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Old 03-21-2012, 10:11 PM   #211
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I remember that canyon with the pavement which ends in a drop off. We did that in about 1977 or 78 in a Chevy Nova. Had to pile up rocks to get by it. We were young and nuts. Here is Betsy by Luna's Jacal on that trip.



Here is the Castolon store then.


And this interesting place near Terlingua where some locals apparently lived. That is me sitting in the doorway.


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Old 03-22-2012, 09:44 AM   #212
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Hey Cannonshot.......you didn't happen to pick up my license plat,inspection sticker and mounting bracket on Black Gap did ya? Or maybe it was Glenn Springs or River Road East? Man...........I've landed on my head so many times I can't remember where I lost it, I know it was somewhere down that way?
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:05 AM   #213
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I sent the link to this thread to a friend of mine who lived in the area for many years ago. He mentioned when he was 11, which was about 70 years ago.
Bob, This thread was written for you.
Here is his response.
Don

Yup, going to have to take some time to read. My part of the world. In addition to playing high school football in a couple of those small towns (Marfa, Van Horn and Alpine,) hunting some of that area, and in my insurance life traveling to handle Voluntary Workers' Compensation claims in many of those ranches, I'm also very interested, and very informed on Victorio. I've already seen a couple of discrepancies in accounts. Victorio was killed at Tres Castillos by Col. Joaquin Terrazas, a great uncle and renowned Indian fighter in the state of Chihuahua. The band numbered 179 including women and children. Victorio, as most Apaches, spent most of his life n Mexico with forays to Warm Springs, in New Mexico, then returning to Mexico via the Mescalero reservation, south through the Sacramento mountains, the Delawares, and crossing the river very near Ft. Quitman. That whole band was annihilated. A few women who survived, were taken to Chihuahua city and kept as slaves, but eventually escaped over years. A small band led by Nana was on an ammunition resupply raid in Mexico when all this occurred. Nana was an old man but organized a band from Juh's band in the Sierra Madres to the west, and the 4 or 5 companions, and did a raid into New Mexico as far north as Albuquerque, killing and pillaging along the way, as revenge for the killing of Victorio's band. They didn't really understand borders but he returned to Mexico and later popped up with Geronimo. Note all the names were Spanish. I've run all over that country in one form or another, usually horses or a hot rod I used to have, and I've hunted deer on horses in Mexico very near Tres Castillos. Used to go down to a natural spring at Comanche Springs, a huge outdoor swimming pool, near Ft. Stockton to show off for the pretty girls down there. I was a 3 meter diver in those days when a 1 somersault with a full twist used to get ooohs and ahs and an intro to the somewhat "cooperative" girls that hung out there. I can tell some stories!!! The movie "Giant" was filmed in the range land just west of Ft. Davis. The house they built for the movie may still be there.

I have a good book on Victoria written by a nearby neighbor and professor at UTEP, Eve Ball, and another on Nana's raid by a guy named Lekson, a couple of about 2 dozen I have on the Apaches. Naturally I have all the Geronimo books that have ever been written.

You're right. Thanks!!!

Email #2
Wow! What a great description of 'my' country!! Really enjoyed that and learned a lot in process. Two of the several ranches I visited in my insurance investigation days are mentioned. Particularly I remember the Brite Ranch just north of Valentine the first time I went. I had been running up and down some long, rutted ranch roads in my travels and headed there late afternoon. In the earlier phone call I was given directions for the entry to the ranch road which was not well marked, and told to drive about 20 miles down that dirt road which ended at the ranch house. I found the road, turned on it and started in. There were a number of branches and cross roads to the two track jeep trail I was on but no sign of the ranch house. I drove the 20 miles per the odometer and hit the mountains and no ranch house. I stopped, got out to scout at the base of a very small hill to my right and was looking to try to spot buildings and a windmill. Nothing. Heard a rumble almost like a quake starting and about that time a LARGE herd, maybe 50, of antelope topped that rise on the run heading right for me and the car. They passed me on both sides and stopped about 50 yards away as if to see what the almost ran over. I had been a bit concerned but drove about a 400 yards past the rise where I had stopped and there was the ranch house with the folks waiting for me. The other ranch I do remember was the Means Ranch but it wasn't mentioned. Valentine was the site of the best steak I ever ate. I was on a school bus returning from the state basketball tournament in San Antonio where we won state championship. Coach stopped there and splurged. That steak covered entirely one of those oval steak platters!

