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Old 05-16-2012, 07:29 PM   #151
dogger54
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Day 16

This was a pretty laid back day. Sasho and I did a bit of riding around Fairbanks and then mostly hung out around the UAF campus. The day was really cooking, 92F, so we didn’t venture far from the air conditioning.

We killed some time at the Museum as Sasho has already mentioned…it’s a good thing he was taking pictures because I gave up after getting only glass reflections.

Here’s a poorly stitched panorama of the Fairbanks area from the UAF campus up on the hill.



Later in the day I oiled my chain for something to do…at this point I felt like a caged cat as I anticipated tomorrow’s ride.

That evening I ran into Alan Leduc and his friend Tim as they checked into the dorm. Alan is the founder of another riding forum on the net. He and Tim had started their tour 12 days earlier in Key West and were 9,000 miles into a 23,000 mile tour hitting the bays around the US and Canada. I think they said they had 41 days to make the trip. They planned on taking off for Deadhorse around 6am the next day and staying over night before heading for Inuvik the following day. Tim said either he's ridden to Deadhorse three times before or this was his third ride to Deadhorse, I forget. Whatever, the thought of all those miles in that short time makes me cringe.

Tomorrow.....
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Old 05-17-2012, 10:21 AM   #152
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Woooooow. This is somethig gooood, so good pictures, climate. This is what I like - smilig faces, sometime snow on the hills, green trees, even mosquitos is not too bad. There is place for peope but for really people only.
I hope to see Alaska jet. At this time we have our place similar at this part of world - Russia, - friendly people, ...... freedom from comertial.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvp7h...ature=youtu.be
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=783538

Thank you guys. Most of the RR from USA is boring ang commercial but you show me something new.
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Old 05-17-2012, 08:15 PM   #153
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Originally Posted by laszek13 View Post
Woooooow. This is somethig gooood, so good pictures, climate. This is what I like - smilig faces, sometime snow on the hills, green trees, even mosquitos is not too bad. There is place for peope but for really people only.
I hope to see Alaska jet. At this time we have our place similar at this part of world - Russia, - friendly people, ...... freedom from comertial.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvp7h...ature=youtu.be
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=783538

Thank you guys. Most of the RR from USA is boring ang commercial but you show me something new.
Dziękujęm bardzo Pane Laszek We're glad you like the ride report.
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Old 05-17-2012, 09:16 PM   #154
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Day 17--May 30

1) Morning
We got up awfully early and started to get ready quietly. Neither of us talked much, maybe in anticipation of today's challenge. I don't have a photo of our dorm room that morning, but it was absolute chaos with our stuff being around everywhere until we got ready. Cyle took pictures once we loaded up everything and were all ready to go:





2) Dalton Highway

There were around 100 miles from Fairbanks to the beginning of the Dalton Highway. Once we got on the Dalton, it wasn't without feelings of joy. I find it incomprehensible that we don't have pictures from the beginning of it, but anyway, here we are already along the Dalton:



We found ourselves crossing the mighty Yukon River once again, this time over a bridge:





Following the bridge is a gas station at mile 55, along with a restaurant, a souvenir shop, etc. The advice given to us most often was probably to gas up at any opportunity, allowing for alternatives such as turning around if we had to, or if the next gas station did not have fuel for some reason... We followed the advice and fuelled up, despite the $5/gallon price.

3) Hotspot cafe

Not far following the gas station (after 6 miles) we stopped the highly recommended Hotspot Cafe. I have to admit, it was interesting--a souvenir shop, hot sandwiches and hamburgers made to order. The garden was also quite impressive. I liked it--this place had a quite atmosphere.

Cyle going for the big hamburger:



I didn't fall far behind, and ordered mine with cheese, except no onions--I can't stand raw onions... now if they were grilled would be a different story:



Well, with a meal of this caliber it's only fair to get a beer, right?
To my disappointment there was no beer for sale. Well, I still had some extra in my saddlebag, and pulled one trying to remain unnoticed. Sally, who was running the cafe walked by us, saw the bottle and gave me a murderous look, but said absolutely nothing. I was determined to have a beer with such a delicious looking meal, even if that meal was my last...

