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Old 04-14-2012, 06:47 AM   #181
rydnseek
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That's a tough section by the bridge, Dave. Aztom was talking about it, wondering how in the world you came 'up' that section with a loaded bike with sm tires.. evidently, you didn't. We've always done the ride from the other way.. going down that rocky mess. gravity helps with that.

But it sounds like you had a fun ride.. that is still a nice section of trail, & it was nice that 'dead man's wash' was packed down & the boulder field was flattened a bit. That can be very nasty, too.

Sorry we missed you when you were here in az! I know you were on a mission & had places to go. Hope it's good in ak for you now!


edit: Here's a link to the ride we did a cpl yrs ago..

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=580601

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Old 04-14-2012, 07:27 AM   #182
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Dave, Dave, Dave, if only I would have known of you plan I would have ridden out to the bridge & met you & between us we would have got the bike to the top. Then you could have followed me to Prescott for a home cooked dinner by Chef Paula, a comfortable bed, bike repair & on your way next day. Always the 20/20 hindsight right A+++ for effort on that one. Big Dog & Ding Weed did it in the south to north direction that you tried a couple years back on their WR's & with two of them were able to make it. Glad you made it to your destination safely. I think your story & accomplishment is magazine worthy. Hope somebody picks up on it. Good luck in your new life adventure.
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Old 04-14-2012, 03:58 PM   #183
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Dave, this is one awesome ride report! Please keep it coming!
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:40 PM   #184
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WHO'S Skierd ?

It's certainly not you. Curious how you got that handle. BraveButt sounds more real, riding the itle-bity bike in the winter and solo. Your EasternTAT report was one of the first I read when I discoverd ADV. Always a great adventure! Thanks alot. I bought my WRR last week and am proud to be a new member of the dual sport family. Will take my initiation ride end of this month in Moab. Celebrate Alaska













s
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Old 04-14-2012, 06:52 PM   #185
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His handle isn't a play on "scared". It would actually be pronounced "Skier - D" as in Skier Dave.

The guy was born with snow skis on his feet. The kind that can ski better than they walk......and then some!

Alas....if he could just ride a motorcycle as good as he could ski, then the hill up to the Sheep Bridge would have been mere child's play.

But, watch-out if this dude every mounts those motorcycle skis on his bike. Cyborg, you need to send him one of those photos of the Snow-berg. I think that should be his winter project in Alaska......WRR to WRX to WRS (S for snow).

HF

p.s. That's some gutsy solo riding down there in the desert, Dave. Hhhhmmmm....kinda risky
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:44 PM   #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFive View Post
His handle isn't a play on "scared". It would actually be pronounced "Skier - D" as in Skier Dave.

The guy was born with snow skis on his feet. The kind that can ski better than they walk......and then some!

But, watch-out if this dude every mounts those motorcycle skis on his bike. Cyborg, you need to send him one of those photos of the Snow-berg. I think that should be his winter project in Alaska......WRR to WRX to WRS (S for snow).

HF
[/img]

Gotta have more ponies than a WR250X to run one of these sled tracks...
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Old 04-15-2012, 04:50 PM   #187
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Yeah, overall it was 100% worth it to try it and I'm glad I went. That's such a cool little ride to have so close to the city and yet so out there. Getting down that way definitely would have been doable. Hell, getting up it would have been doable had I been a bit more proactive with planning ahead but...

Over the course of various cross country trips back in the day, I've crossed the Mohave desert 4-5 times and somehow always at night. I've never actually seen it. Today, that would change.

Thursday March 22

Left Needles on historic Rt 66 (pre 1937 alignment) and headed towards Goff and the Mohave preserve with the hopes of doing some desert explorin'. Shortly out of town I came across a honey stand with free samples





So yummy...

