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Old 02-20-2012, 09:12 AM   #31
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We somehow ended up in the middle of their market place. It was a smelly, messy, and busy little maize of a place and we rode round and round, not sure how to get out of this place. It had a colourless, squalid and medieval appearance. There was much scowling on the already unfriendly faces and they appeared irritated with us as they had to move aside for us to pass. We recognised one of the officers from Customs and he indicated to us which exit to take. It was a relief when we finally popped out onto a tar road and headed out from this hostile town towards lake Tanganyika once again.

We descended from the mountains down a lovely pass with stunning views of the lake. The steep hillsides resembled a patchwork of all shades of greens and browns. They had utilized every bit of available land to plant bananas, maize, sweet potato and manioc (tuber from a Cassava Tree).



We started to relax as we approached the lake and the people appeared friendlier with much waving and calling out of ‘mzungu’. We had an awesome ride following the shoreline north to Bujumburu as one village blended into the next. There was a well armed military presence all along the road who fortunately showed no interest in us.
































As we approached Bujumburu we found a car wash and decided to treat ourselves to a bike wash. The bikes were caked in mud and with mine being air cooled, we were concerned about it overheating. They were delighted to see us and immediately stopped what they were doing and attended to our bikes. There was much laughter and joking going on.










It wasn’t long before we were on our way again heading for the northern suburbs of the town looking for accommodation. Travelling on the right hand side of the road was a bit more difficult in town, especially with the home time traffic. We also became confused when entering and exiting the circles, made a few blunders and irritated a few drivers. Some people had a kind of death wish as they would overtake when they shouldn’t, stressing us out even more! As a result we settled for the first accommodation we could find as we were quite flustered on these busy roads. There was no camping available at Karera Beach Hotel so we paid $70 ( R560) for a double story cylindrical shaped chalet. Kingsley was so uptight by now that he battled to enjoy the rest of our stay.

“This city desert makes you feel so cold
It’s got so many people but it’s got no soul.”

Gerry Rafferty















We needed some cash and were directed to the Hotel Club du Lac Tanganyika, about a kilometre away, where we bumped into some South Africans from Pretoria and decided to stay and have dinner at the outdoor restaurant while listening to some lovely live music.

Looking forward to crossing over into RWANDA tomorrow.
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Old 02-20-2012, 07:44 PM   #32
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What a great trip report , now to convince my wife.
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Old 02-21-2012, 09:32 AM   #33
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What a great trip report , now to convince my wife.
Probably best not to show her the pictures of the mud...
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Old 02-23-2012, 10:49 AM   #34
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RWANDA



BUJUMBURU(Burundi) to KIBUYE (Rwanda)

Day 10: Monday 19 December
Distance: 250 km
Time: 6.15 am – 3.30 pm


Sunrise found us filling up with fuel with our last francs and this early morning start had us weaving our way through motorbikes, bicycles and pedestrians northwards to the Ruha Border Post. The narrow western margin bordering the Rusizi River, which marks the Congo border, lies in the trough of the Great Rift Valley and it is along this narrow strip of flat plain that we travelled all the way north to Rwanda.

We were surprised to meet up with such heavy traffic this early, but everyone was on a mission and heading somewhere important on motorbikes and bicycles loaded with bananas, coal, wood, sweet potatoes, grass, thatch, poles and passengers. You really had to concentrate to avoid all this as well as the cattle, bad patches of pot holes and road works. It was quite nerve wracking.






A BURIAL SIGHT









We breathed a sigh of relief as we departed Burundi and entered Rwanda. The whole vibe changed and we immediately relaxed. It didn’t cost us a penny to get into Rwanda. All along the road we were greeted with loud shouts of ‘mzungu’ and friendly waves. It really felt good being here.



We travelled along good tar roads really enjoying our surroundings. One thing we were very aware of was taking photos of people. They generally don’t like it and express their annoyance if no permission had been asked. As a result, it’s usually a quick click of the camera to try and capture some memories. Rwanda has a tropical climate and December was supposedly part of their short dry season but there was still evidence of lots of rains as the Rusizi River was in full flow on its way from Lake Kivu to Lake Tanganyika.