I recognized nothing in Big Bend where I had only been once at about age 11. Marfa looked exactly the same and even the hotel where we stayed looked the same. Sul Ross college is where "Hoss" Cartright, that big dude in one of the western series on TV, played football. He was from Alpine.

Thanks, most enjoyable. The country looks exactly the same as the mountains just east of El Paso, the Hueco's and the Delaware's, where I tramped around quite a bit though it was all private property.

Bob
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:23 AM   #214
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Wow, awesome ride report!

I was with the TWTex group that weekend and the weather was absoultely off the hook. However, looking at all your photos and reading al the history, I almost feel like we went to different places. I was so focused on the riding that I wasn't paying attention to the location. Next time I will spend more time taking the scenery....
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:38 AM   #215
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Part of soaking in a place as complex as Big Bend is slowing down and checking the side trails. Research before and/or after the ride fills in a lot of details. My gal is great about searching out details pre-ride. We have been known to spend a full day riding a total of 14 miles and get back to camp with several hundred pictures to sort and great memories of the day.

I am thoroughly enjoying the report. Wish I had known you were down in my neck of the woods.
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:14 AM   #216
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Hoss Cartwright from Bonanza

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salsa View Post
I sent the link to this thread to a friend of mine who lived in the area for many years ago. He mentioned when he was 11, which was about 70 years ago.
Bob, This thread was written for you.
Here is his response.
Don



I recognized nothing in Big Bend where I had only been once at about age 11. Marfa looked exactly the same and even the hotel where we stayed looked the same. Sul Ross college is where "Hoss" Cartright, that big dude in one of the western series on TV, played football. He was from Alpine.

Thanks, most enjoyable. The country looks exactly the same as the mountains just east of El Paso, the Hueco's and the Delaware's, where I tramped around quite a bit though it was all private property.

Bob
Hoss from the western 'Bonanza' wasn't from Alpine. He's Dan Blocker from O'Donnell, Texas. He died from cancer at an early age and there's a Dan Blocker memorial in O'Donnell.
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Old 03-23-2012, 02:18 PM   #217
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Funny you mention......

Funny you mention Hoss (Dan Blocker) Cartright, he was born in DeKalb, Tx. His family moved to O'Donnell just after he was born. He and I were born on the same date, Dec 10th. and he is from the same part of N. Texas that I am from too. He is buried north of DeKalb Texas, in a small cemetery out in the country. I rode thru there and showed my passenger it about a week ago coming back from Mena, Ar. I was telling my pretty sidecar passenger about him. Wikipedia his name and you find some interesting facts about him, hard to believe he passed away in 1972. I am getting to be an old fart.
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Old 03-26-2012, 11:42 AM   #218
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Heading North Toward Persimmon Gap

Sorry for the delay in continuing the ride report. Had to take a few days off to do some dirt riding.

Heading north toward Persimmon Gap.




A nice cool morning in Chisos Basin.








There are some exhibits inside the Panther Junction visitor center. One of which is this terrain map of the park.




While heading toward Persimmon Gap, there is an interesting old grave.


Mrs. Hannold asked to be buried here. She died in 1911.


While she tended the ranch and children, her husband supplemented his income by teaching school over at Dugout Wells (a place we visited earlier).


The original headstone is still in place.






There is a fossil dig in the park.




About 50 million years ago this area was tropical. Animals like this inhabited the place.


Not so many years ago there was some lush grass on these flats. When the ranch land was going to be converted to a National Park, ranchers were given a couple of years or so to complete their ranching operations. Since the ranchers were never going to use the land again, they overgrazed it destroying the grass. The few inches of topsoil washed away and the grass is hopelessly lost.




You'll see some brush piled near this road. This is an effort to restore some grass. The piled brush provides shades, protection, and soil stability.




This bridge washed out before. The new one seems solid.


These creeks can go from zero to flood in no time at all - then return to a dry wash within a day or so.






A road to the west. I'm only taking it for a short run to look at something.


This road will have some challenges when wet.


Bone Spring is down there. For a while freighters paid a nickel a head to water their mules back in the 1890s. In 1936, a guy showed up here with a treasure map. He was 88 years old and had a map that led from Boquillas to Bone Spring. For days he dug around the site looking for silver bullion that was buried there. The story came out that this guy was a very young member of Quantrill's Raiders and that Quantrill drew the map for him. Quantrill and the boys had picked off a mine south of Boquillas and managed to make it to Bone Spring in tough shape. Barely able to continue, they buried their loot there planning to go back for it later.