Apparently the hamburger wasn't big enough as I was over and over again. Half of it was gone just as I looked at it. The other half was gone after I took a deep breath. I must've been awfully hungry. Cyle looked at me incredulously, and spent the next half hour eating his. While I drank beer.

Cyle bought a sticker after we finished eating. I wanted to buy a shot glass or a mug saying "I survived the Dalton", but did not want to tempt faith.

After we paid, a truck driver who was sitting alone on a table, with thin face, baseball cap, and gray eyes casting a cold look, stopped me with a question: "Are you the guys on motorcycles?"

I answered "Yes".

He said: "After the No Name creek (which actually really doesn't have a name) there are trucks and equipment laying the wet calcium chloride. Be careful going over it and good luck." The Calcium chloride is notorious for creating hazardous conditions for bikes going on the Dalton. It sure keeps the dust down, but when it's wet, it's slippery and gets on everything--boots, clothes, bike...

I thanked the truck driver and walked towards the bikes, thinking about his advice...
(to be continued)
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Old 05-18-2012, 05:14 AM   #155
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Old 05-19-2012, 06:29 PM   #156
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I wish you guys would speed up the process of your Riding Report! So much to anticipate of your trip and I am really enjoying it so much! Can't wait to see the Deadhorse result and ferry trip report.
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:21 AM   #157
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Day 17 - The Dalton

WOOHOO!!!….The day I’ve been looking forward to this whole trip is here!!!

Note the two gallons of gas strapped to my top box…after all the issues I’ve had with fuel economy and with Deadhorse being 250 miles from Coldfoot, I’m not taking any chances.



We headed out of Fairbanks at around 9am with temperatures in the 60s. There was a lot of smoke in the air around Fairbanks so maybe this is why we didn't get any pictures before hitting the Dalton.


We didn't get a shot of us at the sign at the beginning of the Dalton because I was in the lead and when I saw the sign it was much smaller than what I had seen in other RRs and there were no stickers...I thought this couldn't be the sign and kept going.

Some shots of the Dalton...some of the paved sections had something like frost heaves that wanted to launch me as I went over...landing was rather painful to my neck and back.
















Our first fuel stop was at the Yukon river, I was getting 50mpg so now I could relax and enjoy the ride.

Here’s a shot of the Hot Spot just beyond the Yukon river.



Another shot of my burger and my souvenir purchase.



Be careful when filing a complaint.




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Old 05-20-2012, 10:42 AM   #158
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Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
I wish you guys would speed up the process of your Riding Report! So much to anticipate of your trip and I am really enjoying it so much! Can't wait to see the Deadhorse result and ferry trip report.
Patience WhicheverAnyWayCan, thanks for coming along and hanging in there...winter has retreated and we're finding it difficult to keep focused.

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Old 05-21-2012, 08:12 PM   #159
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Day 17--May 30 (continued)

Somewhere along the next stretch I witnessed what I consider a very unfortunate incident... A bunny rabbit was hiding in the bushes along the Dalton in attack mode. He decided to lunge at Cyle, who did all to avoid him with the front wheel. However, the bunny rabbit was not so easily discouraged and decided to flip Cyle over by becoming an obstacle on the road. All I saw is the rear wheel of Cyle's KLR go up ever so slightly. The next thing I had to witness is the bunny rabbit pulling himself across the road with front legs only, dragging the rest of his body across the road. That killed the buzz of riding the Dalton for me a bit.

Next we went through the Roller Coaster section of the Dalton. As Cyle was riding in front of me, all of he sudden he disappeared, as if the road swallowed him. I got to the same spot and looked on front of me--the decline seemed steep and almost vertical to me at that time. I went down as fast as I could, enjoying the "Weeeeee!!!!" moment. This is not my picture but it can give an idea of this section:

http://joecruz.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/img_1363.JPG

Soon we got to "No name" creek that the truck driver warned me about. It was awfully slippery for sure, the tires slipped around looking for traction, but I went through. Other than the wet mud that got on me and the bike, there was no other consequence.