AN EARLY MORNING MARKET



What really impressed us were the lush green tea plantations that spread out over the hills, valleys and drained marshes. They were beautifully maintained and harvested. Tea is playing a key role in rebuilding the economy after the devastating effects of the 1994 genocide. The high mountains, fertile soils and cool climates are perfect ingredients for producing tea that is exported all over the world.




We managed to ride around the outskirts of Kamemba/Cyangugu (name depends on the map you’re using) and got our first sighting of Lake Kivu. From the little we saw it appeared to be a lovely place with plush houses overlooking the lake and more being built on the banks of the lake. This was all surrounded by the dramatic forest covered mountains of the rift valley giving it a lovely magical setting.




LOOKS LIKE SOMETHING OUT OF TRANSYLVANIA








A BOAT BUILDING YARD
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:08 AM   #35
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There was a lot of road construction as we left this area so we slowed down considerably as we were now vying for road space. There are no “stop/go’s” and it was up to each individual to negotiate a way through the chaos. It was a matter of dodging graders, front end loaders and on coming traffic so a lot of quick thinking and responses were required which was aggravated by having to ride on the right /wrong side of the road.

Shortly after leaving Kamemba we took a left turn and headed north following the eastern lake shore. Once again we passed through some stunning tea plantations with intermittent views of a very pretty Lake Kivu with its irregular shores forming numerous inlets and peninsulas and with little islands dotting the lake shore, creating a very picturesque setting.


































These colourful little feet always got my attention.


As the day progressed so the roads became windier and zig-zagged through the many mountains. When we observed this route on ‘google-earth’ it looked an exciting route with its left-to-right zig-zags but what we failed to observe were the up-downs, up-downs and more up-downs, mountain after mountain after mountain - it was like riding on a roller-coaster. We soon discovered why Rwanda is referred to as “THE LAND OF A THOUSAND HILLS”.

Kingsley was also battling without his rear brakes and fortunately he had sorted out my front breaks in Bujumburu that had leaked fluid after one of my offs.

The occasional muddy corner was thrown in just to add some more excitement and keep us alert. Being ahead of me meant that Kingsley would have to wait for me to get through the mud but because of the tight corners he wouldn’t always be able to see but he would always hear my bike slowly working its way through the mud and bad patches.........he said it was liked being stalked by an old Lister generator.

We stopped regularly for a rest and to take photies.











Exhausted and hungry we arrived at Kibuye late that afternoon - a lovely friendly little town. Both Burundi and Rwanda ATM’s wouldn’t accept our Visa/Master credit cards so I had to go into the bank and exchange dollars for francs. As tourists are still a novelty here quite a crowd of motorbike taxi drivers had gathered around Kingsley and he was demonstrating to them how to use a GPS. They were fascinated by this little piece equipment.

After checking out the Eden Hotel and another nearby place we ended up at the Hotel Bethanie which boasted beautiful lake frontage. There was only a hand full of guests in this lovely resort.
I promptly collapsed on the bed, exhausted and with an extremely swollen left ankle. Kingsley immediately went and booked us in for two nights. This would give my leg a rest and we could catch up with some washing. What a treat. This was an amazing place to have a rest day.

From our verandah we looked out onto Lake Kivu with all its little islands and surrounding forests. This was a little patch of paradise in the middle of East Africa.



KINGSLEY ENJOYING A BEAUTIFUL BEER WITH A BEAUTIFUL VIEW


YOU CAN SEE HOW SWOLLEN THE FOOT ON THE RIGHT IS.

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Old 02-23-2012, 11:19 AM   #36
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REST DAY at KIBUYE


Day 11: Tuesday 20 December

Enjoyed a lovely late morning, ate a much needed breakfast on the verandah and tried to soak up the beauty that surrounded us. Kingsley really fussed around me as my ankle was really worrying me. After 7 days the swelling had not subsided and I had finished two lots of anti-inflammatories. He promptly went into town to get me more medication while I lazed around resting my leg.