Devil's Den is nearby. It is said that because it is deep and dark only devils would live there.
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Old 03-26-2012, 11:49 AM   #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geolpilot View Post
I remember that canyon with the pavement which ends in a drop off. We did that in about 1977 or 78 in a Chevy Nova. Had to pile up rocks to get by it. We were young and nuts. Here is Betsy by Luna's Jacal on that trip.

Here is the Castolon store then.

And this interesting place near Terlingua where some locals apparently lived. That is me sitting in the doorway.
I can't imagine taking that road in a car. Must hve been fun!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Outlaw6Guy View Post
Hey Cannonshot.......you didn't happen to pick up my license plat,inspection sticker and mounting bracket on Black Gap did ya? Or maybe it was Glenn Springs or River Road East? Man...........I've landed on my head so many times I can't remember where I lost it, I know it was somewhere down that way?
No I didn't see it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salsa View Post
I sent the link to this thread to a friend of mine who lived in the area for many years ago. He mentioned when he was 11, which was about 70 years ago.
Bob, This thread was written for you.
Here is his response.
Don

Yup, going to have to take some time to read. My part of the world. In addition to playing high school football in a couple of those small towns (Marfa, Van Horn and Alpine,) hunting some of that area, and in my insurance life traveling to handle Voluntary Workers' Compensation claims in many of those ranches, I'm also very interested, and very informed on Victorio. I've already seen a couple of discrepancies in accounts. Victorio was killed at Tres Castillos by Col. Joaquin Terrazas, a great uncle and renowned Indian fighter in the state of Chihuahua. The band numbered 179 including women and children. Victorio, as most Apaches, spent most of his life n Mexico with forays to Warm Springs, in New Mexico, then returning to Mexico via the Mescalero reservation, south through the Sacramento mountains, the Delawares, and crossing the river very near Ft. Quitman. That whole band was annihilated. A few women who survived, were taken to Chihuahua city and kept as slaves, but eventually escaped over years. A small band led by Nana was on an ammunition resupply raid in Mexico when all this occurred. Nana was an old man but organized a band from Juh's band in the Sierra Madres to the west, and the 4 or 5 companions, and did a raid into New Mexico as far north as Albuquerque, killing and pillaging along the way, as revenge for the killing of Victorio's band. They didn't really understand borders but he returned to Mexico and later popped up with Geronimo. Note all the names were Spanish. I've run all over that country in one form or another, usually horses or a hot rod I used to have, and I've hunted deer on horses in Mexico very near Tres Castillos. Used to go down to a natural spring at Comanche Springs, a huge outdoor swimming pool, near Ft. Stockton to show off for the pretty girls down there. I was a 3 meter diver in those days when a 1 somersault with a full twist used to get ooohs and ahs and an intro to the somewhat "cooperative" girls that hung out there. I can tell some stories!!! The movie "Giant" was filmed in the range land just west of Ft. Davis. The house they built for the movie may still be there.

I have a good book on Victoria written by a nearby neighbor and professor at UTEP, Eve Ball, and another on Nana's raid by a guy named Lekson, a couple of about 2 dozen I have on the Apaches. Naturally I have all the Geronimo books that have ever been written.

You're right. Thanks!!!

Email #2
Wow! What a great description of 'my' country!! Really enjoyed that and learned a lot in process. Two of the several ranches I visited in my insurance investigation days are mentioned. Particularly I remember the Brite Ranch just north of Valentine the first time I went. I had been running up and down some long, rutted ranch roads in my travels and headed there late afternoon. In the earlier phone call I was given directions for the entry to the ranch road which was not well marked, and told to drive about 20 miles down that dirt road which ended at the ranch house. I found the road, turned on it and started in. There were a number of branches and cross roads to the two track jeep trail I was on but no sign of the ranch house. I drove the 20 miles per the odometer and hit the mountains and no ranch house. I stopped, got out to scout at the base of a very small hill to my right and was looking to try to spot buildings and a windmill. Nothing. Heard a rumble almost like a quake starting and about that time a LARGE herd, maybe 50, of antelope topped that rise on the run heading right for me and the car. They passed me on both sides and stopped about 50 yards away as if to see what the almost ran over. I had been a bit concerned but drove about a 400 yards past the rise where I had stopped and there was the ranch house with the folks waiting for me. The other ranch I do remember was the Means Ranch but it wasn't mentioned. Valentine was the site of the best steak I ever ate. I was on a school bus returning from the state basketball tournament in San Antonio where we won state championship. Coach stopped there and splurged. That steak covered entirely one of those oval steak platters!