Through the nearly-a-ghosttown of Goff, I headed out into the gravel and sand roads of the Preserve unsure really where I was headed or what I was looking for. I had a few way points marked in the park that I got from Mark (BigDog) that looked intriguing but the general idea of the day was to just wander and explore in a northwesterly direction. The main roads were hard packed graded gravel... the smaller roads were deep sandy two track that I really had no business being on lol. Some places were rutted out badly and full of deep sand and I quickly grew tired of the sand and dodging cacti. I thought I had taken some pictures but they're not on my camera or phone, so I guess I didn't, but it looked a lot like what I've seen of Baja. Lots of sand, lots of big whoops, lots of sand, and some occasional rocks.

Back on to main roads, I followed signs to another cool cabin







It was beautiful and quiet out here, and I could see living here if I had running water and a/c in summer lol.

I got a little lost again leaving the Rock House but generally followed established trails and roads. I was surprised at how many cars and trucks I saw out here as I wasn't expecting to see much of anyone. To be fair, they seemed equally surprised to me so lol. On one of the roads I came up on a car with the doors and trunk open and a man and old woman standing next to the car. I slowed down as I passed and asked if they needed a hand. "Nope, we're just pulled off to have a picnic." Ah ok cool, have a good... "Hey, you want a beer?"

Hell yeah I want a beer! The man was taking his mother out to see the grown grandkids out in California or something like that and both decided the best way to do it was to rent a car and drive, staying on back roads and just seeing everything. Very very cool. Shared a couple Sam Adams with them, they fed me some of the rotisserie chicken they had in the trunk for lunch, and enjoyed a little desert roadside picnic. Why not?

As I looked into the distance, I noticed that the road I was on intersected a paved road... but then continued straight out into the desert, winding along like a sandy snake to the horizon. It looked like the direction I wanted to head-ish and I had plenty of gas and there was a town at the other end, so instead of pavement I kept going straight on the Mohave Road.



This is about 8 miles in to it and was one of the nicer sections. You can see the road continuing off into the distance. Most of it was DEEP DEEP whoops, and utterly exhausting to ride on my loaded up street bike. It went on like this for about 30 miles, where it split off and continued like this for probably another 40 or 50 miles. I turned and followed another sandy bit of two track to the base of a mountain where I had a waypoint for a spring. Sure enough there was a spring there, but all that really marked it was a clump of lush tall grasses, a small tree, and a water trough for livestock.

I loathed going back on that road, back the way I came, and did not want to continue on it out into the desert, so instead I followed the cut off I took from the spring towards the road I crossed early and towards the town of Kelso. 5 miles later, the road ended at a Wilderness marker stating that everything beyond this was now federally designated wilderness, no vehicles allowed. Fuck. Fuck fuck fuck. My GPS showed it to be about 10 miles or so back to the main road... ok go for it, how bad could it be?

Bad. Real bad. Real real bad. The sand was deep enough that I didn't need the kickstand when I got tired. The 'road' devolved into a sandy wash and eventually split, several miles in, at a large rock outcrop and continued in both directions. I was too far in at this point to turn around... then I spotted powerlines on wooden posts. Where there's utilities, there's a utility road, and that has to lead back to a real road and/or a town eventually... I cut across the open desert and eventually made it to the powerlines, and followed it down a 15 mile long sandy two track path back to the main road... I've never been so happy to be back on pavement. The closer 'roads' I had seen on my GPS had been long closed in reality and effectively did not exist. This was probably the dumbest thing I did on this trip, possibly ever on a motorcycle. I thought I learned not to go down random closed roads and trails on my TAT trip or that one time in Western MD when I ended up on the wrong side of a guard rail after bushwacking through the woods, but I guess I needed a reminder.

I ended up in the town of Kelso, and ate at the train station. Cool little place for sure.



Chili dog!


Back on the pavement, I headed north towards Death Valley with slim hopes of making it to a campground before dark.

Another cool park near the Valley


Shortly before sunset I came to the town of Shoshone. There I found a gas ($5.70/gal for premium) and a campground that was cheap and had a pool fed by a warm spring, and a bar to get breakfast and dinner. Good enough, close enough, no reason to push it further today. Grubbed, soaked, and slept like a baby.
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:54 PM   #188
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HighFive

Thanks for the imfo on Skierds' name. All that swooshing on the snow should somehow translate over to swooshing street tires on the sand don't ya think? Maybe some special wax rubbed on the tires
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:24 PM   #189
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No wax, just a lot of stupid. Not unlike my skiing days.