The bad thing about this rest day was that my leg was not being strapped, and supported by my riding boot and as a result there was more swelling. I had been using an ankle guard but due to ignorance I stopped using it thinking “....it will get better soon”. Only once I got home, 3 weeks later, I discovered, after having an x-ray, I had actually broken the fibia right down by the ankle. This meant wearing a ‘moon boot’ for 6 weeks. No wonder the swelling never subsided. Perhaps it was a good thing that I didn’t know it was broken as I don’t know how this would have affected the rest of the trip.




THE ARROW POINTS TO THE BREAK

After lunch we enjoyed a lovely swim in the clean, warm waters of the lake. Steep terraced hills lead down to the lake shore in this area so there is no beach here but they have prepared an area for easy access into the lake. The lake bed sits upon a rift valley that is slowly being pulled apart, causing volcanic activity in the area, making it particularly deep – a maximum depth of 480 m. It is the largest of all the Rwandan lakes with a length of 89 km and a width of 48 km. The worlds’ tenth-largest inland island – Idjwi, lies in Lake Kivu.











A lovely storm built up over the northern mountains........the same ones that we were meant to be riding the following day and this only meant one thing .......MORE MUD!!!

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Old 02-25-2012, 10:31 AM   #37
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Wow, all that riding on a busted ankle, what a champ!

Enjoying the report immensely!
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Old 02-25-2012, 01:18 PM   #38
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Great report!

Thanks for taking us along your journey. Looking forward to the rest!

Hope your ankle is feeling better now....
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Old 02-26-2012, 06:55 AM   #39
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Love the report!!! Great pics!
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Old 02-29-2012, 12:01 AM   #40
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UGANDA


KIBUYE (Rwanda) to RUHIJA (Uganda)
Day 12: Wednesday 21 December
Distance: 249 km
Time: 5.30 am – 5.30 pm


“ Hit the road before its light,
Trying to catch an hour on the sun.”
Neil Young




Map of Route ~ Kibuye to Ruhija (Uganda) to Queen Elizabeth National park

Feeling rested we left Kibuye before the sun could greet the day. We had a long day ahead of us which included a border crossing and any other unexpected surprises. The 94 km to Gisenyi was much the same as Mondays ride. It was just as windy with some stony patches thrown in but fortunately there wasn’t the mud we had anticipated........ the going was slow never the less. This section took us 4 hrs but included the stops at the Genocide Memorials.













One section reminded me of the Natal Midlands back home with lush green pastures and dairy cows grazing with an early morning mist hanging around.





The Tea Plantations never ceased to impress me. The scenery was spectacular.






Apologies about the poor quality of stitching







Some readers might be aware that Rwanda is associated with the horrific events that unfolded in 1994. They experienced one of the most savage genocides in history. In 1994 an estimated 800 000 Rwanda Tutsis were killed in just 3 months by the Hutu extremists. About 3 million people fled to refugee camps in neighbouring Tanzania, Congo and Uganda. These genocide memorials are a reminder of this terrible event and Rwanda is still in the process of recovery.











When planning this trip we were unsure about travelling in this area as one hears and reads conflicting reports about the country and its problems. After a fair amount of reading and research on the security and stability in the country we decided, despite tourists still being a novelty, that we would be OK. Our decision to visit Rwanda was a good one as we had a safe journey and thoroughly enjoyed it.
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Old 02-29-2012, 12:17 AM   #41
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We were now in the north western corner of Rwanda and were heading in the direction of Cyanika Border Post . For a long distance we skirted the Volcanoes National Park which was on our left. This park borders the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It is known as a haven for the mountain gorillas and was the base for the zoologist, Dian Fossey, to carry out her research into the gorillas and was widely credited with saving the gorillas from extinction. Sadly she was murdered in 1985 by unknown assailants and is now buried within the park.
For many years this park was declared unsafe for tourists to visit and only back in 1999 was it deemed safe and under control. Although there have since been occasional infiltrations by Rwandan rebels.