I recognized nothing in Big Bend where I had only been once at about age 11. Marfa looked exactly the same and even the hotel where we stayed looked the same. Sul Ross college is where "Hoss" Cartright, that big dude in one of the western series on TV, played football. He was from Alpine.

Thanks, most enjoyable. The country looks exactly the same as the mountains just east of El Paso, the Hueco's and the Delaware's, where I tramped around quite a bit though it was all private property.

Bob
That is pretty neat Bob. Thanks for sharing his insight and comments!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerfuffle View Post
Wow, awesome ride report!

I was with the TWTex group that weekend and the weather was absoultely off the hook. However, looking at all your photos and reading al the history, I almost feel like we went to different places. I was so focused on the riding that I wasn't paying attention to the location. Next time I will spend more time taking the scenery....
Thanks! The weather was fantastic that day. Glad you are enjoying the history. Next time some of those stops will be a little more interesting . . . I hope anyway.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ed29 View Post
Part of soaking in a place as complex as Big Bend is slowing down and checking the side trails. Research before and/or after the ride fills in a lot of details. My gal is great about searching out details pre-ride. We have been known to spend a full day riding a total of 14 miles and get back to camp with several hundred pictures to sort and great memories of the day.

I am thoroughly enjoying the report. Wish I had known you were down in my neck of the woods.
Thanks! For me the research can sometimes be as entertaining as the ride itself. I think we agree that it makes for a richer experience overall.
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:29 PM   #220
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Through Persimmon Gap to Stillwell Store

Continuing through the Persimmon Gap to the Stillwell Store.


Dog Canyon is in the background. It was named such after some people found an abandoned wagon there that had a dog guarding it. No one associated with the wagon was ever found.


In more recent times, a drug dealer (Acosta's younger brother) was being chased in the park when he wrecked his vehicle. The border patrol lit him up just north of Panther Junction and the dealer and his girlfriend led them on a high speed chase. Once he wrecked his car, the dealer and his girlfriend took off into the desert. The cops found 50 pounds of marihuana in the vehicle. Since they knew Acosta was armed and it was getting dark, the manhunt was put off until morning. The next morning an aircraft spotted young Acosta in Dog Canyon. The cops sealed it off and moved in to arrest him. Young Acosta was a heroin addict. As the cops moved in young Acosta stuck himself with a syringe. He knew he was going down so he opted to go for one last fix.


Just prior to the Civil War, the Army experimented with using camels for transport in the desert. One lieutenant ran this expedition.


The camels went through Dog Canyon on their trek. Camel transport made the trip in 60% of the time it would have taken men and horses. Camels appeared to be a good mobility vehicle for desert warfare. Camels covered between 20 and 34 miles per day. They went 72 hours without water, carried 400 lbs of cargo, and ate creosote bushes that other stock would not eat.


The Civil War ended the experiment and the railroad ended much of the need for camels. Lieutenant Colonel Robert E. Lee of the US Army (before he changed jobs) said that "But for the camels' endurance, docility, and sagacity . . . the reconnaissance would have failed".






Persimmon Gap visitor center.


The building used to be Cooper's Store. Coop's was the center of information between the railroad and the river since people passed by here coming and going.






I think Coop moved in and set up here around 1929. He did a little wax making as well. Note dog canyon in the background of this picture of candelilla harvesters.


Persimmon Gap is also a choke point on the commanche war trail.


Every year,starting back in the 1700s, the commanches used to come through this gap as part of their annual raiding tour. They would leave their home range in September and come down through this gap to raid ranches and towns in the Big Bend and Mexico. They were stealing loot, horses, and weapons to improve their posture back home.


This is the gap. It is also a park entrance point.


This is how it looks from a distance. It is a pass through the mountains. By the way, the commanche trail left a mile wide imprint on the desert that could be seen in some places for years.


There is a smaller gap nearby that is called either Muskhog or Javelina Gap. A young fellow was riding through the gap when he rode into a herd of javelinas. A young javelina laid down to play dead and the kid scooped it up. When it squealed and carried on the rest of the herd attacked the boy so he took off with the animal. Hence the name of the gap.