Friday March 23.

"Yea, though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I will fear no evil."

Up relatively early, got breakfast at the town diner, and left Shoshone on Jubilee Pass Road (2500ft elevation) and dropped down to Badwater Road, heading to the lowest place on the continent, Badwater Basin. The road through the valley was mildly interesting, as instead of burning straight across the playa it hugged the cliff walls on the east side of the valley. The wind and temperatures kept things interesting too, as did the traffic as there were more than a few RV's and other family sized vehicles out and about on the road. Guess that's what I get for coming on a weekend when its still pleasant in the Valley? On a rare straight and empty stretch, I did manage to top the bike out in 6th gear finally, at 93.9mph banging off the rev limiter. The shorter rear tire and gearing definitely helped, dunno if she'd be able to do the ton or not but its nice to know I've used all of the available motor at least once.

It's all uphill from here...




See the sign on the cliff above the bike? That's sea level.


More at Badwater Basin
















I had to chuckle when I saw a foreign tourist reach over the side of the walkway to grab a handful of water from the badwater pool for a drink. He promptly spit it out of course, but seriously... its called BADwater because the guy's mule wouldn't drink it after walking across the desert, why would you try?!

The basin really is sublime, despite the tourists. Nothing here is on any sort of human scale. The mountains overlooking the basin are well over 10,000 feet and simply tower so far above that everything feels flattened in an attempt to make sense of the gargantuan scale. I didn't bother taking my DSLR out because I knew it would simply fail to capture the scale and grandeur around me because my senses had failed me too.

Up and back out of the basin, I gassed up at Furnace Creek ($6.39/gal for premium if I remember, thankfully only needed a gallon), chatted with a group of ADVRiders who were waiting around the pumps for another friend to show up. They were all out on big bikes (KTM ADV's, BMW GS's, etc) and enjoying the faster, longer desert roads and two track that were more or less verboten to me now thanks to tires and gas range. Didn't stop me from pushing it later in the day however...

Climbing out of the valley, remember about 50 miles prior to this I was at -280 feet elevation.




I got lunch and gassed up again at Panamint Springs (under $6/gal, but again only needed another gallon. If you're only carrying 3.75 total with reserve bottles, no reason to pass up gas out here) and continued out of the basin. Overlooking the valley... Goodbye Death Valley!













Ok, time for one more adventure. Shouldn't bee too bad, the road is reported to be kept purposely awful to keep the meek and timid from wandering out here. Saline Valley Road. "Officially" it's closed by the Park Service to prevent the foolish from venturing out, but it is open. And there's a hot springs in the middle. I could use a good soak...

Well the joke's on me. Saline Valley 'Road' just simply beat me up. The sections that weren't horribly washboarded, and by washboarded I mean damn near mini whoops 3-4" deep spaced about a foot apart causing a teeth chattering ride at just about any speeds I could manage safely on street tires, were either full of deep sand or big rocks. By the time I reached the turn off for the springs I was exhausted and worse the sun was setting fast. I did not have provisions to stay the night as I hadn't planned on getting caught out overnight (dumbass) so instead I kept going. The wind picked up near the dunes causing the road to disappear under the silt and visibility dropped to something resembling pea soup fog. The sand washes and washboarding and rocks wore me out, wore out my rear shock for sure too. Don't be an idiot like me and attempt this road on street tires on 17" wheels. You want knobbies, you want a 21" front, and you need a bike that can get up and run on top of the washboarding to smooth it out with suspension that can handle it if you want to spend any real time out here.

However, the single coolest moment of my trip happened out here. As I was descending into the valley, I got buzzed by a F16. He was close enough to the ground that I could make out the pilot and the markings. The roar from the jet nearly made me crash as its sound triggered something in the death center of my brain that locked me up, until I realized what happened. Fuck yeah America!

Climbing out of the valley:











Once I crossed into the bristlecone forest in the Inyo National forest, the road suddenly when from shit to smooth graded dirt awesomesauce.

