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Old 02-12-2012, 04:45 PM   #31
Ohio_Danimal OP
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Originally Posted by Sirbike View Post
Hey everyone, This is a great excuse to buy a new tool.
Frank! So good to see you join.
'
What tool are we talking about? I'll get it right away.

Welcome to ADV by the way. You'll love the Ride Reports
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Old 02-12-2012, 06:07 PM   #32
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broken stud/bolt removal

I recently had an exhaust bolt break so got the enjoy the process of removing it. First I bought the screw-type extractor that threads LH onto the remains of the stud and as you tighten it (theoretically) backs out the remains. There was not enough of a stub left so mine bottomed out against the head surface and then proceeded to ream off the portion of the bolt it was hooked onto. $20 tool so it was worth trying. Then I bought the cam-type extractor that fits onto the remains and as you tighten it (theoretically) backs out the remains. Working with about 3/8" of stub there was not enough for the tool to grasp adequately and it walked off the end of the piece. Another $20 or so.

Then I called in a welder for a trick I'd heard about wherein you slip a flat washer over the remains and then a nut. Weld the nut to the remains and use a wrench to turn it out. Our three attempts succeeded in breaking off more little chunks of the remaining bolt until it was flush. At this point we could have tried again by welding the washer to the remains and the nut to the washer but did not. $60 for that.

Tried drilling but simply could not get the right angle of attack (VW engine still in the van) and finally wound up pulling the head for a machinist to handle. $40 for drilling and helicoil.

I actually had two break but got the first one by using heat, PB Blaster and, finally, a small pipe wrench that would fit and give me enough leverage to get that one out. I gave in on the second before I could do too much damage since I, too, had been warned not to break off a bit or EZ Out in it. Good luck!
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Old 02-12-2012, 07:00 PM   #33
wee-twin
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Heat base of stud, then melt candle wax at base of stud. Wax will wick into threads and acts as lube. Before using vicegrip, cut two flatspots on stud so vicegrip does not slip/spin on stud. Once it moves a little, lube it again and slowly work it back and forth to reduce chance of pulling the aluminum threads. If you concentrate the heat on the aluminum instead of the stud the aluminum will expand before the steel stud and create the clearance needed to free it. Patience....

wee-twin screwed with this post 02-13-2012 at 06:13 AM
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:21 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Ohio_Danimal View Post
Thanks...I think
It's not like I wannait but it is worth the effort to bring back to full strength
No seriously. Much respect. I'm always impressed when someone wears out a bike (through use, not abuse) and puts it back together. It seems that most of these later model SV's rarely see more than 20k miles.
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:34 AM   #35
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No seriously. Much respect. I'm always impressed when someone wears out a bike (through use, not abuse) and puts it back together. It seems that most of these later model SV's rarely see more than 20k miles.
It's worth it. The bike has been a pleasure to own and ride and is as comfy as can be. With the suspension and brakes sorted (read:replaced) it is on rails in the turns as well.

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Old 02-14-2012, 09:28 AM   #36
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It's worth it. The bike has been a pleasure to own and ride and is as comfy as can be. With the suspension and brakes sorted (read:replaced) it is on rails in the turns as well.
Suspension was the primary reason I switched to the SMT. I was too intimidated to try swapping the front end myself. I didn't wan't a project that would result in extended downtime, I just wanted it fixed. But the cost to fix it with my wallet seemed too high relative to the blue book value. I frequently suffer from analysis paralysis.
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Old 02-14-2012, 09:40 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by ultrachrome View Post
Suspension was the primary reason I switched to the SMT. I was too intimidated to try swapping the front end myself. I didn't wan't a project that would result in extended downtime, I just wanted it fixed. But the cost to fix it with my wallet seemed too high relative to the blue book value. I frequently suffer from analysis paralysis.
there is SOOO much info available online concerning swapping a GSXR front end onto a SV650, as well as exactly what SS rear shocks fit and what spring rates are best, etc. that it really was pretty straightforward.
I took my time assembling the parts and just did it.

after selling the stock front end, the actual cost of the swap was less than adding emulators and springs!
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Old 02-14-2012, 10:08 AM   #38
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Didja get the stud out?
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Old 02-14-2012, 01:54 PM   #39
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Got that fucker out
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Old 02-14-2012, 05:13 PM   #40
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Holy smoke and ashes to clean up after that.

The tools and process, live jams from Phish concerts, Oxy-map torch kit from lowes on the bolt until hints of red, then concurrently a map torch to heat the aluminum so the stud gets hotter (less heat sink), remove heat, then vise grip that sucker for dear life and shoot pb blaster right on the stud and start working it, maybe add a little heat to the aluminum while spraying more pb at the stud until it all cools down and seizes and repeat the whole process several times for an hour. At that point we had on full thread out and the purchase on the stud was deteriorating. Next was to dremel off flat spots that were in line with the best vise grip marks. About 15 minutes later another turn. Then dremel flats again. From that point it came out cold but with liberal amounts of going back and forth with a lot more pb and 15 more minutes. Threads came out great.

I don't know about that torch kit, it might be kind of a toy but it's my toy new and it got the job done.

Dan's goin'
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Old 02-14-2012, 06:07 PM   #41
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Old 02-14-2012, 09:10 PM   #42
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I cannot thank my friend Frank (Sirbike here on ADV) enough for removing that stud while I was at work today. When I got the text from him with the picture of the stud gone, I felt so relieved!
Now on to swapping the motors andd swingarms tomorrow. Here's a few pictures of right before he got the stud out so you can see what little there was left of it


And finally the SV on the stand for the work tomorrow
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Old 02-15-2012, 04:57 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ultrachrome View Post
Suspension was the primary reason I switched to the SMT. I was too intimidated to try swapping the front end myself. I didn't wan't a project that would result in extended downtime, I just wanted it fixed. But the cost to fix it with my wallet seemed too high relative to the blue book value.
For what it's worth, you can get used GSXR forks on ebay for 100-150 dollars. I have a nice set that I am using on a different (non-SV) project, and they cost me 100 bucks. They're not from one of the brandy-new bikes, but they're modern, beefy, USD forks, and for that price, they would be a huge improvement on almost any non-supersport bike.

Of course you still need to sort the brakes and stuff out, so there is more cost, but still. Like He said, probably less than the cost of springs and emulators.

All that being said, my (our) SV has stock forks, because the bike is ridden in a way that it doesn't really matter. I have other stuff for when I want to ride hard, and the lady rides it more than me anyway.
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Old 02-16-2012, 05:31 AM   #44
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So a lot of work was done last night. Was gonna upload pictures we took but got home late and still throbbing from a smashed finger. Got the motor out, cleaned up everything (was a filthy mess underneath), greased all suspension components and installed the new swingarm. Decided to get a new shock rather than rebuild the zx636 shock i am running. Heres a quick cell pic
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Old 02-16-2012, 07:29 AM   #45
RxZ
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Awesome job! I hope that one day I have enough mechanical know how and tools to do something like this (I'm 30 now, better get to work )

This will be like a new bike once your done: new engine and most of the suspension redone!
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