Hallie Stillwell wrote a couple of books about her life in the Big Bend. Interesting reads. The Stillwell Ranch headquarters is near this store.


There is a museum at the store that covers much of her life on the ranch. Just ask at the store and they'll toss you the key.


They have gas there as well.






Museum


I think this is the pistol she carried when she taught school in Presidio around the time Pancho Villa's boys were making trouble in Ojinaga just across the river.




Interesting to see how primitive ranch life was.


Always interesting to look at how things once were.
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Old 03-27-2012, 08:52 AM   #221
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Dagger Flats

Took a ride up Dagger Flats Road.


There is an interesting array of desert plants along this road.


The Chihuahuan Desert is the second largest desert in North America. Most of it is in Mexico. Rainfall averages 10 inches or less per year most of which comes in July and August.


Lechuguilla or "shin dagger". These stout leaves can produce some nasty punctures.


Creosote bush. Camels would eat these when other animals wouldn't. Leaves in the desert are bad for a plant (water loss) so these have a protective covering to preserve water.


Ocotillo. Most of the time this thing is thorny stalks. In good times it grows small leaves and loses them when water is scarce.


Strawberry Pitaya.


Prickly Pear Cactus. Almost every state in the US has some species of prickly pear.




Texas Persimmon. This variety produces sweet fruit and the black juice is used in drying leather.


Torrey Yucca. The old leaves protect the trunk.


I mentioned candelilla wax production. It comes from this candelilla plant.


Candelilla stores water in the stems which are protected by a covering of wax. People would harvest the plant and then remove the wax by heating the material in a mixture of water and sulfuric acid. The wax is heavy and is useful for chewing gum, cosmetics, car wax, shoe polish, and other products.


Giant Dagger Yucca


Back in 1914 a guy and his two sons were herding goats on Dagger Flats. The old man went to town to get supplies. He hired a young fellow he found in Marathon to help out with the extra work at kidding time. The kid arrived in Marathon on a freight train and was pretty much a hobo.


When they got back to camp at Dagger Tank they found the kid wasn't much of a worker. Instead of work., the kid wanted to read wild west novels.


The men were making dinner when they heard the action on a Winchester rifle cycle. One herder named Bill turned to see the boy they hired shoot him. The bullet tore up two ribs and then smashed his jawbone. Another herder rushed the boy to get the gun and he was shot in the head and killed. The old man that hired the boy was shot and killed whiled trying to get up out of a chair.


Though wounded, Bill was able to flee into the darkness. He made it about five miles out to the road when he met some Mexican boys that were freighting who took him to Bone Spring. From Bone Spring Bill continued on toward another ranch. Eventually he ran into a rancher who took him to Marathon. Bill told the rancher he had traveled about 30 miles trying to get help and that he only had one drink of water. Twenty eight hours after being shot Bill arrived in Marathon.


The doctor in Marathon put Bill on a train to El Paso but said he thought Bill wasn't going to make it. He did and was still going strong about 40 years later.


The boy thought he had killed all three of the men so he cooked up a story about how they were attacked by Mexican bandits and how he survived.


Some think the kid got some ideas from reading those novels. In the end he was declared insane and put in a nut house in his home state of Illinois.


Some time later, the kid escaped from the Illinois facility and killed two more men without cause. He was eventually executed.
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Old 03-27-2012, 06:58 PM   #222
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Old Ore Road - Part I

Old Ore Road (North to South)


The Old Ore Road was used for hauling lead, zinc, and silver ore from the Boquillas area mines to the railroad in Marathon. Part of it still exists in a rugged condition. We are riding a segment that is around 27 miles long and primitive.


An early morning run is recommended for photographers.


The road is rocky.


There are some soft spots in the crossings.






Some nice views along the way.








The spring is said to be pretty reliable.














Roy's Peak campsite.








During WWI, the Army ran a telephone line through this canyon.


It connected Stillwell Crossing with La Noria.






A pouroff at Alto Relfex.


Needs a rainstorm to function.
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Old 03-28-2012, 09:05 AM   #223
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Old Ore Road Part 2

Continuing south on the Old Ore Road.


Willow Tank is a good wildlife watching spot as there is a spring there. Tanks are dugouts that ranchers put in to hold water for cattle.