Up around 7000 feet:


I popped out of the desert into a pine forest and the High Sierra with almost no warning. I ate dinner in the little town of Big Pine and grabbed a hotel in Bishop while my brain tried to wrap itself around the massive and total change in scenery.

Tomorrow, I make for the coast.
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:41 AM   #190
AZ TOM
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Love it, keep it coming
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Old 04-20-2012, 12:59 AM   #191
skierd OP
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Saturday March 24

Up and out of Bishop earlyish in the morning, just long enough to get breakfast on the cheap at the Denny's across from the hotel, then heading up US 395 looking for a way over the Sierras without backtracking south several hundred miles. It was cool, low 50's, when I left and the temperature steadily dropped as I climbed up in elevation.







What a wonderful highway! Except for the short-ish four lane parts, it wound its way up from Bishop all the way to Carson City hugging the mountains and running up the valleys in long, winding curves. The first open pass as I went north was near Tahoe. I took the fun road (207) over the mountain into South Tahoe then hopped on my old friend, US 50. It was cool enough out that I didn't want to stop and dig out my phone or camera unfortunately, as it was stunningly beautiful. US 50, as I'm sure the Cali people know, cascades out of the mountains down to Sacramento before merging into I-80. It continued the mornings style of ride, easily and lazily twisting down out of the mountains. Outside of Placerville the storm clouds were gathering and the weather looked like it was going to turn wet. I stopped for gas and lunch, and called Charles (HardWorkingDog) to make sure I still had a place to stay for the night. Fortunately I did and hence I made my way to the city by the Bay.

On my way through Sacremento, I passed a road sign that was unfortunately on the other side of the highway that read off the distances to various towns along US 50. The last... Ocean City MD 3073.



Since I was a kid, every time I went to the beach, I was greeted by its counterpart that read "Sacramento CA 3073".


Cool story on the signs btw...

http://www.route50.com/sign_battle_saga.htm

Starting down on I-80, then 680, and finally to Charles' house for the night. I had made it, I finally rode to Pacific! I didn't care that it was raining, I didn't care that the traffic was kinda bad and the roads worse, I finally made it! To add the hospitality of a dry garage, good food, and a comfy bed was great, especially since Charles helped me swap my front sprocket to a 14T to get back some cruising speed now that I was out of the mountains and likely to be close to sea level for the rest of my ride and some other maintenance, laundry, etc. His wife's 3-berry jam ruined me too, every other jelly or jam I've had tasted since like garbage.

Sunday March 25 - four days to catch the ferry!

The next day I rode across the Bay Bridge, down the Embarcadero, and stopped in Golden Gate park for a photo a long time coming...









Time to ride up the coast...
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:50 AM   #192
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Old 04-20-2012, 10:08 AM   #193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skierd View Post
Saturday March 24

...To add the hospitality of a dry garage, good food, and a comfy bed was great, ...His wife's 3-berry jam ruined me too, every other jelly or jam I've had tasted since like garbage...
But now, for the REST of the story.

Dave managed to drink every LAST beer in the house--we're talking Mendocino Brewing Eye of the Hawk Ale. That guy can drink!









The REST rest of the story: I only had 2 beers in the house when he showed up...not near enough advance notice to overnight a case of Yuengling.

And I drank one of them.
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Old 04-20-2012, 01:19 PM   #194
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...head up across the bridge thru Sonoma /Mendocino kid.
Take HWY 1 all the way north.
If all ya gots is time, it's a must do.
Plenty and plenty of turns with views...
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Old 04-27-2012, 01:30 PM   #195
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Sunday March 25, continued

Left the park and headed up and across the Golden Gate Bridge. About halfway across, looking out over the Pacific and back over the city of San Francisco, my mind flooded with the memories of the previous three weeks and last two big rides, and here finally at my goal I was overwhelmed by the moment and started crying. I had to pull off on the first exit across the bridge to collect myself before continuing up to CA 1 for my ride up the coast. The afternoon stayed clear, cool and sunny as I motored north and watched the sun slowly fall into the Pacific for the first time.

