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Old 04-16-2012, 06:06 PM   #91
triplenickel
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It's funner.
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Old 04-16-2012, 06:59 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by bobnoxious67 View Post
Nice ride, and nice bike.

But did you really need a twin to do that? I would have been unable to do that on my 610? Or unhappy?
Sure, but the 95 miles of twisty pavement out and the 110 miles of twisties back at 8000ft would not have been as much fun.

I only posted pics of the cool dirt sections, but there was a fair amount of tarmac.

Heck you could probably do it on a Honda Ruckus 50cc scooter if you wanted to.

It's not really about being able to do it, it's about how much fun you have doing it.
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:00 PM   #93
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Plus your 650cc feels like a 250cc at 9000ft.
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:10 PM   #94
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
So, have we all concluded that there is NO advantage of large displacement bikes in the dirt?

By the way. If anyone wants an extra 20 rear wheel horsepower out of their Tiger 800's let me know.
There is one. Steep hills, not 'insane' just steep. With the pig I can just pick a line and go, with the smaller dirt bikes I used to have to have a run up - and of course if something went wrong half-way up the only option was turn around and try again.

Mind you, more than made up for by how f'ing terrifying they are going back down - but it is one advantage.

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Old 04-16-2012, 07:23 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julesmt View Post
There`s no advantage in dirt riding a big displacement bike. A smaller / lighter bike will always be easier to ride / faster / more fun in the dirt. The only advantage of the big bikes is that you can travel a lot of distance fast.

Of all the big adventure bikes the only one that can be ridden aggressive is the big KTM, but only with a very good rider on top of it.
Hmm. I believe it was Daniel Patrick Moynihan who said "everyone is entitled to their own opinion but not their own facts..."

What does one consider "big adventure bike?" On the more technical places where I ride locally the DR650 is as big a bike as I would want to manage. That said, one of our local riding buds is a German fellow who has ridden Africa, and all over Europe, and the CDT in the US on an R1200GS. He's owned several R12's and KTM's and swears if he goes back to a beast it will be another beemer.

Bottom line - what can be ridden fast on dirt depends entirely on the rider.
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Old 04-16-2012, 11:31 PM   #96
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Reality Check

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Originally Posted by basketcase View Post




Hmm. I believe it was Daniel Patrick Moynihan who said "everyone is entitled to their own opinion but not their own facts..."

What does one consider "big adventure bike?" On the more technical places where I ride locally the DR650 is as big a bike as I would want to manage. That said, one of our local riding buds is a German fellow who has ridden Africa, and all over Europe, and the CDT in the US on an R1200GS. He's owned several R12's and KTM's and swears if he goes back to a beast it will be another beemer.

Bottom line - what can be ridden fast on dirt depends entirely on the rider.
I think 'big' means more horsepower not just more mass though the two often go together.
With a DR650 putting out less HP than some 450 enduros I don't think you can call it big just heavy.
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:56 AM   #97
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I'm guessing you've neither ridden the 950SE nor done that or a similar ride.
You're missing the point.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:27 AM   #98
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You're missing the point.
And you're missing a lot of fun... and a cylinder.
BTW what was the point?
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:31 AM   #99
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I never bought my GSA wanting to ride every sandpit I could find. Since buying it over a year ago, I've also happened to prove I hate soft sand in the interim, mainly by dropping it every time I hit a patch of soft sand. I've decided I definitely don't like soft sand, and there are plenty of other roads/tracks to go and enjoy.

No, I don't think the big bikes have any advantage whatsoever, large capacity brings more weight, usually more bulk, more torque, more power, all usually making matters worse when your stubborn head has thought the track was a brilliant idea. That said, it's also very satisfying doing tracks that others are doing on smaller bikes, and they're looking back at you, amazed that they were struggling on a smaller bike, but here you are punting something twice the size over the same terrain.

I only have one bike, and use it for 1000km days, as well as exploring forests and gravel roads. To me, there's only one bike that has such do-all ability.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:32 AM   #100
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I think 'big' means more horsepower not just more mass though the two often go together.
With a DR650 putting out less HP than some 450 enduros I don't think you can call it big just heavy.
Say what?

If the conversation includes the liberty to redefine the common use and meaning of words then someone is grasping for leverage for their argument.

In common English usage "big" = more mass ... i.e., weight and size (inc. width, wheelbase, etc.).

"Small" on the other hand equals just the opposite. Small is less mass ... bulk, weight, length, width -- however one wants to split it out. Thus a 450 Ehduro may have more horsepower, but the smaller overall dimensions simply provide a power to weight ratio that results in peppier performance. That is not the same thing as "big."

By your definition if someone mounted a rocket engine on a 450 it becomes a bigger bike. I'm not buying into that.

Bike size is certainly a factor in what size of bike can be ridden where. I don't take my Gold Wing on any kind of wet dirt, and I will rarely take it on an improved, hard packed, gravel driveway. Anything beyond that is pushing the edge of my abilities. (And my highly skilled, accomplished German riding buddy wouldn't take it on single track...)

On the opposite end of that is the 200 + lb W-O-M-A-N I saw on a 50 to 70 cc displacement enduro bike being taught to ride last week at a local dealership. She had come in and bought herself a crotch rocket and about the time they handed her the keys she said, "I's never been on one of deese before -- how does you'se turn it on?" When I happened through to buy a part she had been out on the vacant lot practicing for nearly an hour.

My point? Again, there is more to it than bike size, and most of the "more to it" comes down to the rider.

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Old 04-17-2012, 05:52 AM   #101
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It's funner.
With this reply, I would say my original question was answered.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:14 AM   #102
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And you're missing a lot of fun... and a cylinder.
BTW what was the point?
So...you're telling me the only way I can have fun and enjoy my ride is to have 2 cylinders?

Funny, but every time I go on a big bike ride with my 610, the multi cylinder guys aren't waiting for me after the pavement (maybe 50 hp/300 lbs is more fun than you think)...but I'm always waiting for them at every intersection in the dirt.

Enjoy what you ride...don't try to convince me I need multi cylinders to enjoy the dirt
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bobnoxious67 screwed with this post 04-17-2012 at 06:20 AM
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:19 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by bobnoxious67 View Post
So...you're telling me the only way I can have fun and enjoy my ride is to have 2 cylinders?
Four cylinders can be fun too but whatever floats your boat is fun.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:36 AM   #104
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Say what?

If the conversation includes the liberty to redefine the common use and meaning of words then someone is grasping for leverage for their argument.

In common English usage "big" = more mass ... i.e., weight and size (inc. width, wheelbase, etc.).

That was big of you to point that out.

Actually the original term was "large displacement" and I'm sure it didn't refer to the volume of water moved aside when the vehicle was imersed in a body of water.

BTW Webster lists 17 definitions and Oxford 3. Genericly big is something larger than others of the same type. Mass is included but not to the exclusion of other parameters.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:33 AM   #105
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"What is the advantage of LARGE DISPLACEMENT in the DIRT?"

Focus people...
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