ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Some Assembly Required
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-19-2012, 04:37 PM   #1
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
CM200 Cafe

This is likely to be a very slow-moving chronicle of my little CM200 project. I picked the bike up last year for $200 from an inmate so that my wife could learn to ride. At some point a previous owner had painted most of the bike with a flat black rattle can, the instrument cluster was missing, the key was broken off in the ignition, and it needed a battery, but the PO said it ran fine.

The first thing I discovered was that a new 6V battery would be crazy expensive, so I replaced it with a capacitor from Radio Shack. After that the bike fired right up and ran fine as advertised. It fit my wife pretty well, except even as low as it is her legs were just a little bit too short, mostly because of how wide the seat is. I needed a project anyway, so away we go.

I want this to be a 555 bike, so everything possible will be scrounged or salvaged. So far I'm into it for $207 (purchase price plus capacitor). The ultimate goal is to have a stripped down little runabout, you know "for the wife".

I wanted to check the valves, and while I was at it I stripped the paint off the cam cover and hit it with a nylon wheel on the bench grinder. No before pictures unfortunately, but here's the after:



The gas tank is a little screwed up where the stock hinged cover has been ripped off so I was on the hunt for a new one. About that same time my uncle's son is cleaning out some junk and comes up with some unidentified chopper frame with a peanut tank. Score! But once I had the tank in hand I realized the tunnel would be way too narrow for the stamped steel backbone of the CM. So I'm just going to figure out a way to dress up the stock tank, but I had a Plan B for the peanut:



You can see the remnants from the tank's previous tenants. I kept waiting for it to burst into flame as I was cutting.



The seat pan will be a scrap of MDO waterproof plywood I had lying around. It needs some shaping yet, but I'm happy with the way the mockup looks so far.



The one place I can see the budget getting blown is lighting. If anyone has suggestions for a low-buck solution for a taillight I'm all ears.
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2012, 05:28 PM   #2
nsu max
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Oddometer: 395
Do you have any specific style of tail light in mind? Any motorcycle shop should be able to get one a small universal tail light for less than $20. Less at a cycle salvage. As for the capasitor, how did you wire that in. I'm kind of dooffuss whit stuff like that. The project looks like fun keep us informed.
nsu max is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2012, 06:25 PM   #3
Daamud
AAAAAYYY!
 
Daamud's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: In the 715, Wisconsin, U.S.A.
Oddometer: 2,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherBart View Post
......The one place I can see the budget getting blown is lighting. If anyone has suggestions for a low-buck solution for a taillight I'm all ears.

Just a thought. Available at just about any gas station/farm store/Autozone ect....



http://www.ryderfleetproducts.com/ry...annelId=-10465
__________________
WARNING: Most things posted above contain sarcasm.
Daamud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2012, 07:07 PM   #4
grizzzly
The Pre-Banned Version
 
grizzzly's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: socorro NM 505-five five zero-2583
Oddometer: 3,252
my brother had several of those while he was in high school he just kept winding up with them, the funny thing is that he was 66 and about 350lbs and his best was 61 and 400lbs.
both of them on the same bike going down the road was a sight
__________________
you actually expect people to take responsibility for their actions in today's society?!

grizzzly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2012, 11:30 PM   #5
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
Quote:
Originally Posted by nsu max View Post
Do you have any specific style of tail light in mind? Any motorcycle shop should be able to get one a small universal tail light for less than $20. Less at a cycle salvage. As for the capasitor, how did you wire that in. I'm kind of dooffuss whit stuff like that. The project looks like fun keep us informed.

Ideally I'd like something that I can mount up under the tail. I've been cruising the Dennis Kirk catalog online, and tomorrow I'll see what Farm and Fleet has to offer.

The capacitor just goes right in in place of the battery. The one I bought had solid wire leads that I wrapped around the bolts through the battery lead terminals. Then I covered over the whole thing with a bicycle inner tube. I'll try to remember to take some pictures and post them up.
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 10:12 AM   #6
nucular
Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Oddometer: 51
Lucas?

You could go with an era-appropriate Lucas style brake/tail light from these guys for $15 (scroll down about half way):

http://newmotorcycleparts.com/electr...ail_light.html



I assume you could use dual element 6V bulbs if those are available?
nucular is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 02:02 PM   #7
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
Farm & Fleet FTW. I picked up two different style taillights (<$6 each) and two different style directionals (<$4 each) to check out, and I'll return the ones I don't use. Plus they had a 6V utility light (sealed beam headlight, complete with bucket) for $14.00. The bucket on the bike is busted and kind of hacked back together, so this will make a very nice replacement.