MUHABURA VOLCANOE ~ VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK

Sometime after midday we arrived at the Rwandan/Ugandan Border Post





It was here that one of the Rwanda Officials gave us a bit of trouble and called us into a little hut and requested all our paper work. He wanted our bike insurance and we presented him with our Cross Country Insurance which was not what he wanted but we managed to convince him was suffice. He then wanted a Comesa ( International Insurance), which we didn’t have and we informed him we didn’t need it. He was obviously trying to intimidate us so that we would offer him bribe money but we remained calm and pleasant and hung around until he didn’t know what to do with us anymore and eventually he let us pass into Uganda.

We saw two other motorcyclists.....also covered in mud and riding what looked like local bikes. Unfortunately we didn’t get an opportunity to chat as they were leaving Uganda. At 2.15 pm we managed to leave the border and headed for Kisora. We were relieved to discover that we were allowed to travel on the left side of the road again which was beautifully tarred. The ATMs weren’t working in Kisoro and the banks wouldn’t exchange our money as there was some problem inside as well. We wasted a stressful hour here trying to buy money on the black market. We finally refuelled and headed for the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest – about 90 km further.
As we wound our way up and out of the valley we encountered more road works but were also treated to some magnificent views and a scenic route through the bamboo and montane forests of the Echuya Forest Reserve ~ also popular with birdwatchers. It was difficult to stop and take photos due to all the road works and shortage of time.





View of the northern tip of Lake Bunyonyi which has also become a popular tourist destination.

Finally, the sign to Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. We were heading for Ruhija, our final 26 km for the day.





It was a spectacular ride and it is quite obvious were the cultivated land and forest formed a dividing line.





Bwindi is a true rainforest, spread over a series of steep ridges and valleys that form the eastern edge of the Albertine Rift Valley. It was so uplifting riding through these magnificent trees and awesome scenery. We had to negotiate a few more muddy patches and passed a crowd of birding tourists walking along the road. However this 26 km dragged on for about another hour and a half.

















ARRIVING AT RUHIJA WAS QUITE A THRILL

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Old 02-29-2012, 12:30 AM   #42
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We were residents here so didn’t have to pay the $30 park entrance fee .....thank goodness. About a km after the park entrance a right turn took us through the untidy little village of Ruhija. We ended up staying at the Ruhija Gorilla Lodge which boasts a terrific view across the forest towards the Virungas and the Rift Valley. Initially they were fully booked and there were no camping facilities. We could have ridden to other resorts but we were now so tired and reluctant to get back on the bikes. The manager was so pleasant and accommodating and kindly allowed us a small room with a non functioning communal bathroom as they were still in the process of being built. This was only a short walk away from the main building. We were delighted, despite the fact that we once again had to wash out of a bucket as there was no running water. But who cares....we were finally in Bwindi and tomorrow is a big day for me......... I was going Gorilla tracking!









Our little room



Enjoying another home cooked meal.

Later that evening we went up to the rustic pub and restaurant and bumped into a party of 8 tourists who were on a birding safari. One of the elderly couples was from our home town – talk about a small world. We enjoyed the rest of the evening relaxing and swopping travel stories.


BWINDI IMPENETRABLE FOREST ~ REST DAY
Day 13: Thursday 23 December

An early wake up and an early breakfast was necessary as I had to get to the park office to secure a permit. I can’t believe that the moment I had been waiting for, for so long, had finally arrived. I was very fortunate to get this permit but I am embarrassed to tell you that it cost me $500!!!!! According to my knowledge it was meant to be $300 but obviously all the info I was reading was outdated – so much for my research.



There are 2 groups of gorillas at Ruhija, the Bitukuru and the Oruzogo and only 8 tourists are allowed to track each group. One group of tourists arrived late so they allowed me to buy a permit, thinking they were not arriving, and I was initially going to be on my own tracking the Bitukuru group. They eventually did arrive, so now we had a party of 9.....I was very fortunate that they allowed me to continue.
This was the most amazing moment of my adventure through Africa. I didn’t care about my sore ankle.....I just had to do this. I had a handful of pain killers and anti-inflammatories and I was ready to go.

Our guides name was Obed and he prepped us on the gorillas and their conservation as well as other interesting information.