We got to Finger Mountain as well (mile No 98), where we stopped to stretch and take some pictures:



There is a description on Wikipedia too:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finger_Mountain

We got to the Arctic Circle, sort of, around 50-60 miles from the Hotspot Cafe going North. I say sort of, because we only saw the sign for the turnout and didn't stop. More exactly, I saw the sign for the Arctic Circle turnout. Cyle apparently didn't see it and kept going. Well, at least I knew that now we are officially up North.

4) Coldfoot camp

After we passed other notable places along the Dalton, such as the "Oh Shit Corner", "Prospect Creek", which holds the record for lowest temperature measured in the USA, Douglas Creek, and Koyukuk, we finally got to Coldfoot where we fueled up for the last time before Deadhorse. Coldfoot is at mile 175 on the Dalton, and some information is available again on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coldfoot,_Alaska

Population--13

By this time we have gone through a few sections where workers were spraying the road and laying the Calcium chloride. Luckily, we managed getting through without any drama:





Coldfoot also has rooms and camp spaces for rent. The campground is near the lake, behind the trailers with rooms. I inside went to pay after I filled up. While I was paying the gas, I heard this blood chilling howls... I asked the guy behind the counter about it, and he said: "There are sled dogs behind the camp, they want to be fed." I asked him if I could go and take a look. He said with a furrowed brow: "OK, just don't do anything stupid!"

I couldn't find Cyle, so I went by myself. Soon I met the team:



The dogs saw me and wagged tails for a while, the started howling again. There is the leader in the photo above with his head straight up towards the sky. I made a video as well, let's see if I can get a link to it:







After I shot the little video, a woman came and untied her husky, who was jumping up on me being friendly, I hoped She explained that it was hers, and started asking me questions. One of her questions was: "So when are you leaving?" I answered her politely and didn't get offended, and told her about our ride to Deadhorse, and then back. We spoke some more, she wished me all the best and said goodbye.

Back at the gas station I found Cyle and told him about the dogs. To me this was a significant moment, because it gave me some ideas for later. Something that involves winter, dogs and sledding

We are surprised big time coming out of Coldfoot--brand new asphalt!!! As if was paved just a few days before we got here. I even thought that I could smell the paint in the middle:



sasho screwed with this post 05-21-2012 at 08:17 PM Reason: embed video
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:07 AM   #160
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Day 17--May 30 (continued)

5) Atigun Pass http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atigun_Pass

We had to reach Atigun Pass next. The pass offers passage through the Brooks Range Mountains. The elevation of the pass is 4,739 ft, or 1,422 m.
But before we reached the pass, we went through a few more sections with road work.


The last section with sloppy Calcium Chloride was uphill--I was trying to think about keeping the throttle and not change gears until the end. I rode through this section in second gear, with the rear wheel sliding side to side. I was wearing a pair of army desert boots, which seemed to resist water less and less...

We got to the bottom of Atigun Pass:



All vegetation disappeared while we were going over the pass and somehow the bare landscape was incredibly captivating...





6) Tundra

The view changed completely on the North side of the pass--nothing except the road as far as the eye could see, tundra, swamps, strong wind, and a clear blue sky:





The bird species were diverse and numerous. I unfortunately did not succeed in photographing any of them, since I quickly discovered that riding a bike and trying to take a picture of a flying object is impossible... I was also wearing 2 pairs of gloves because after we went over the pass, we felt the cold embrace of the Arctic ocean. The tiny camera buttons did not like the 2 pairs of gloves.



70-80 miles before Deadhorse we approached a figure moving a lot slower than us. We stopped to meet a real adventurer:



This is Pierre from Germany who is riding his bicycle from Anchorage to Deadhorse. It's taken him 8 days to get to here from Fairbanks. While we talked with Pierre, we saw caribou for the first time:





After we finished talking with Pierre (mostly we listened about his endeavors), we checked if he needed anything and continued. By this time it was really cold, despite the sun in the late evening sky (around 9:00pm).

7) Deadhorse

We finally got to Deadhorse!! We stopped at the Prudhoe Bay Inn to look for rooms. I think Cyle had called ahead while we were in Fairbanks:



I was frozen stiff. My right hand refused to open, and I pried my fingers off the handlebar with my left hand. Upon arrival we saw a shiny BMW, as if it was off the showroom, while our bikes were looking pathetic. We wondered for a while how did this bike get here, maybe on a truck or a plane...

