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Old 02-02-2012, 03:22 PM   #31
KG6BWS
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Originally Posted by browneye View Post
Damn, that's a bargain. This economy has sprung so many bargains out there it's mind boggling. I'm tempted to get one of them just because they're only $70. I can handle a fast action. Gee, what a deal.

Recommend stocking-foot waders and some boots. It's a more verstatile system. You can use the boots alone or the waders in a float tube. Seems they've gotten away from the neoprene ones. Gee, guess I've been away from this for a LONG time.
I like my neoprene waders but Im looking at some of these new ones coming out. THe neoprene just dont pack small enough for on the bike. Between them and the boots, they take up ALOT of space.
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:33 AM   #32
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Fly-fishing is similar to motorcycling, in that there is always something more to purchase. You can really find yourself chasing your tail with gear, but the suggestions already posted have been very spot on.
I live in the Adirondacks, and like to fish ponds for big trout, both speckled and brown, so I grew up using old soft bamboo rods with Orenmatic reels for trolling wet flies deep. Once I got into casting and dry fly fishing, these heavy old 9-footers just didn't work very well, especially on small streams. I built my own rod using an older Diamondback blank, and it was a medium fast action that worked pretty well for everyting, but not great for any one thing. I finally decided to get two rods, one larger for ponds and big streams, and one smaller for the little ones. I ended up building the 8.5 using a Hexagraph blank, and then bought a little small stream rod from Hexagraph that was a demo. I love both of these rods, because they have the old, slower action that I am used to, and their synthetic bamboo construction makes them very strong. The little rod has handled browns up to 4 pounds with no trouble, something I think most hollow rods could not do as well.
My only advice would be to get the smallest rod that will meet your needs, as they are much more fun to fish, and if you expect to be getting into some larger trout, I would get a better reel with a good drag. I have a Battenkill Barstock for my little rod, and it is one of the only products that Orvis makes which is actually a bargain.
No one has mentioned all the other stuff, like flies and nippers, etc., but you can find tons of stuff online. Often, the best way to get flies is to stop at a shop in the area you are riding and ask for their local recommendations. The last thing I would say is the fluorocarbon leaders have worked better than the older style for me.

Good luck!
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Old 02-03-2012, 09:49 AM   #33
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googling "nippers"
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:06 AM   #34
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LOL. Nippers and zingers - you need both.

Ssevy is right, you can go nuts with gear. On a bike space is limited, so you won't need a lot of gear along. I'm thinking about getting something like a fanny pack or something instead of trying to take a whole fishing vest. I have quite a lot of gear and a couple of vests. They are just so handy though, so I dunno.

A local flyshop can always provide some pattern suggestions for your distination. Fly costs seem to be fairly consistent, a couple'a bucks a piece. A small assortment might make sense for a starting place, seems to me Orvis has something like that at a good price.

And then there's practice. Tie a short length of yarn on your leader and practice casting in a grass field to a target circle. A hula hoop works, but anything can be used as a target. Short and long. On pavement is okay but it wears out your flyline, so not the very best if you intend to also use that line for fishing.

Practice roll casts, mends, high and low back casts, etc. Will make a huge difference out on the water. I always get flys snagged on brush on backcasts, that's my nemisis.

Oh, and you'll need at least one extra spool, two if you're going boat or floattube fishing, for sinking line, sink tip, and floating flylines. Then leaders and tippet. If you get good at tying tippets on then you only have to replace the leader occasionally. Once you've nipped off a couple of feet of your leader you can tie on a couple of feet of tippet.

Many flyshops offer an introductory course for the basics - money well spent. Or if you can hook up with an experienced angler that can help you get started. Either will dramatically reduce frustration out on the water.

I wind and cast with my right hand, so my rods and reels are setup that way. I just transfer the grip to my left hand when I need to wind the reel. All of this needs to become second nature to you so that you can concentrate on casting to fish rather than tending to your gear.
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:25 AM   #35
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I will also recommend an excellent book on fly fishing and fly tying written by Fran Betters, who was famous here in the eastern US. He had a small fly shop in Wilmington NY, and his approach to tying and fishing is absolutely down to earth and practical. I have read dozens of books on fly fishing, and this one is the best. It was out of print for a while, but is now available again. I have tied many of his patterns, and have caught some huge browns on his dry flies, especially the Ausable Wulff and the Usual. His patterns are not just limited to the eastern US either, as the Haystack series is a great generic pattern that can be used anywhere there are mayflies.

http://ausablewulff.com/franflypattern.html
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:33 AM   #36
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My favorite nipper



avaialable here LINK now $16 is a lot to spend on a tool for a guy who just got a rod and reel combo for $25 but I love this thing and have one on each of my "vests".. yes I have more than one.. a rig for saltwater and a rig for freshwater... anyway.. everything you need all in one place... if you buy cheap flies then the needle on the end is an absolute must.. and the once or twice a year I need to tie a nail knot..that tool is indespensable... I honestly dont ever use the hook sharpener because I always lose my flies before they become dull
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:41 AM   #37
KG6BWS
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googling "nippers"
For starting out a pair of toenail clippers works just fine. Ive been fishing my whole life and only recently bought an actual nipper. Just for cutting tippet and trimming the tag end nice and close after you tie on a new fly.
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:49 AM   #38
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Here we go...this is what I need for the bike. $59
BTW, they have a really good sale going on right now for flies.