The Ernst Basin campsite is at the top of a segment of the original ore road. The original road is open to hiking.








Along this stretch you cross an old road to the west that heads over to the old Joe Loftin place. The road is closed so it is a walk to the ruins. In 1933 Loftin was convicted of killing Jose de Leon, the guy whose grave is along this road.


There are some tinajas that hold water along this creek.


La Noria used to be a substantial community. Little is left now.


Max Ernst started the development in 1898. It was a farming community for over 30 years. Ernst ran a post office, store, and was justice of the peace here. In 1908 he was coming back from a visit to Mexico after checking on a mail order fraud case when he was shot in the back while riding through Ernst Gap (coincidence?). He died a day later. It is believed that the shooter was a hired to kill him. No one was convicted.




The Ernst Tinaja is off to the east a bit. You can hike to it. It is a pretty significant tinaja. I guess it is deep enough that it is difficult to get out of. Some soldiers installed a metal ring to use to get in and out when they swam there. I lion got in it once and couldn't get out as did an assortment of other animals.


Part of the trail to hike up there.




The grave of Jose de Leon (murdered by Joe Loftin) is nearby.




Candelilla plants at this campsite.


The end of the Old Ore Road where it meets the paved road to Rio Grande Village.
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:59 PM   #224
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Went back and added to the Black Gap Road segment of this report that on March 12, rangers investigated a report of a truck broken down on Black Gap Road. When they investigated, they found a truck laden with 2,179 pounds of marihuana. The smugglers abandoned the truck and hoofed it back to Mexico.

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Old 03-28-2012, 08:29 PM   #225
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Boquillas/Rio Grande Village Area Part 1

Part one of the Boquillas/Rio Grande Village area.


Just south of Old Ore Road is a tunnel that takes the place of the old Dead Man's Curve that went around the tunnel hill to the right. This is where Max Ernst was shot in the back with a .44 on his way back from investigating some mail fraud.




Lots of warnings not to buy stuff.


This was originally built as a US Customs House. For a while it was a residence. Now researchers stay there.




Some of that stuff you aren't supposed to buy.


Taped over warning sign telling people not to buy.










I watched one of these guys ride back to Mexico from the US side.




From 1915-1919 an aerial tramway hauled ore from a mine in Mexico six miles into Ernst Canyon.


90 buckets, 7 tons per hour.


After the tram ride, the ore was hauled by wagon about 85 miles to the railroad on the ore road.


You can hike a trail to where this tram house once was.


The same day Glenn Spring got hit by bandits, Boquillas got hit as well. The bandits took their time stealing stuff from the mines and stores on both sides of the river. They took so much stuff that they had to steal a truck from the mine to haul it in.
The bandits took a couple of hostages along to drive the truck as well. The hostages were clever and dogged behind the bandit horse column until they claimed to overheat the truck and then pretended to get it stuck. Convincing the bandit guards (included a Mexican Lieutenant Colonel) that they needed to push, the hostages surprised the bandits by backing over them and taking their weapons. They delivered the bandits that had previously held them to the Sheriff on the US side.

In the mean time, the US Army was called to chase the bandits down in Mexico. They showed up with horses and cars. To make a long story short, they chased around in Mexico, with a film crew in tow, and ended up getting back much of the loot.

Part of the tram route.


If you hike into the canyon you will see some of these ancient grinding holes where grain was ground over hundreds of years.




Boquillas is across the river. It suffered quite heavily once the border crossing was closed in 2002.


The good news is that we will open an unmanned border crossing next month that will allow about 15-20K visitors to go to Boquillas MX each year to buy tacos and trinkets. Huge economic boon to the town. It will also allow some Mexicans to come to the store at Boquillas instead of taking a 240 mile alternate route through Ojinaga. This will cost the US government about $220K per year to maintain this crossing - about $15 per crossing.


This store used to be on the US side years ago. If a rancher needed Mexican laborers (illegal) he could go to the store and leave word. The store owner was said to have acted as an agent to get work for people. By the time you left the store, there would be the manpower you needed in the back of your truck.


Texas Rangers at Boquillas (US).


This is the approximately $3.5 M border station under construction. It will bring about 8 additional border patrol agents to live in the park. Some people worry about smuggling because the station is unmanned (cameras and scanners).

Groundbreaking.


Boquillas MX to the left, river in the middle, border station to the right.




Entrance to the border station.
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