This is where also the Arctic Ocean tours were starting then. Only on a bus, it was $40 I think, and the reservation had to be made at least a day in advance for a background check. Cyle had taken care of all that while we were in Fairbanks.

To my surprise there was phone signal too. I guess I'll have to get up in the morning for that 5 am interview. Who would have thought, right near the Arctic Ocean?

Stats from Cyle for this day, I looked for the first time at this photo and just now noticed the latitude recorded by the GPS:

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Old 05-24-2012, 08:33 PM   #161
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As we pulled into the Hot Spot, Allen and Tim were just leaving…this wasn't the last we would see of these two.

Wow! Was I a space case after we left the Hot Spot…I couldn’t believe I missed the turn to the Arctic Circle sign. We stopped for a break somewhere after the Hot Spot and Sasho says with a lot of concern in his voice, "Aren’t we going to stop at the Arctic Circle?" to which I responded "Of course." He than informs me that we passed the Arctic Circle miles back…I could hardly believe it. Well, I guess I’ll have to be extra vigilant on the way back.

Some shots of the surroundings as we made our way to Coldfoot…the scenery is spectacular in it’s own way.



The Black Spruce is looking pretty scraggly this far north.



Some info. about Finger Mountain.











We arrived at Coldfoot and stopped for gas and a chance to stretch our legs, the day had really warmed up…I believe it was in the 80s in Coldfoot.



The restaurant



and post office





You can rent a room here.



or for $14 a night you can pitch your tent on the grass next to a pond…shower included.

Shortly we were on the road again. I began to dread seeing tanker trucks on the road or along the road, their presence meant that the road was being watered and we were in for some slick riding.





but the dry areas were hard and smooth.



Approaching Atigun Pass.



Looking back from the top.



They were watering the bottom portion of the pass making for some interesting riding up the slippery slope.

The other side of the pass.





It’s amazing how much the temperature changed just going over the pass, a bit more snow on this side.









As we left the Brooks range behind the tundra opened up and the road got rough.









Then we saw this speck in the road and as we got closer we could make out that it was a bicycler.





Pierre was heading for Happy Valley to spend the night before making the final push to Deadhorse…I think Happy Valley is somewhere around 75 miles from Deadhorse…I didn’t envy his job, considering the condition of the roads.

After trading greetings and scoping out the Caribou we were on our way again.











This was a welcome sight.



We finally arrived at Deadhorse around 11pm…my fingers had been freezing for the past 100 miles.



We crashed at the Caribou Inn for the night.



We arrived too late for supper which ended at 8pm…I don’t remember what we did for food. I don’t remember much about that night other than flopping on the bed and falling asleep. I woke up at 12:30 am and decided to go outside to see where the sun was.

Here’s the sun at 12:30am on May 31.



While I was taking pictures I was joined by another crazy fool who also wanted a picture of the midnight sun…he was a member of a tour group that had arrived on a large tour bus.

After getting my picture of the midnight sun I stumbled back inside to a warm bed, happy in the thought that I wasn’t going to have to get up at 5:00 am and stand out in the parking lot freezing my arse off while talking to someone on a cell phone.
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Old 05-25-2012, 11:36 AM   #162
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Originally Posted by dogger54 View Post

We finally arrived at Deadhorse around 11pm…my fingers had been freezing for the past 100 miles.

Do you have heating grip or electric glove? If no, what glove did you had?? Would you recommend heating grip?? Curious!! I am hoping to be in Deadhorse this time of the year next year so appreciate any helpful tip!
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:43 PM   #163
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Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Do you have heating grip or electric glove? If no, what glove did you had?? Would you recommend heating grip?? Curious!! I am hoping to be in Deadhorse this time of the year next year so appreciate any helpful tip!
WhicheverAnyWayCan - I didn't have any heated gear. I had leather gloves and some waterproof gloves and some liners...in retrospect, totally inadequate gear for the conditions we encountered around Deadhorse. Wind chill on the hands was the big problem so I think something like "Hippo Hands" would have taken care of my cold hands problem.