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Old 02-03-2012, 11:44 AM   #39
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Holy Wah! This could escalate into me becoming a gear slut quickly
I'm going to look up that book, and I'm off to the library after entering this reply.

Hauling stuff locally within a 100 miles or so for a day trip on the bike won't be a problem. I've got a Hack. I do want to keep it frugal for big trips like Idaho this summer, and future LD excursions. So size does matter.

I've got a spin cast trail rod/reel combo and I'll likely bring that along also. I used to be pretty good at plunking in the smallest Mepps spinners in fast deep pools in tiny streams up in the U.P. (loved the little known Tacoosh), or floating a bit of nightcrawler downstream, but alas, that was back in 1980 ish. Been ice-fishing for the last 15 yrs, but very little else.

So thanks to you guys, I've got a bid in on a Phlueger 1494 and I'm looking at some other rods, notably the Grey's Stremflex series, but I'm going to wait and see before shelling out more for better equipment. I think that will happen, but not right now. Going to find a class maybe, and a book definitely.
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Old 02-03-2012, 12:08 PM   #40
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learning fly fishing

Lots of good vids on youtube, just search 'fly casting'.

The neat thing about flyfishing is that it is so much more productive than bait casting. In my younger days I did a lot of backpacking in the PNW, Cascade mountains and high lakes. You could see large schools of trout circling out there in crystal clear water. I started bringing my fishing rod and would cast an egg or bait out there and several fish would always swim up to it but then they would turn around without striking. That's when I decided I had to learn flyfishing.

It's quite entertaining in its own right.

Later I built a classic wooden skiff for oar or sail, and we would fish the lakes in eastern Washington. Was always a lot of fun, very peaceful. Even the wife liked to go. When the wind picked up we'd stow the rods, hoist the sails, and crack open a beer.
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Old 02-03-2012, 01:27 PM   #41
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Which of these two rods?

For all you pro's out there, I'm still thinking about buying this Echo 'Trip' rod for $128, but I just bought the used Redington so I'm in a bit of a quandry. Which do you think I'd be most happy with?

I prefer a 5wt as a universal, but the 6wt is okay, just more punch for getting out from a lakeside shore. I have to buy some new flyline anyway, so I can spool my reel to suit. Either would fit on the bike.

Echo 9' 5wt 8pc




Redington 9' 6wt 5pc

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Old 02-03-2012, 01:40 PM   #42
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The 6wt in and of itself has no more "punch" than the 5 wt IMHO. I can throw the whole fly line with my 3 weigth T&T and my 10wt Scott,, both reaching the same distance... "punch" will come from matching your stroke with the right rod and the right line. Only thing the 5wt does over the 5wt is give you theoretically a bit more backbone to fight bigger fish.
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Old 02-03-2012, 02:07 PM   #43
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They are both budget rods. The Echo is obviously many years newer (at least I think so) and thus probaby has a faster action. Not necessarily a good thing for me. And I worry about all the ferrules, most likely source of trouble.

I'm more interested if anyone has experience with one or both brands to say if one is vastly better than the other. My take is they are probably more similar than different.

BTW, I noticed the Echo has one-legged guides, and a carbon fiber reel seat, verses the true snake guides on the Red, and a nice hardwood reelseat. The bag that comes with the Echo is pretty cool.
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Old 02-03-2012, 02:59 PM   #44
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My favorite nipper


My favorite nipper is made by Abel...

hey browneye: mrt10x is correct, line weight makes no difference to your ability to "punch line out further. A faster action is usually the ticket for trying to get extra distance, though it will feel slower when you have more line out. Even out here in the West where we battle a lot of wind and big open rivers, most guys prefer a 5wt for rivers. Stick with the lightest line you can, to minimize the disruption on the water when the line lands. A higher line weight will help when the winds are whipping though (gotta throw a tight loop with it though).
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Old 02-03-2012, 03:02 PM   #45
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They are both budget rods. The Echo is obviously many years newer (at least I think so) and thus probaby has a faster action. Not necessarily a good thing for me. And I worry about all the ferrules, most likely source of trouble.

I'm more interested if anyone has experience with one or both brands to say if one is vastly better than the other. My take is they are probably more similar than different.

BTW, I noticed the Echo has one-legged guides, and a carbon fiber reel seat, verses the true snake guides on the Red, and a nice hardwood reelseat. The bag that comes with the Echo is pretty cool.
The rods are similar in quality. The carbon fiber reel seat makes no difference, just a gimmick...unless you have the butt sitting in the water all day in a float tube rod holder, it will not crack like some wood inserts that may absorb too much water.

The single foot guides work just as well as snake guides, but to truly explore what they do to a rod is whole different discussion.
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