no record of the previous valve checks being done. I told them I did it and that didn't sit well with them. But when they finished the valve check it was in spec so obviously I hadn't done anything wrong previously. But they couldn't mark it in their book as a dealer service so kept giving me a hard time about it.

I know a lot of it was simply I don't trust my local dealer....

Thanks for the feedback.
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Old 01-08-2012, 04:06 PM   #26
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Maintenance costs

I have run Mobil 1 15-50 or Valvoline 10-40 full synthetics for 8 years on BMWs with zero oil consumption or issues. You don't really need the high buck motorcycle oils in a separate tranny unit type design. I normally go 4000-4500 miles between changes and valve adjustments. My R1200GSA seems to start a slight popping between short shifts after around 4500 miles, which the valve adjustment always clears up. Around 6,000 -8000 or so on final drive and tranny. For those I have used both 75-140 and the 75-90 syn oils (Mobil 1 and valvoline). I could be dreaming but I think the valvoline actually shifts smoother than the Mobil one on the R1200's. Brakes I flush with Dot 4 about every 2 years now. Previously I did it every year, but I see no difference in anything and help maintain some high mile bikes as well as my own GSA and 1200R. I have yet to flush the mineral oil clutch fluid but bought two little bottles from BMW the other day as my GSA has 51K on it . BMW told me they "very rarely" change it out.

So cost can be substantially less with autopart store fluids, even using the absolute equivalent-to-BMW OEM high end stuff. I do worry about maintenance costs though when you take the bike in to the shop. It is outrageous, but its the labor that is the worst part. And we all know the labor takes time. Sure, I can do the valves in a little over an hour, but they will better if I spend 1.5 hours and get them perfect. I can probably do the valves, ride and warm the bike up for 15 minutes, then do the other fluids including brakes in 4 hours total. I don't know how the newer water cooled/DOHC boxers or modern K bikes will fare regarding DIY valve adjustments. I've done shimmed valves on my Jap bikes in the past, but on most Jap street bikes you rarely need to change a shim. On the little 650GS's I've serviced them, and set them up for Mexico, and they are a pain in the posterior to tear down for service, so costly. As I recall, the valves in particular are absolutely buried under layers of plastic. I think the R is way easier to do.

I do think part of BMW's plan is to force us to bring the bikes in. Its also the only reason I never owned a Ducati. Come on, the Yamaha inline 4 with it's 24K valve adjustment interval has been in effect since 1987. Its a shame to need to have someone else service your bike, as knowing how to work on your bike, and the time one spends observing critical things during the service, assessing brake pad wear, tire wear etc., is an added safety benefit. Its the perfect bonding time.
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:18 PM   #27
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GS vs R

No question the R bike is a fantastic and beautiful ride. Had an 07, but traded it for a 09GS and wouldn't change a thing. The GS is a bit slower and slightly more thirsty on the freeway, but it is WAY more comfortable for me. Fits me perfectly, where the R had me stiff in the knees after an hour or two in the saddle. Also, the GS has superior handling for me. Just wanted to show the other side of the equation! . BTW, I am 5'11" w/34" inseam
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:23 PM   #28
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R1200R vs. R1200GS

Interesting you mention that. My 32" inseam knees would be too cramped on our particular R for a long trip, due to the low custom seat my wife has on it. I remember it being a tighter framed seating position even before the seat was added though, relative to my 07 GSA which is a monster and very comfortable. I've done at least two 940+ mile days on it. And, it is thirstier than not only the R1200R by 15% but loses by 10% pretty consistently over the standard GS, even when I am trying hard to win the gas war. Its the higher weight, the lower 6th gear ratio, and the fact that I'm always carrying everyone's gear around for em
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Old 01-08-2012, 08:07 PM   #29
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Sure, the R is slightly tighter and lower than a GS. Though the difference is between 74 and 81 degree knee angle (for me with 34" inseam) with the high seat on the R (which you have to order specifically, as nearly all US models of the R have the lower comfort seat - damn it). That difference isn't too bad.

Give it 20mm handle bar risers and the upper position is pretty close. I would want a tiny little bit forward lean to fight the wind better, therefore the risers might not be necessary at all.

Yes, the GS is a wonderful and very versatile bike, but what gets me sometimes is "change". I might have the perfect bike for me and I still want change. Don't really have the room for two bikes, I have two at the moment, but selling the WR - mainly for space constraints.
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Old 01-09-2012, 05:46 AM   #30
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I have both

I have a 2007 R1200R & added a 2012 R1200GSA to the stable a couple weeks ago. Both bikes are great, but at 6' 4" with 34" inseam, the GSA is more comfortable for longer rides & the windscreens are definitely better for it on the highway & in the winter.

I may have to get the high comfort seat for the R, as the stock seat starts to get tight in the knees & butt after 2-300 miles. It's better when you are on secondary roads as you shift around more, but highway duty gets painful quickly. On secondary roads 7-8 hours in the saddle is doable without feeling like you really pushed yourself.

The R feels faster to accelerate (probably due to much lower weight) & feels quicker thru the twisties. I'm glad I have both, as they are 2 of the best all-around bikes out there, but surprisingly there is enough character difference between the two to make it fun to switch between them.
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