I've since installed heated grips but I've found these really only heat the inside of my hands and fingers so parts of my fingers still get cold. I still need to explore the "Hippo Hands" option.
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Old 05-25-2012, 06:42 PM   #164
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Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Do you have heating grip or electric glove? If no, what glove did you had?? Would you recommend heating grip?? Curious!! I am hoping to be in Deadhorse this time of the year next year so appreciate any helpful tip!
Neither of us had electric grips or heated gloves on the trip. I just had a pair of leather LL Bean gloves that I got as a gift. Up North I used an old pair of ski gloves with padding, to which I added glove liners I bought at Walmart in Fairbanks. The ski gloves kept the moisture inside pretty well which made my hands ice cold, and soaked quick from the outside to boot...

If you go for any heated gear, definitely go for gloves first. It was my hands that were cold the most during this trip. Everything else can be worked with--extra layer on your body, another pair of socks, or a towel around your neck... The hands will get cold first, and without a good pair of gloves not much can be done except suck it up or stop frequently and stick them by the cylinder or the muffler.
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Old 05-25-2012, 07:01 PM   #165
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Day 18--May 31

1) Phone interview

This morning was like no other. I had set my alarm for 4am the night before. I wanted to have some time for coffee and a chance to wake up and gather my thoughts in anticipation of the interview. Of course, I was the only soul awake at that hour in the Arctic Caribou Inn restaurant. All I could hear was the rumble from the vending machines, which at this hour sounded deafening. Looking around, I found out that one can pick something from the fridge, and pay for it later. Honour system.

I waited until a bit before 5, but there was no phone signal inside. Out to the parking lot I go, where the 22F temperature had me shivering in no time. I verified that I got signal on my phone and continued to freeze my ass off. The phone rang exactly at 5 am!!

One of the people in the call was in Vladivostok, the other in Washington DC. The conversation switched to Russian, since that was the main reason they wanted to talk to me. Short story long, the lady in Vladivostok said that they want someone not only to speak the language, but to discuss the technical aspects of the project in Russian. Well, at 5 in the morning I had nothing--I kept repeating myself that I understand the language, and can also read and write, but couldn't say anything else. I was met with silence from the other side... After a while of that we wrapped up and said good bye. Total failure--at 5am in the freezing parking lot of the Caribou Inn in Deadhorse that was all I had...

I went back to the room quite disappointed with myself. Apparently this ordeal woke up Cyle too--he asked how it all went. I summarized how I screwed it all up. He said: "I'm sure you tried your best, and whatever happens just don't worry about it". I tried to put the early morning ordeal out of my mind.

2) Arctic Ocean

Neither of us went back to sleep, and we just waited until it was time for the tour to the Arctic Ocean. First we watched a video: how BP takes protection of the environment very seriously, etc... It was interesting to find out how workers live here--they work 2 weeks, then have 2 weeks off. So they work for a half year in harsh conditions.

Who would've thought that we will see a National Forest in Prudhoe Bay:



I find the crowleys quite interesting. The rubber balloons that work as tires have 3-5 PSI in them, so they wouldn't disturb vegetation even when caring heavy loads. We were told that a driver was overrun by one of them. After the vehicle went over him, he got up and chased it down.

Side note--apparently Crowley has sold that part of the business:
http://www.crowley.com/News-and-Medi...Assets-to-Peak



Arctic Ocean--are we there yet??



The local Christmas tree:



Getting close:



We finally get to the Arctic Ocean. I am freezing here:



The water was frozen and I didn't take a dip, I am not sure I would want to anyway:



I tried to be triumphant and enthusiastic, but it didn't turn out. Can we get back to the warm bus now?



On the way back to the Caribou Inn we talked with Jack and his wife, Donna. Turns out the BMW outside of the hotel was theirs:



We asked Jack how he got it up here. He seemed to get offended for a brief moment, saying: "I rode it, that's how..." We told him that we were surprised just how clean his bike looked. He loosened up and patiently explained that the bike has a good fairing. Both Jack and Donna were very nice and we very much enjoyed hearing their story--they have traveled here from Key West, on an IBA ride. We signed their IBA papers as witnesses when we got back to the hotel.

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