With a strong walking stick in hand I was finally on my way to seeing these amazing creatures – thanks to Dian Fossey. We squashed into a taxi that had brought the rest of the group from Lake Bunyonyi and drove a couple of kilometres down the road where we started the hike. We followed a pathway down a steep hill through dense bush. There were two armed guides up front and one at the back. About an hour later we stopped for a rest and for the guide to get his bearing on where the group was. The going was good and I immediately thought ‘this is cool, it’s going to be easy.’ Hahahaha.... what a joke!!!









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Old 02-29-2012, 12:41 AM   #43
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The Bwindi forest is a 300 km square island of dense vegetation and accommodates 340 of the 700 mountain gorillas that are left in the world. The rest live in the Virunga and Volcanoes Forests. A troop is made up of 2 – 40 members and their home-range is about 10 – 30 km square which does overlap with other groups. They move up to a kilometre a day, depending on food availability. The Bitukuru group, that we were tracking, was made up of 13 members - 4 silverbacks (adult males), 3 black backs ( juvenile males), 4 females and 2 babies.

After our rest we were taken off the main pathway and the two guides were using their machetes to hack a pathway for us. We crashed through so much dense bush with thorny stems grabbing at our sleeves and hands, tripping over roots, slipping into holes, vines hooking around our ankles and ants trying to find any exposed flesh to pinch. This all took place on the 45 degree slopes that we had to work our way up and down, up and down for about another 2 hours. I was at the back of the queue and managed to keep up despite a swollen and painful ankle. I was determined to see these guys. There was much sweating, puffing and panting from everyone.










I could smell them before I could see them!

Above us, sitting on the slopes was a magnificent silverback. He just ignored us and continued feeding and stripping leaves from the stems. He was surrounded by flies but appeared unperturbed. We sat there in awe for quite a while........ just watching!! Occasionally he glanced our way to watch us clicking away furious with our cameras. What was amusing about this chap was his finger. He had an old injured middle finger and it appeared that he was giving us a rude message......perhaps inadvertently expressing his true feelings.










HERE HE IS SHOWING OFF HIS BEAUTIFUL SILVER BACK


THIS WAS QUITE AN EMOTIONAL MOMENT.
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Old 02-29-2012, 12:47 AM   #44
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+like!

Hows the leg feeling?
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Old 02-29-2012, 12:55 AM   #45
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We were not allowed to carry our sticks or backpacks as this was seen as a threat to the gorillas, we put them down and moved further up the hill to look for the rest of the group. They were all feeding separately and not interacting in a group.....which was a pity. We were startled by a crashing of branches and undergrowth behind us as a huge silverback rushed down the slopes towards us and performed a mock charge. He stopped just short of us and sent a few people scattering into the bush. He took up an aggressive stance in front of us and then nonchalantly slipped away into the foliage. There was much nervous giggling amongst us.










Below is the eldest gorilla who is no longer the dominant leader of the group. He moved slowly down towards us also making an impressive appearance, sat down and looked at us calmly, showing his age with his scruffy long coat.



A youngster enjoying a quiet moment.










PROBABLY NOT A GOOD MARKETING MOMENT!


We were only allowed an hour to view the group after which we reluctantly headed back to base camp. This only took us about an hour and a half. The last 15 minutes we walked in the pouring rain but we didn’t care as our thoughts were back in the forest with the gorillas.

On return we were handed our ‘Gorilla Tracking Certificates’ and we all headed off back home in different directions.

Being asthmatic meant that Kingsley was unable to partake in this amazing experience but he did have the opportunity to befriend ‘Pretty’ – a local ‘squeezer’- who offered him a massage and a meal!?! He politely declined the offer and appeased her by buying potatoes, onions, tomatoes and bread rolls instead ( have I mentioned these ingredients before.......?).

When I phoned home that evening to share my experience, my son, who had been paranoid about me doing this tracking, had just watched a program on T.V. called “Banged up Abroad” which was a documentary about a group of 30 tourists, of which only 5 survived, who were kidnapped in this same forest in 2005.

Never-the-less, it was a magical experience.....something one only really reads about


LOOKING FORWARD TO TOMORROW AS WE HEAD OFF TO QUEEN ELIZABETH NATIONAL PARK.
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