And the road... jesus what a road! I've never seen anything snake in and around and back in and out on itself so many times. Thank God for the law that makes slow cars use the turn outs to let faster traffic through, and the fact that people actually do it. I really really really wished I wasn't on a loaded up bike with a nearly worn out suspension.

There is a totally and completely different feel to the Pacific coast vs the Atlantic Coast. There weren't tourist traps everywhere, it felt more lived in instead of lived on, like riding through someone's back yard instead of past miles and miles of storefronts and trinket shops. It also meant there weren't a ton of places to stop for food or gas. I stopped at the bridge over the Russian River at the Indian place there for dinner...



With the sun fast setting and a belly full of Vindaloo, I kept riding beyond what was probably reasonable or sane. It was dark, no street lights or moon light to light the road, rock slides, cows in the road, random traffic, and it started to get cold and foggy. I tried camping in several of the parks on the way up, but I refuse to pay $25-30 to set up a tent for the night. By the time I hit Westport I was completely spent, mentally and physically, and resigned myself to stopping wherever the next camp ground was, money be damned. Fortunately a few miles later there was a KOA. No one at the gate since it was well after hours, so I slipped in and set up shop for the night.

And I froze. Even in a 0 degree bag in a tent, the soggy cold ocean air robbed me of warmth at every chance to the point that I barely slept all night. It was easily one of the coldest nights I've ever spent outdoors, at a mere 40 degrees and drizzling.

Monday March 26

After a night of little sleep, I was surprisingly refreshed when I woke up but still uncomfortably cold. The skies were grey and sullen, but at least I managed to get up, packed, and out before the campground opened. Score one for my budget, and considering I didn't use any of their facilities except for the patch of ground I slept on I didn't feel bad about rolling out.

Pretty soon the road turned inland and rejoined the 101 for most of the day. At the junction, I saw a sign for the "Drive-Thru Tree Park" and of course I had to stop. And of course they were still closed, but I found my way in and around...



It more or less rained all day, so I was confined to my rainsuit and didn't stop to take pictures at all. It was just too much of a hassle to stop, dig out the camera or phone out of their respective waterproof sacks, snap a photo, bag them up, readjust the rain suit, and get moving again. I didn't stay on the 101 the entire time, taking the Ave of the Giants for example and the other scenic byways that paralleled it.

I was constantly amazed at how run down many of the northern California towns seemed to be. It reminded me of West Virginia with bigger trees, taller mountains, less industry, less pretty, and more blatant weed consumption. Maybe it was just the weather and fatigue wearing on me though. I stopped for breakfast outside of Eureka and ran in to a guy at the McDonalds who had just gotten back from spending 3 years living off of his R1. 90,000 miles on one and 60,000 miles on a second R1! We talked about my ride, his ride, how he packed (backpack with a change of clothes basically, nothing else), how he managed to stay comfortable (including several 1000+ mile days, to quote "It ain't hard to run 1000 miles when you spend three or four hours at 140mph ), why there aren't any more cheap hotels, how much food and gas have gone up in the last couple years, etc. It felt good to meet another long distance rider, someone you could tell just simply understood the 'why' without needing to explain.

Eventually... Hello Oregon!






It stopped raining for a few hours and instead was just damp and cold, but eventually of course the rain returned. By the time I reached Port Orford the wind was howling in off the ocean from the south-southwest thankfully, giving me a push mostly up the coast and the rain was coming sporadically in sheets. I did try to make one stop, at Cape Blanco, which Oregon claims is the westernmost point in the lower 48 (wikipedia disagrees).



This was the dumbest and most dangerous picture I've ever attempted to get. See the little parking pad and turn around at the end of the road? I wanted ride down to that and get my picture there but the winds were blowing so hard it knocked me over while riding. I had to fight with all of my strength to get the bike back upright, turned around, and back to the road where there were some trees to break up the wind. I damn near got blown into the pacific, bike and all.

Eventually made it as far as Florence, no sign of the Machines but a nice, reasonably priced clean local motel with a good chinese place across the street and a hot tub and sauna for my aching bones.
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