I have some actual bike turn signals coming from a very generous inmate for the front. With a little bit of luck I might have this thing at least nominally legal by next week, then I can play more with the cosmetics.
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 02:06 PM   #8
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
Quote:
Originally Posted by grizzzly View Post
my brother had several of those while he was in high school he just kept winding up with them, the funny thing is that he was 66 and about 350lbs and his best was 61 and 400lbs.
both of them on the same bike going down the road was a sight
Reminds me of something about monkeys and footballs, but I can't quite put my finger on it...
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 11:14 AM   #9
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
So I might have a bottoming issue...with the flat seat pan there's only about 2.5" between the top of the tire and the bottom of the pan. I'll gain a little space I imagine when I get rid of the knobbies, but I don't know if it will be enough. So now I'm thinking I might have to cut out a section of the pan over the rear tire, which would mean I can't mount the rear taillight bracket to the bottom of the pan like I had planned.

Any other ideas out there?
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 07:20 AM   #10
AtLarge
Gnarly Adventurer
 
AtLarge's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Oddometer: 125
Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherBart View Post
The capacitor just goes right in in place of the battery. The one I bought had solid wire leads that I wrapped around the bolts through the battery lead terminals. Then I covered over the whole thing with a bicycle inner tube. I'll try to remember to take some pictures and post them up.
Very interested in this for my 6v. Not really expensive, just would be nice to be maintenance free. Part number too if you can please. Good luck with the rebuild.
__________________
1973 CL70-K3
1983 KZ750-K1
2008 GSX1300-BKK8 #1120
Cardo Scala rider G4 PowerSet
AtLarge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 12:09 PM   #11
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtLarge View Post
Very interested in this for my 6v. Not really expensive, just would be nice to be maintenance free. Part number too if you can please. Good luck with the rebuild.
I don't have a clue about the part number, but it looked exactly like this. I'm sure it will go bad eventually, but for seven bucks I can keep a few spares on hand if that becomes necessary. Of course the downside of using a capacitor in place of the battery is that your lights won't stay on if the bike isn't running. That may technically not be legal for street use, and it's probably not very safe if you ride at night and end up on the side of the road with a flat or something. But this bike will just be an around-town daytime cruiser, so I wasn't concerned about any of that.
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2012, 07:29 PM   #12
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
Well I finally made some progress over the past few weeks. First I laid out the seat base on some 1/2" MDO (waterproof plywood).



Cut out, with a couple of t-nuts and the hump roughly in place:



And a bulkhead in the hump that I'll use later to attach an upholstered pad:



It was about this point when I realized I was going to have a big problem with the wheel hitting the bottom of the pan if the shocks compressed much at all. So I went back to the drawing board and figured out a way to re-mount the original fender. It ended up getting bobbed pretty thoroughly so it's completely unseen, but gives the suspension room to work.





Then to start working on a taillight bracket:









Today I managed to finish the bracket, get the lights mounted, and do the wiring. The wiring isn't as tidy as I'd like, but I'm eventually planning on ditching the airbox and making a shallow tray under the seat to house all the electronics, I figure I can re-do some things then.



Cost-wise, the plywood and steel for the bracket were scrap I had laying around. The taillight was $8 and the turn signals were $4 each. Figure maybe $10 for the t-nuts, assorted hardware, wire and connectors. You can see in the background of that last picture the foam I bought for the seat. That and some batting set me back $15. So all told now I'm up to roughly $250 spent. That's half my budget!
TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2012, 09:10 AM   #13
GlassAnkles
Chip to Queso Ratio
 
GlassAnkles's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Oddometer: 1,792
tail section looks really good, keep it up! and keep the cost down!
GlassAnkles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2012, 08:12 AM   #14
TheOtherBart OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,870
Slow, slow progress

I finally got around to upholstering the seat. I think I mentioned before that I had to buy foam and batting, but I made the cover out of a black leather trenchcoat I picked up at Goodwill years ago for just a couple bucks. I knew that material would come in handy eventually.





It's nowhere near perfect...which for this project, is perfect. Then it sat idle for a looong time, until my aunt and uncle came to visit for a weekend. It just isn't a weekend with my uncle if we're not tinkering on something in the garage, so this little thing got wheeled back out from the corner and butchered.

The mufflers were big, heavy, ugly, and rusted through. The idea was to cut them off and build baffles right in the header. Once we had the mufflers cut off though we found that the entire exhaust was double-wall tubing. That meant we had to cut another chunk off of the header to get the inner tube out to make room for the baffles, then I'll have the headers welded back up.

I'm making the baffles out of common copper plumbing parts, a couple of reducers and a short length of pipe. The pipe will be drilled and then wrapped in steel wool before being installed. But you get the idea.





Getting rid of those mufflers meant we could also get rid of the big brackets that carried them and the passenger pegs. The starter was disabled when I got the bike (think melted wires in the headlight bucket, and the wire from the starter button snipped so that no one tried to use it), so why carry the extra weight of the starter? And then of course you don't need the starter cable, or the relay...here's most of the weight that we shed (one muffler and the starter cable had already made it into the recycle bin).



I don't have a scale, but between all that and the big steel seat pan this thing is significantly lighter.

Once I get the exhaust done I'll fire it up just to see what it sounds like. But then the next step is to ditch the airbox in favor of a pod filter. That part will be relatively straightforward, but the part that worries me is the jetting. Obviously it will probably be running lean between the intake and exhaust mods, and the pilot jet is pressed in and not replaceable. I could probably drill it out, but I'm mulling over the possibility of swapping carbs. That will be some extra work because this carb has a flange that mates up with two studs on the head, so anything I swap to that uses a regular boot will require some fab work. Nothing major, but something else to tinker with.

I may never put 500 miles on this thing...and I don't care. I'm having a great time just dragging the thing out and having my way with her whenever I get the chance. Add in the ~$20 for the plumbing parts and my outlay is up to $270. And as she sits right now:

TheOtherBart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2012, 04:30 PM   #15
DisorganizedVince
Adventurer
 
DisorganizedVince's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Location: South West England
Oddometer: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherBart View Post
I finally got around to upholstering the seat. I think I mentioned before that I had to buy foam and batting, but I made the cover out of a black leather trenchcoat I picked up at Goodwill years ago for just a couple bucks. I knew that material would come in handy eventually.





It's nowhere near perfect...which for this project, is perfect. Then it sat idle for a looong time, until my aunt and uncle came to visit for a weekend. It just isn't a weekend with my uncle if we're not tinkering on something in the garage, so this little thing got wheeled back out from the corner and butchered.

The mufflers were big, heavy, ugly, and rusted through. The idea was to cut them off and build baffles right in the header. Once we had the mufflers cut off though we found that the entire exhaust was double-wall tubing. That meant we had to cut another chunk off of the header to get the inner tube out to make room for the baffles, then I'll have the headers welded back up.

I'm making the baffles out of common copper plumbing parts, a couple of reducers and a short length of pipe. The pipe will be drilled and then wrapped in steel wool before being installed. But you get the idea.





Getting rid of those mufflers meant we could also get rid of the big brackets that carried them and the passenger pegs. The starter was disabled when I got the bike (think melted wires in the headlight bucket, and the wire from the starter button snipped so that no one tried to use it), so why carry the extra weight of the starter? And then of course you don't need the starter cable, or the relay...here's most of the weight that we shed (one muffler and the starter cable had already made it into the recycle bin).



I don't have a scale, but between all that and the big steel seat pan this thing is significantly lighter.

Once I get the exhaust done I'll fire it up just to see what it sounds like. But then the next step is to ditch the airbox in favor of a pod filter. That part will be relatively straightforward, but the part that worries me is the jetting. Obviously it will probably be running lean between the intake and exhaust mods, and the pilot jet is pressed in and not replaceable. I could probably drill it out, but I'm mulling over the possibility of swapping carbs. That will be some extra work because this carb has a flange that mates up with two studs on the head, so anything I swap to that uses a regular boot will require some fab work. Nothing major, but something else to tinker with.

I may never put 500 miles on this thing...and I don't care. I'm having a great time just dragging the thing out and having my way with her whenever I get the chance. Add in the ~$20 for the plumbing parts and my outlay is up to $270. And as she sits right now:

That bike's looking real nice, can't wait to see this finished
__________________
Present bike - 1980 Suzuki GSX250
DisorganizedVince is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014